PDA

View Full Version : Was Xandros Any Good



tekkidd
November 13th, 2010, 06:10 AM
I found out about it right as it was shutting down and was curious to ask from those who used it, was it a good linux distro, compared to others

theraje
November 13th, 2010, 06:20 AM
Xandros used to come stock on Asus Eee 700-series netbooks. It was OK, but it had a fair share of problems. It didn't work well when adding or removing software (adding a new application required a bit of hacking), and was a bit silly with its "normal" mode (which is similar to Ubuntu Netbook Edition's dashboard stuff) and its "advanced" mode (which is more like a standard desktop, but still relatively crippled).

Of course, the Eee 700 series only had 2GB of storage space, and debuted in 2008 (I think, anyway), so I guess they figured there wasn't enough room for more software. :P

Asus has since replaced Xandros with something called "Linux ezOS" and a few other variants, but the vast majority of their netbooks now ship with Windows. And no matter which version of Linux came on a machine, it tended to get replaced with a more fully featured, better-supported Linux OS.

themarker0
November 13th, 2010, 06:25 AM
I've looked all around, and only wikipedia says its closing. :/

chessnerd
November 13th, 2010, 06:58 AM
I've looked all around, and only wikipedia says its closing. :/

The desktop version is dead. Look at it's "What's New?" page on Xandros' website:

http://www.xandros.com/products/desktop/new.html


Firefox Version 2.0

The newest version of Firefox includes improved tabbed browsing and search, spell checking, Web feeds and identity theft protection.

So, their "new" version comes with an unsupported version of Firefox. :P

davidvandoren
November 13th, 2010, 07:08 AM
I had Xandros installed on one of my PCs about 6 years ago.
At that time they specialized in crossover. And it worked pretty well for back then.
But with open office getting better and better and wine as well. I think they lost a lot of that.

cariboo
November 13th, 2010, 08:38 AM
I was one of the beta testers for version 1. Xandros started out as Corel Linux, Corel sold it off when the Dot.com boom went bust in the late 90's. At that time Xandros came up with a proprietary File Manager and Update Client, otherwise it was just another re-branded version of Debian.

I still have the original CD's and user manual, but lost the install key, so I can't install it if I were feeling nostalgic. :)

Spice Weasel
November 13th, 2010, 09:01 AM
It gives you root access if you ask in a stern voice.

I'm not trying to be funny by quoting xkcd, that's seriously how secure it was.

coffeecat
November 13th, 2010, 09:24 AM
Xandros used to come stock on Asus Eee 700-series netbooks.

...

Of course, the Eee 700 series only had 2GB of storage space, and debuted in 2008 (I think, anyway), so I guess they figured there wasn't enough room for more software. :P


I bought my EeePC soon after they first came out in late 2007 and it came with a 4GB SSD. Still not enough. :wink:


It gives you root access if you ask in a stern voice.

You didn't have to use a stern voice. You were root. For that reason and several others, my overall impression of Xandros on the EeePC at least was http://ubuntuforums.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=175488&stc=1&d=1289636511

I soon replaced it with Ubuntu.

theraje
November 13th, 2010, 11:19 AM
I bought my EeePC soon after they first came out in late 2007 and it came with a 4GB SSD. Still not enough. :wink:

Nice, one of the "big" models of the time. The EeePC "Surf" models usually came with only 2GB SSDs, but the fancy-shmancy ones came with a whopping 4GB! :D :P

coffeecat
November 13th, 2010, 11:25 AM
but the fancy-shmancy ones came with a whopping 4GB! :D :P

Well, you see, I though I would indulge myself. :wink: I still had memories of the first PC I owned that came with a hard drive. It ran ms-dos 3, had 1 megabyte of memory (of which the OS could only address 640KB) and had a hard drive of - wait for it - 40 megabytes. I didn't know what to do with all that storage space. :shock:

theraje
November 13th, 2010, 12:07 PM
Well, you see, I though I would indulge myself. :wink: I still had memories of the first PC I owned that came with a hard drive. It ran ms-dos 3, had 1 megabyte of memory (of which the OS could only address 640KB) and had a hard drive of - wait for it - 40 megabytes. I didn't know what to do with all that storage space. :shock:

Wow! I remember when my dad installed a hard drive in our first computer. It was *so* nice. I could play games without having to swap floppy disks! :D

Our first computer was a Tandy-1000. It came with no hard drive, a few KB of RAM, a 5.25" floppy drive (back when the case over a floppy disk was floppy too... so much confusion ensued when the 3.5" floppy "hard" disk debuted! :P). The case was humongous, weighed a ton, and the thing cost a few thousand dollars.

