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c00lwaterz
November 13th, 2010, 04:01 PM
can anyone list down some pointers for laptop here, so when we check or buy laptop it is more easy to decide.

lets start this ascending. the first will be the most suitable for linux.

example is:

asus
lenovo
dell
etc.

it will help newbie, future users and some people who switch from other distro or OS platform
also some notes is highly appreciated.

Thanks

Red_Steve
November 13th, 2010, 04:08 PM
I can't speak for the production in general but my

clevo m860tu works flawless with ubuntu 10.10 out of the box.

c00lwaterz
November 13th, 2010, 04:11 PM
I can't speak for the production in general but my

clevo m860tu works flawless with ubuntu 10.10 out of the box.

wow thanks for the early response.

maybe developers can help us but I will just put it here so people can see their experience using linux and the brands

matt_symes
November 13th, 2010, 04:12 PM
Hi

My newest laptop Acer Aspire 7540 has run 9.04, 10.04, 10.10 and natty with no problems. Things just work.

Kind regards

sanderd17
November 13th, 2010, 04:40 PM
I've had really big problems with my toshiba sattelite P200. But with Ubuntu 10.04 and 10.10, it works o.o.t.b.

I hope it will stay so but I would'n put my conmputer on top due to previous problems. And I hear newer versions of my computer also have problems with newer ubuntus.

I believe system 76 should be on top of the list.

c00lwaterz
November 13th, 2010, 04:43 PM
I've had really big problems with my toshiba sattelite P200. But with Ubuntu 10.04 and 10.10, it works o.o.t.b.

I hope it will stay so but I would'n put my conmputer on top due to previous problems. And I hear newer versions of my computer also have problems with newer ubuntus.

I believe system 76 should be on top of the list.

i have problem also but on fan and touchpad. im using toshiba.
i guess toshiba has many issues with linux. i don't know but it is only my opinion.

Lucradia
November 13th, 2010, 05:00 PM
All laptops branded with IBM will work extremely well with linux (IE: IBM T41) but I'm unsure as to lenovo. You should be looking at individual parts by googling them:

ATI 5750 linux

Like so.


I believe system 76 should be on top of the list.

Some preload vendors use software "hacks" to make it look like your ubuntu works if you order said system preloaded with linux (or, a big flag, is when they disallow you to choose a system without linux.) Dell would be such a vendor.

NightwishFan
November 13th, 2010, 07:19 PM
Some preload vendors use software "hacks" to make it look like your ubuntu works if you order said system preloaded with linux (or, a big flag, is when they disallow you to choose a system without linux.) Dell would be such a vendor.

I am not sure I understand this.

dFlyer
November 13th, 2010, 07:25 PM
Dell Studio 1735, has worked out of the box with 9.04, 9.10, 10.04 and now 10.10. If you do use a dell I recommend you use the dell recovery media tool to roll an ubuntu/dell install disc. It will add the dell drivers needed, with out the need to install them after the install.

Lucradia
November 13th, 2010, 07:28 PM
I am not sure I understand this.


If you do use a dell I recommend you use the dell recovery media tool to roll an ubuntu/dell install disc. It will add the dell drivers needed, with out the need to install them after the install.

*shrug*

jaezcurra
November 13th, 2010, 07:36 PM
Try ZaReason: http://zareason.com/shop/home.php.

They only build Linux (Ubuntu) computers and they even ship out of USA.

stmiller
November 13th, 2010, 07:41 PM
Anything intel based.

themarker0
November 13th, 2010, 08:06 PM
I've foudn most Acers to work work fairly well.
Dells do work well, but i wouldn't touch them with a 100 ft pole.
Asus if you want to pay a little more, do some research and grab them. If they work they are easily the best.

Old_Grey_Wolf
November 13th, 2010, 08:40 PM
I have Dell, Toshiba, Lenovo, HP/Compaq, and ASUS. They are all compatible if you check the network adapter and video card/chips before buying them. I avoid ATI graphics and Broadcom network adapters. Most of the manufacturers let you customize the computer. When I bought the Dell, I chose the Intel network adapter rather than the default Broadcom.

