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XMasterrrr
February 9th, 2011, 05:39 AM
hello guys, so i already fully moved to linux programming and deleted windows i think it's suck lol!.

now i see that's a lot of programmers using mac and vice versa on ubuntu

so what's better to use mac or linux ?

NightwishFan
February 9th, 2011, 05:46 AM
I have never used Macs so I can not speak for them. I do know that Linux systems and Debian/Ubuntu in particular are great for development. You have many different programming tools, languages, and development packages right in a secure repository. As for what languages to use, check out Python. It is very easy to make a useful GUI application in under 50 lines of code. :)

GregBrannon
February 9th, 2011, 07:04 AM
In what language are you planning to program and for which platforms? If you see many programming on Macs in an area that interests you, it may be because Macs have to be used to do that kind of programming.

XMasterrrr
February 9th, 2011, 07:27 AM
iam C and C++ programmer and iam just 15 years old and aiming to be system programming

so i don't know linux or mac to start with :s

already using ubuntu for 4 months with fully transfered to ubuntu

V for Vincent
February 9th, 2011, 08:09 AM
If you're learning, I don't think it matters. All you need at the moment is a basic text editor with some syntax highlighting and a compiler.

schauerlich
February 9th, 2011, 09:08 AM
OS X is Unix-y, so most of the command line stuff that works on linux works on OS X. That is, emacs, vim, gcc, diff, git, svn, etc, all work on OS X, as well as compilers/interpreters for just about any semi-popular language. There's also a bunch of other stuff you can get via MacPorts, but that can be a hassle to set up sometimes. Make sure you install XCode in order to get GCC and clang if you don't want to deal with MacPorts. It's on your OS X install CD, or available from Apple's site if you sign up (for free) for their developer program. Both platforms have the basics, though, so it's really up to personal preference. If you're doing C/C++/ObjC, XCode is a decent enough IDE from what I can tell (I haven't used it much). Other popular IDEs like Eclipse and Code::Blocks are also available on OS X, and I presume many more can run under X11 (also on the install CD). Obviously if you want to make anything for the App Store, you've got to use a Mac. Other than that they're fairly equal.

XMasterrrr
February 9th, 2011, 03:23 PM
OS X is Unix-y, so most of the command line stuff that works on linux works on OS X. That is, emacs, vim, gcc, diff, git, svn, etc, all work on OS X, as well as compilers/interpreters for just about any semi-popular language. There's also a bunch of other stuff you can get via MacPorts, but that can be a hassle to set up sometimes. Make sure you install XCode in order to get GCC and clang if you don't want to deal with MacPorts. It's on your OS X install CD, or available from Apple's site if you sign up (for free) for their developer program. Both platforms have the basics, though, so it's really up to personal preference. If you're doing C/C++/ObjC, XCode is a decent enough IDE from what I can tell (I haven't used it much). Other popular IDEs like Eclipse and Code::Blocks are also available on OS X, and I presume many more can run under X11 (also on the install CD). Obviously if you want to make anything for the App Store, you've got to use a Mac. Other than that they're fairly equal.

already using VIM, i don't know way to go

but i know that's i'll be using cracked programs on mac as i think....

in your self what you think about it mac or linux better ? for programming

or if i got enough on linux just keep on?

Simian Man
February 9th, 2011, 03:31 PM
It's like asking "What's the best for writing a book, a pencil or a pen?". You can use each just as well, it's just a matter of personal preference and what you are more comfortable with. But it really makes no difference.

V for Vincent
February 9th, 2011, 03:57 PM
but i know that's i'll be using cracked programs on mac as i think....
?

I'm not going to go into the subject of piracy here. In the end, that's up to you. But you don't need any special programs. Simple is better at first. If you need to be highly productive, then you use an advanced IDE (which are also freely available). If you need to learn, then you use a basic tool.

cprofitt
February 9th, 2011, 06:00 PM
I think Windows, OS X, and Linux are all decent platforms for programming.

If you want to write .Net apps and that are Windows only; Windows is the platform of choice.

If you want to write ObjectiveC - Cocoa apps only; OS S is the platform of choice.

If you are just learning and want to be able to write cross platform; Linux would be my platform of choice.

For cost - to you - I would rank it Linux (lease expensive), Windows (medium expense), OS X (expensive).

In order to match the specs of the last laptop I purchased I would have needed to pay double the amount to get a Mac Book Pro. (I paid $1300 for the Lenovo T-Series, the closest matching Mac Book was $2600)

trent.josephsen
February 9th, 2011, 09:26 PM
Based on my admittedly flimsy experience with Macs, the only thing that sticks out in my memory is how old the software was. I recall being frustrated by an extremely outdated version of Python and a somehow crippled shell (I don't remember how, but it antagonized me for hours).

I hear some not-so-great things about the convenience of updating core tools like Python and Perl -- presumably OS X doesn't play nicely with new versions, so I think you sometimes have to install new versions alongside the old ones... not being a Mac user myself, I can't personally testify to that; I'm just repeating what I remember hearing.

idi0tf0wl
February 9th, 2011, 09:36 PM
Macs are damned fantastic, that's for sure. Ain't a single thing to worry about when you use them. They really do work.

That being said, the only reason I keep a harddrive around with OS X on it anymore is because it's necessary for certain things I do. When I get the choice otherwise, I work on Ubuntu. Ubuntu is damnedFantastic*1000. Nothing beats the level of productivity you can achieve when your machine does what you tell it to. In the context of programming (or graphic work, to be honest), I find Ubuntu to be an extremely (the most, daresay I) capable and solid OS.

schauerlich
February 9th, 2011, 10:55 PM
Based on my admittedly flimsy experience with Macs, the only thing that sticks out in my memory is how old the software was. I recall being frustrated by an extremely outdated version of Python and a somehow crippled shell (I don't remember how, but it antagonized me for hours).


schauerlich@inara:~$ python --version
2.6.1

On 10.6. 2.6 isn't that old. A lot of new stuff is still being written to be compatible with 2.5. And as far as the shell, I'm not sure what you mean. It comes with GNU bash, tcsh and ksh. Perhaps you mean Terminal.app? There are other terminal emulators available, although I've always found Terminal.app sufficient. The one thing that annoys me about it is that sometimes CMD and ALT act funny because it's being captured by the app and not the terminal itself.

trent.josephsen
February 10th, 2011, 12:54 AM
At the time, I think 2.5 was out and the machine I was on was still on 2.2 (going from memory here).

I don't remember the specific issue(s) I had with the shell. I do remember fighting with a terminal over control characters. I also remember that some of the commands I expected to find weren't in my $PATH, which was a minor annoyance but not a real problem.

As you can probably tell from the vagueness of my answers, it was a while ago and I'm already out of my depth Mac-wise. The last Apple product I can claim to have owned was an Apple IIc.