I also remember getting our first modem (for a later computer) - 2800 baud. It took an hour to download one MB from the BBS system across the street!

High times, I tell ya. Now hand me my walker and get off my lawn you whipper-snappers! :D

coffeecat
November 13th, 2010, 12:24 PM
Aha - that ms-dos computer I was referring to was the first I had with a hard drive. :)


Our first computer was a Tandy-1000. It came with no hard drive, a few KB of RAM, a 5.25" floppy drive (back when the case over a floppy disk was floppy too... so much confusion ensued when the 3.5" floppy "hard" disk debuted! :P). The case was humongous, weighed a ton, and the thing cost a few thousand dollars.

I also remember getting our first modem (for a later computer) - 2800 baud. It took an hour to download one MB from the BBS system across the street!

You had a floppy drive with your first computer??!! I would have given my soul for a floppy drive. My first computer was a Sinclair Spectrum (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinclair_Spectrum) :oops: with all of 16K RAM. You hooked up a cassette tape machine to load up programs and data and to save them. Or rather you hooked up a tape machine, started it up and went and had supper while it was loading. And a modem. What's a modem? :confused:


Now hand me my walker and get off my lawn you whipper-snappers! :grin:

Whipper-snapper? I can remember when they brought in those new-fangled horseless carriage things. :-s

:wink:

theraje
November 13th, 2010, 12:33 PM
Hehe :)

Yeah, I think we might have had a Sinclair (my parents said we had a really old computer they bought in the late '70s, but that was just slightly before my time... despite the walker remark :P). Not sure if it was a Sinclair, as no one can remember what it was called!

I also had a good old Commodore 64 with a tape drive. It took FOREVER to load a program that was probably just a few KB. At least half an hour. The floppy disk programs were better - they only took about 15 minutes to load an app from a single-density disk!

The modem came along much later. Probably around 1990. It was still quite a thing - you could actually connect your computer to another computer that wasn't even in your house! *shock*

But yeah, "old" technology is fun. :)

drawkcab
November 14th, 2010, 08:42 PM
The only upside to Xandros was the accelerated boot time. Other than that, it was terrible and a disaster for Asus.

Linux folks dumped Xandros and either went lighter and faster (puppeee) or upgraded their hardware to run full distros. There are a few die-hard Xandros fans in the eeepc community that swear by the distro.

I love Xandros because all the returns were refurbished and some of us were able to get hot deals on eeepcs because it was such a failure. :D

Asus should have called Canonical.

Spice Weasel
November 14th, 2010, 08:45 PM
The only upside to Xandros was the accelerated boot time. Other than that, it was terrible and a disaster for Asus.

Linux folks dumped Xandros and either went lighter and faster (puppeee) or upgraded their hardware to run full distros. There are a few die-hard Xandros fans in the eeepc community that swear by the distro.

I love Xandros because all the returns were refurbished and some of us were able to get hot deals on eeepcs because it was such a failure. :D

Asus should have called Canonical.

There have been worse distros used in netbooks. :P

drawkcab
November 14th, 2010, 08:53 PM
There have been worse distros used in netbooks. :P

No doubt!

Paqman
November 14th, 2010, 09:07 PM
You hooked up a cassette tape machine to load up programs and data and to save them. Or rather you hooked up a tape machine, started it up and went and had supper while it was loading.

And when you came back it invariably said "R tape loading error". Ug.

drawkcab
November 14th, 2010, 09:16 PM
omg the tape machine!

now i'm going to have nightmares

kaldor
November 14th, 2010, 09:20 PM
My honest opinion is that it gave Linux a horrible reputation to those who tried out the eeePC. Every person I spoke to who ever bought an eeePC with Xandros came to the conclusion that Linux is useless.

A friend bought an eeePC when they first came out and showed it to me. His complaints were valid. The UI is horrible, it looks cheap, and it's too limited. He said he never wanted to touch Linux again after using it. He pirated XP and was good to go.