Likewise, I have not found a brand where all models work out-of-the-box with Linux. Even the ones that come with Linux pre-installed may have special drivers on them.

alexan
November 13th, 2010, 09:19 PM
IBM Thinkpads

SeijiSensei
November 13th, 2010, 09:30 PM
I've had success with a Dell Inspiron 640m and an ASUS 1201N netbook. If you have any control over the hardware, add an Intel wireless card as I did with my Dell. I generally avoid anything with ATI graphics; the ASUS has a pretty good Nvidia card that supports VDPAU video decoding with software like mplayer. Most vanilla machines have Intel video which was generally underpowered for today's more-demanding graphics tasks. I hear that the current generation of Intel video adapters are better, though. The upside of Intel graphics is that the drivers are open-source and generally work without futzing.

I'd avoid the more proprietary machines, particularly Sony Vaios and perhaps Toshibas as well. Basically the more vanilla the better.

c00lwaterz
November 13th, 2010, 10:56 PM
so the toshiba has most issues when it comes to linux as i can see through the forums and googling.

if not all models of a brand will work to be on top, can we just rate the most number of models with no issue with linux (like i said in the first post)?

example only.

asus = 90% of models work with linux
dell = 60% of models work with linux.
acer = 40$..
so and so-fort...

this is only example.

i post this thread so it's easy to see which brand is more effective with linux.

Thanks :P

c00lwaterz
November 13th, 2010, 10:59 PM
All laptops branded with IBM will work extremely well with linux (IE: IBM T41) but I'm unsure as to lenovo. You should be looking at individual parts by googling them:

ATI 5750 linux

Like so.



Some preload vendors use software "hacks" to make it look like your ubuntu works if you order said system preloaded with linux (or, a big flag, is when they disallow you to choose a system without linux.) Dell would be such a vendor.

as far as i know, ibm is now lenovo. im not sure but i think it is beacause lenovo has thinkpad and i heard IBm become lenovo.

Little Bones
November 14th, 2010, 04:13 AM
Having a few issues with my new Acer 5745, but a BIOS update should fix 'em. The only real problem is it not picking up the battery.

I used to have a Toshiba, and on 2 of my friend's Toshiba's it ran without any extra effort.

cptrohn
November 14th, 2010, 04:58 AM
Surprised nobody mentioned system76? They build laptops for Ubuntu as well.

Guitar John
November 14th, 2010, 05:36 AM
Current Dell 1525 and previous Dell 610 run 10.04 LTS. Everything works as it should. Only had to install Broadcomm B43 Wireless Driver.

Segofam
November 14th, 2010, 05:49 AM
My MSI VR60i has worked really well with Ubuntu

...except for the Suspend and Hibernate preference, they don't seem to work.

simpleblue
November 14th, 2010, 06:34 AM
I have an HP Pavillon. Please do not get this name:

Myself and many others included:

- wifi driver issues (pclinuxos)
- video driver issues
- sound issues around 9.04 (finally fixed, but cannot regress to earlier versions of many distros)

Not to mention that I've had issues with almost every install of every distro I've used, and that's been around 30+ distros. Finally things are getting better and most stuff in 'Ubuntu' works out of the box.

and currently has an issue were if you press the keypad/mousepad lock button the mouse freezes. I have read everywhere and cannot find a solution. It stays this way until reinstall. Many MANY people have reported this as a bug. There are at least 4 bug reports on it and hundreds of comments.

Imagine the frustration of having someone press the button by accident. And imagine how silly it is to tell a person, "Please don't press this button or I'll have to reinstall..." Everytime I let someone use my computer I have to pray they don't press that damn button. :(

Sorry to vent, but I feel it is my duty to warn you lest you see a beautiful shiny HP in the store and decide to buy it.

Sean Moran
November 14th, 2010, 08:42 AM
Compaq CQ60 was up and running Karmic within an hour of unwrapping her carefully out of the cardboard box and folding all the bubblewrap into nice rectangles. It's getting close to a year now, since that day, and everything Ubuntu Karmic has worked perfectly, although I've had a few USB peripheral dilemmas of my own ignorant making - found all the answers here after looking around a little bit.

