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View Full Version : [SOLVED] How do you install a tar.gz file?



TAspr
February 28th, 2011, 10:38 PM
Hello, I was wondering how you open a .tar.gz file? I downloaded it, but do knot know wether or not to extract it, open, or what. Even after I do that it does not do anything. Please Help.

cotcot
February 28th, 2011, 10:44 PM
Right click on the file. Select "extract here" in the drop down menu. Go to the extracted directory. Find a README file or INSTALL file. These files explains how to install (compile) the application.
You will have to compile the program. Sure you want to do that ? Is installing of precompiled packages through synaptic not an option ?

TechWiz2100
February 28th, 2011, 10:50 PM
Sure you want to do that ? Is installing of precompiled packages through synaptic not an option ?

Off topic:
Just curious... why is everyone here so against compiling source? Back when I was on various other forums compiling was the way to go and now its Synaptic or no go. Weird.

coffeecat
February 28th, 2011, 11:42 PM
Off topic:
Just curious... why is everyone here so against compiling source?

People are not necessarily against compiling from source, but this is the beginners' section. A lot of beginners do not know about Linux package managers and make the mistake of hunting for software on the internet, and finding tar.gz files without knowing that these (probably) contain source code and need compiling.

It is a kindness to newcomers to point them to the Ubuntu Software Centre or Synaptic. Believe me, I have seen many threads where the OP is amazed when they finally discover just how easy it is to install applications in Ubuntu using the package managers.

TechWiz2100
February 28th, 2011, 11:45 PM
People are not necessarily against compiling from source, but this is the beginners' section. A lot of beginners do not know about Linux package managers and make the mistake of hunting for software on the internet, and finding tar.gz files without knowing that these (probably) contain source code and need compiling.

It is a kindness to newcomers to point them to the Ubuntu Software Centre or Synaptic. Believe me, I have seen many threads where the OP is amazed when they finally discover just how easy it is to install applications in Ubuntu using the package managers.

Ah yes that would make a lot of sense. I personally prefer compiling source and leave Synaptic to packages that update often, because I've been doing it that way since I started using Linux a few years back -shrugs-

alegomaster
March 1st, 2011, 12:20 AM
I say that compiling from source is usually better, because it gives a better learning experience then with other methods.

TechWiz2100
March 1st, 2011, 12:25 AM
I say that compiling from source is usually better, because it gives a better learning experience then with other methods.

With learning comes work and occasional frustration. Nothing major for those using linux as a hobby or for educational purposes but no good for those who are short on time :P

alegomaster
March 1st, 2011, 12:43 AM
With learning comes work and occasional frustration. Nothing major for those using linux as a hobby or for educational purposes but no good for those who are short on time :P

Lol I am actually running out of time to fix a program that involves serial communication. No time to learn a new way.

TAspr
March 1st, 2011, 12:49 AM
Well, it was for the full version of Open Office that lets you import documents into pdf files. I have been trying to get this done all day.

TAspr
March 1st, 2011, 12:51 AM
Right click on the file. Select "extract here" in the drop down menu. Go to the extracted directory. Find a README file or INSTALL file. These files explains how to install (compile) the application.
You will have to compile the program. Sure you want to do that ? Is installing of precompiled packages through synaptic not an option ?

No, it was for the .tar.gz for the program.

TechWiz2100
March 1st, 2011, 12:54 AM
Well, it was for the full version of Open Office that lets you import documents into pdf files. I have been trying to get this done all day.

I'm pretty sure the full OpenOffice suite is on Ubuntu Software Center. Search "open office" it will be the 2nd result
"OpenOffice.org Office Suite" and it also includes a nice long list of plugins to extend the usefulness of OOo