One small quirk that still eludes me relates to booting on the three separate USB flash sticks I work with, but it maybe something in my configuration:

When I boot, and press F9 for the Multi-boot Menu, (with a Flash stick inserted), it usually doesn't show on the menu, so I go into Setup and get to Boot Order, and then F5, F6 to move the USB HDD Drive up and down a bit, and then F10 to save config, and reboot. That works, and the USB drive is added to the Multi-boot Menu, but then the next time I stick a stick in thed USB port, it's gone again, so I have to go through the same Setup rigmarole once more.

That's the only little thing I find slightly annoying about this Compaq, AMD Atheron chip if I remember. Other than that one thing, she runs Ubuntu like a dream, albeit a little low-res with the NVidia 185 drivers: 1366x768. Can't have everything. Can't complain.

alababi
November 14th, 2010, 08:53 AM
Mine is a Vaio E, it got a sound problem on 10.4 because of the old version of alsa. After switching to 10.10 with the new alsa, it works just well.

However, the vaio and web buttons dont work on Ubuntu. On windows, I use the web button to open firefox and the vaio one to control sound volume. Another thing that I notice that the temperature is hotter than that on windows, about 4-5C.

Sam Fallow
November 14th, 2010, 09:08 AM
I can't speak for the production in general but my

clevo m860tu works flawless with ubuntu 10.10 out of the box.

Another vote for Clevo. I have the M760T that was supplied without an operating system and everything works with Ubuntu (10.04).

I have been surprised at the quality of the laptop considering the low price I paid. I would definitely buy another.

c00lwaterz
November 14th, 2010, 11:16 AM
Having a few issues with my new Acer 5745, but a BIOS update should fix 'em. The only real problem is it not picking up the battery.

I used to have a Toshiba, and on 2 of my friend's Toshiba's it ran without any extra effort.

that is lucky for your toshiba. have you found any remedies for your acer?

c00lwaterz
November 14th, 2010, 11:17 AM
Surprised nobody mentioned system76? They build laptops for Ubuntu as well.

i saw system76 on some thread but really few to choose from.

c00lwaterz
November 14th, 2010, 11:20 AM
Current Dell 1525 and previous Dell 610 run 10.04 LTS. Everything works as it should. Only had to install Broadcomm B43 Wireless Driver.

hmmm broadcomm again., manufacturers should provide some support for linux. I mean not only dell but all laptop,desktop, netbook should provide driver support for linux. even MS got the biggest market share, they should provided also for apple and linux because apple and linux is also competing OS in the market.

c00lwaterz
November 14th, 2010, 11:21 AM
My MSI VR60i has worked really well with Ubuntu

...except for the Suspend and Hibernate preference, they don't seem to work.

wow that's is lucky!. do "most" msi work well with linux? i know msi has some good specs also

c00lwaterz
November 14th, 2010, 11:24 AM
I have an HP Pavillon. Please do not get this name:

Myself and many others included:

- wifi driver issues (pclinuxos)
- video driver issues
- sound issues around 9.04 (finally fixed, but cannot regress to earlier versions of many distros)

Not to mention that I've had issues with almost every install of every distro I've used, and that's been around 30+ distros. Finally things are getting better and most stuff in 'Ubuntu' works out of the box.

and currently has an issue were if you press the keypad/mousepad lock button the mouse freezes. I have read everywhere and cannot find a solution. It stays this way until reinstall. Many MANY people have reported this as a bug. There are at least 4 bug reports on it and hundreds of comments.

Imagine the frustration of having someone press the button by accident. And imagine how silly it is to tell a person, "Please don't press this button or I'll have to reinstall..." Everytime I let someone use my computer I have to pray they don't press that damn button. :(

Sorry to vent, but I feel it is my duty to warn you lest you see a beautiful shiny HP in the store and decide to buy it.

:( did you try to search to fix this? in my fan problem still got no solution.

linuxforartists
November 23rd, 2010, 07:45 AM
Here's an official website for checking hardware compatibility:

Ubuntu-certified Hardware (http://webapps.ubuntu.com/certification/)

You can look up computers by brand, or by which release of Ubuntu. There's also a key difference. "Ubuntu certified" means the computer was inspected by Canonical. "Ubuntu ready" means the manufacturer inspected the computer using Canonical's certification test suite and submitted the results.

From what I've read in the forums here and elsewhere, these brands seem to be the most compatible:

BEST: Lenovo/IBM, HP, and Dell. IBM and HP have long collaborated with Linux, albeit at the enterprise level not retail level. Dell is the only major manufacturer to sell computers pre-loaded with Ubuntu. Their Ubuntu machines have an outdated version though, so it'd be better to get a regular Dell and install it yourself.

GOOD: Asus and Acer.

BAD: Toshiba. I've seen countless discussion threads on problems with Toshiba. I'd be curious to know what people think of Sony and Samsung. I haven't heard too much for or against them.


I have Dell, Toshiba, Lenovo, HP/Compaq, and ASUS. They are all compatible if you check the network adapter and video card/chips before buying them. I avoid ATI graphics and Broadcom network adapters. Most of the manufacturers let you customize the computer. When I bought the Dell, I chose the Intel network adapter rather than the default Broadcom.

Definitely check out the parts, that's even more important than the brand. Linux forced me to be a more informed computer buyer. Like Old_Gray_Wolf said, Broadcom has had a bad track record. Although I heard a lot of those problems were solved with Maverick Meerkat. Atheros network cards are supposed to be good.

For graphics cards, Intel is the most compatible. The sad part is that they seem to be the lowest quality, compared to Nvidia or ATI.

I also don't think Linux can handle the newest graphics cards. I had to pass up on a sweet Asus laptop because I heard Linux had problems with handling "switchable graphics." That's a new kind of card that uses a low-end graphics card for basic tasks (like word processing), then switches to a high-end card when you launch a resource-hungry computer game. Last I checked, they didn't work with Linux.

Age is a big factor too. Ubuntu runs better on old machines, probably because manufacturers are slow to release Linux drivers. If you buy last year's hot machine it will probably work better than the latest and greatest computer.

So I guess your best bet is to buy a Lenovo, HP, or Dell computer with all-Intel parts that came out last year. :-k

Others have already mentioned System76 and ZaReason. But my impression is that the OP is looking for the most compatible brand and install Linux himself (herself?).

c00lwaterz
November 24th, 2010, 02:11 AM
Here's an official website for checking hardware compatibility:

Ubuntu-certified Hardware (http://webapps.ubuntu.com/certification/)

You can look up computers by brand, or by which release of Ubuntu. There's also a key difference. "Ubuntu certified" means the computer was inspected by Canonical. "Ubuntu ready" means the manufacturer inspected the computer using Canonical's certification test suite and submitted the results.

From what I've read in the forums here and elsewhere, these brands seem to be the most compatible:

BEST: Lenovo/IBM, HP, and Dell. IBM and HP have long collaborated with Linux, albeit at the enterprise level not retail level. Dell is the only major manufacturer to sell computers pre-loaded with Ubuntu. Their Ubuntu machines have an outdated version though, so it'd be better to get a regular Dell and install it yourself.

GOOD: Asus and Acer.

BAD: Toshiba. I've seen countless discussion threads on problems with Toshiba. I'd be curious to know what people think of Sony and Samsung. I haven't heard too much for or against them.



Definitely check out the parts, that's even more important than the brand. Linux forced me to be a more informed computer buyer. Like Old_Gray_Wolf said, Broadcom has had a bad track record. Although I heard a lot of those problems were solved with Maverick Meerkat. Atheros network cards are supposed to be good.

For graphics cards, Intel is the most compatible. The sad part is that they seem to be the lowest quality, compared to Nvidia or ATI.

I also don't think Linux can handle the newest graphics cards. I had to pass up on a sweet Asus laptop because I heard Linux had problems with handling "switchable graphics." That's a new kind of card that uses a low-end graphics card for basic tasks (like word processing), then switches to a high-end card when you launch a resource-hungry computer game. Last I checked, they didn't work with Linux.

Age is a big factor too. Ubuntu runs better on old machines, probably because manufacturers are slow to release Linux drivers. If you buy last year's hot machine it will probably work better than the latest and greatest computer.

So I guess your best bet is to buy a Lenovo, HP, or Dell computer with all-Intel parts that came out last year. :-k

Others have already mentioned System76 and ZaReason. But my impression is that the OP is looking for the most compatible brand and install Linux himself (herself?).

WOW! I bow to you sir, your reply is really informative and it can help us decide also which brand and what model we choose. it will minimize the confusion of choosing which is better or what. I also appreciate the website you post and it is really helpful. I really like your reply. big big thanks :p

JustinR
November 24th, 2010, 02:18 AM
I prefer Dells, all computers I've used dell on (such as my Inspiron 1720, 1545 and E1705) work fine - all hardware works.

Also, Dell's are pretty customizable hardware wise - just in case you want that for the future, and have a neat site for replacement parts (www.parts-people.com).

I've been using my Inspiron 1720 for a few years now, all newer versions of Ubuntu work on it just fine.

linuxforartists
November 26th, 2010, 08:32 AM
WOW! I bow to you sir, your reply is really informative and it can help us decide also which brand and what model we choose. it will minimize the confusion of choosing which is better or what. I also appreciate the website you post and it is really helpful. I really like your reply. big big thanks :p

You're welcome! These forums have been my "technical support" ever since I started using Ubuntu. Feels good to return the favor\\:D/

conradin
November 26th, 2010, 08:46 AM
I've found native support for the thinkpads & other lenovo computers.
Asus also, seems to run just fine and have decent support. Asus has been my favourite for years now. Dell, engh, you get what you pay for. Actually some of Dell's business practices really scare me. But, the hardware seems compatible enough.

Untitled_No4
November 26th, 2010, 01:57 PM
Lenovo are very good for Linux compatibility, before that IBM were even better. I've had a few Thinkpads and they all worked out of the box with whatever distribution I put on them.

While Lenovo are straying a bit further from Linux compatibility, they're still good and they at least provide a list of their products and their Linux compatibility. You can see it here:
http://www-307.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss/document.do?lndocid=MIGR-48NT8D&sitestyle=lenovo
The list shows each model and what distribution it was tested against, but generally speaking if a model is compatible with one distribution it's most likely compatible with most others.

That said, this list is not very accurate and I wouldn't get anything just on the basis of that list. For instance, the Thinkpad Edge is marked as compatible, but I've read that it's not an out-of-the-box experience.

As a rule, all Thinkpads of the R, Z, T and W series _should_ be fully compatible.
There's also Thinkwiki.org which has a wealth of information about Linux on Thinkpads (and I think perhaps other IMB/Lenovo models as well).

Some of Lenovo's netbooks used to come pre-installed with Suse but they don't anymore.

Finally, as far as I know Thinkpads laptops are the ones that most Red Hat engineers/employees work on. If it's good enough for Red Hat, it's good enough for me.

c00lwaterz
November 26th, 2010, 05:07 PM
Lenovo are very good for Linux compatibility, before that IBM were even better. I've had a few Thinkpads and they all worked out of the box with whatever distribution I put on them.

While Lenovo are straying a bit further from Linux compatibility, they're still good and they at least provide a list of their products and their Linux compatibility. You can see it here:
http://www-307.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss/document.do?lndocid=MIGR-48NT8D&sitestyle=lenovo
The list shows each model and what distribution it was tested against, but generally speaking if a model is compatible with one distribution it's most likely compatible with most others.

That said, this list is not very accurate and I wouldn't get anything just on the basis of that list. For instance, the Thinkpad Edge is marked as compatible, but I've read that it's not an out-of-the-box experience.

As a rule, all Thinkpads of the R, Z, T and W series _should_ be fully compatible.
There's also Thinkwiki.org which has a wealth of information about Linux on Thinkpads (and I think perhaps other IMB/Lenovo models as well).

Some of Lenovo's netbooks used to come pre-installed with Suse but they don't anymore.

Finally, as far as I know Thinkpads laptops are the ones that most Red Hat engineers/employees work on. If it's good enough for Red Hat, it's good enough for me.

Thanks, the link is useful and really easy to see what you need for linux :p

c00lwaterz
November 26th, 2010, 05:10 PM
You're welcome! These forums have been my "technical support" ever since I started using Ubuntu. Feels good to return the favor\\:D/

as dell is being dominant or maybe large on linux industry. I have this question in my mind about alienware. alienware is part of dell isn't? is alienware laptops full compatible with linux? because alienware is really nice and cool laptop it is interesting to know if this one is in for the linux system. :p

danbuter
November 26th, 2010, 05:16 PM
I have a Lenove Thinkpad Edge, and it's working great with 10.10. The headphone jack did not work with 10.04 or earlier. Generally, the newer your computer components are, the more likely you will have problems.

jshepherd
November 26th, 2010, 05:16 PM
Worked perfectly with my Dell XPS m1330. That is until the dreaded nvidia graphic problem reared its head (Not Ubuntu's fault).

MasterNetra
November 26th, 2010, 05:45 PM
Have a Dell Latitude D530, works for the most part but theres that dreaded Broadcom thing. Fortunately I have a Encore Wireless-G USB adapter (ENUWI-G2) for those initial wireless connections to nab the STA driver (STA has at least for me worked better then its alternative). Otherwise Ubuntu seems to work fine.

(Note: The USB Adapter is crappy in windows, XP at least, but works perfectly fine in linux.)

Untitled_No4
November 27th, 2010, 08:07 AM
I have a Lenove Thinkpad Edge, and it's working great with 10.10. The headphone jack did not work with 10.04 or earlier. Generally, the newer your computer components are, the more likely you will have problems.

Thanks, it's really good to know. I might still get a Thinkpad Edge one days since I think they are amazing machines.

the.scarecrow
November 27th, 2010, 11:16 PM
I have a Dell Inspiron 1750 that is about one year old and it works perfectly with 10.10, at least I have not found any piece of hardware that is not fully working. I installed the Broadcom driver that was automatically offered I just had to click "enable" and I believe that Broadcom has open-sourced their drivers now so that they can be built into future releases of the Kernel. Prior to the 10.10 release I used 10.04 with just a small problem in that the screen would flash occasionally.

I have had several Dells prior to this laptop and they all worked fine with Ubuntu other than minor issues that were easily solved e.g. ATI graphics support.

c00lwaterz
November 28th, 2010, 12:22 AM
I have a Dell Inspiron 1750 that is about one year old and it works perfectly with 10.10, at least I have not found any piece of hardware that is not fully working. I installed the Broadcom driver that was automatically offered I just had to click "enable" and I believe that Broadcom has open-sourced their drivers now so that they can be built into future releases of the Kernel. Prior to the 10.10 release I used 10.04 with just a small problem in that the screen would flash occasionally.

I have had several Dells prior to this laptop and they all worked fine with Ubuntu other than minor issues that were easily solved e.g. ATI graphics support.

nice to hear that broadcom is now ok with linux and open drivers. wishing all manufacturer will open their drivers to linux as well :p

sandyd
November 28th, 2010, 03:51 AM
Dell Studio 15 XPS. got it last week
Company subsidized.

Specs:
Intel Core i7 (1.73-2.93 GHz x 4 ) (8 threaded)
Geforce GT 435 2GB
Intel Wireless.

Works real well, even the 2MP HD built in webcam & backlit keyboard.

Im using the nvidia drivers (the nouveau drivers don't work.....)
and it seems that I can do maximum level antialiasing and still have no lag on anything.

good for playing COD when its a slow day at work.

TBABill
November 28th, 2010, 04:40 AM
Regardless of issues some have posted with Dell, they do support Ubuntu with more models than any other manufacturer. Check the link in my signature.

linuxforartists
December 11th, 2010, 10:25 PM
Update: Dell has a new laptop that comes with Ubuntu 10.04 pre-installed. Choose the entry-level "Essential" build. Costs US$429.

For details, read this: Dell's new Vostro V130 (http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2010/11/dells-new-vostro-v130-ultra-thin-ubuntu-laptop/)

PC_load_letter
December 12th, 2010, 01:43 AM
IIRC, I never had any problems installing Ubuntu or Mint on any of my laptops:
- Dell Vostro 1400 (w/ Intel wireless & Nvidia gpu).
- Thinkpad 43 (w/ Intel wireless & ATI on board graphics).
- HP tablet tc4200.

No problems suspending when lid closed either, this goes back to Hardy as far as I remember.

I_can_see_the_light
December 13th, 2010, 09:51 PM
The laptop I'm using (the one in my signature) have been working really well ever since I started using Ubuntu in 2008, as of 10.04 Hibernate is working also. Have heard that Fujitsu is a good choice when it comes to using Linux.

My wife is using a Dell Inspiron 1525 and it's working really well also, I have installed Linux Mint with a regular disk, not the one from Dell.

c00lwaterz
December 14th, 2010, 10:40 PM
how about mac? I haven't heard of mac user here. anyone? :D

WinterMadness
December 14th, 2010, 11:19 PM
i find that dells are very compatible

vduke
December 27th, 2010, 07:29 AM
Based on my personal experience and research.

I have been Anti-Winblows (well anti for me anyway some people deserve it) for a little over 2 years now.

I currently run Ubuntu 10.10 on the HP G72 i picked up from walmart about 3 weeks ago. Works beautifully (Had to work out a small kink with the Realtek Wifi).

Also running it on an HP G62 that I setup for my wife.

Ubuntu works great on a mac however I kind of do not see the point of running Ubuntu on a Mac. It is already Unix based with a broader spectrum of available software. Not to mention Macs are solid. (I do not recommend spending the extra buck on a mac if your just going to slap Ubuntu on it, Just my opinion. Maybe if you are going to dual boot, but I dont really see why you would use Ubuntu over Mac or Mac over Ubuntu unless you are part of a Linux based development team where everyones environment must be the same).

Prior to this I have run Ubuntu 10.10 on an old P4 desktop from the early 2k's, AMD based dell, Acer Laptop, and they have all worked beautifully.

I did however run into issues when I ran it on an Asus UX50v Laptop (Ubuntu 10.04) With the graphics chipset. Worked fine with the default drivers, but seemed to crash everytime you enabled the nVidia graphic drivers.

It basically boils down to this.

Your best bet is to take an Ubuntu 10.10 CD to Bestbuy or where ever you are going to be looking at computers to compare, and popping it in the drive and trying the live CD.

Get a feel for the machine check if the sound works, see if it list the available wireless connections, etc..

Price is usually an issue, I purchased this G72 17" laptop intel dualcore with 320gb HD and 4GB ram for about $598. My wife got a 15" for $498 AMD dual core, with ATI graphics 3gb of ram 320gb hd. And they are beautiful machines and work great (especially for LAMP development =D)

However I Digress, Being that Ubuntu is community run, an open platform, it's compatibility will change quite frequently. Additional support will be added, some legacy support will be dropped. But if you are using this platform it would be healthy to learn how to Tweak, and re-compile and learn how to solve the little bugs that will either come your way with a new system, or with a future update.

(Anyway I am done rambling)
CHEERS!

fipem
March 15th, 2011, 06:47 PM
[QUOTE=linuxforartists;10151808]Here's an official website for checking hardware compatibility:

Ubuntu-certified Hardware (http://webapps.ubuntu.com/certification/)

You can look up computers by brand, or by which release of Ubuntu. There's also a key difference. "Ubuntu certified" means the computer was inspected by Canonical. "Ubuntu ready" means the manufacturer inspected the computer using Canonical's certification test suite and submitted the results.

From what I've read in the forums here and elsewhere, these brands seem to be the most compatible:

BEST: Lenovo/IBM, HP, and Dell. IBM and HP have long collaborated with Linux, albeit at the enterprise level not retail level. Dell is the only major manufacturer to sell computers pre-loaded with Ubuntu. Their Ubuntu machines have an outdated version though, so it'd be better to get a regular Dell and install it yourself.

GOOD: Asus and Acer.

BAD: Toshiba. I've seen countless discussion threads on problems with Toshiba. I'd be curious to know what people think of Sony and Samsung. I haven't heard too much for or against them.

I have an HP Pavilion dv3 4120-ss and I wouldn't recommend it al ALL, WIFI buton still doesnt work, tried to install the newest version of ubuntu and an error stop me in the middle, had to isntall an older version, after a kernel update it have issues with the video and a black screen, i can't enable privative video drivers as a black screen appears after it... i have an eSATA port that doesnt work under ubuntu and work with windows also the wifi works with windows...

I will never buy an HP again for Ubuntu... still can enable WIFI...