Then the companies say Linux isn't a good seller. Maybe if they chose a good distro it'd be different.

scottuss
November 14th, 2010, 09:24 PM
I had it on my EEE 701 and got rid very quickly. iptables wasn't compiled in which for me was a massive problem. Why would you want a netbook that could be connecting to hundreds of different networks to be without a firewall?

Plus, it didn't feel "full" enough. It's been an Ubuntu runner for years now.

Spice Weasel
November 14th, 2010, 11:28 PM
No doubt!

*coughlinpuscough*. (http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=linpus)

SadisticCheeto
November 15th, 2010, 12:46 AM
I never had any experience with it on a netbook, but I did use it years ago when I was first getting into Linux. It wasn't bad to me at the time. I used it regularly for a while because it worked well with the modem I was using, and it was a pain to get that to work correctly. I do not like how it eventually chose to go with product activation and the like. I think that was the reason that I moved on from it.

Looking back on my time with it, it was a decent Windows replacement (for my father and I both), but we both eventually moved on to better (like Ubuntu).

cariboo
November 15th, 2010, 02:15 AM
All I can say about Xandros is that version 1 was released Dec 2002. I switched to Debian January 2003. :)

drawkcab
November 15th, 2010, 03:08 AM
*coughlinpuscough*. (http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=linpus)

LoL!!! I had Linpus on my Acer Revo. I never booted into it once...just installed Ubuntu.

I guess I tend to buy devices with crappy Linux operating systems preinstalled so that I can avoid the windows tax.

Jechem
November 15th, 2010, 03:42 AM
I bought the EEEPC 4G when it first released here last 2007. It was preinstalled with Xandros which was so neat beacuse of the new netbook interface. Xandros was a good distro for beginners and easy to use. The problem was you can't install new softwares without pulling your hair out on all the manual procedures to do. They had a software center where you can upgrade BIOS and other preinstalled software but after a year it was inactive, no new upgrades and softwares available. From then on I tried XP slimmed down but it couldn't handle skype video even if I had upgraded the RAM to 1Gig and tried other linux distro but Ubuntu was the one that worked OOTB.

mkendall
November 15th, 2010, 08:51 AM
<stuff>

Yeah, had to deal with the tape recorder, but didn't have to deal with punch cards, although the utility bills came on them.

daverich
November 15th, 2010, 10:50 AM
i use an old asus 2g and replaced the os with puppeee linux.

i tried ubuntu on it but that wouldn't even play mp3s cleanly, but i've installed kde on top of puppy and now i can run amarok with crossfading and everything working just fine with 256kbs mp3s (i use the asus for backing tracks and discos - it's a great portable unit)

:)

Kind regards

Dave Rich

ronnielsen1
November 15th, 2010, 11:04 AM
I bought the EEEPC 4G when it first released here last 2007. It was preinstalled with Xandros which was so neat beacuse of the new netbook interface. Xandros was a good distro for beginners and easy to use. The problem was you can't install new softwares without pulling your hair out on all the manual procedures to do. They had a software center where you can upgrade BIOS and other preinstalled software but after a year it was inactive, no new upgrades and softwares available. From then on I tried XP slimmed down but it couldn't handle skype video even if I had upgraded the RAM to 1Gig and tried other linux distro but Ubuntu was the one that worked OOTB.

That was the problem I had with xandros, you couldn't install anything that wasn't in their repo without borking your system

Crafty Kisses
November 15th, 2010, 12:57 PM
Never liked Xandros.

bill blakely
April 27th, 2012, 06:45 AM
Well, I liked it!
After struggling with W98 for several years, and several years of crashes, for no explainable reasons, I bought Corel Linux and Word Perfect Office for Linux in Jan, 01. But it was a bit much for me, and I never got them working. So I suffered with W98 for another year.
I bought Xandros 1 in October, 2002. After a four click install, I thought I was in computer heaven. Everything worked. All the time. It never crashed. Ten years later, I'm still using it. And in that time it crashed maybe a half dozen times. The Xandros File Manager worked great.
But, alas, there has been no upgrade from X4.5 in four years. The company ran dry about two years ago (but negelected to tell its loyal users!) The forums are still active.
I suppose that there is a way to get the latest libs and such, but that's beyond me. Day by day, less stuff on the web works. It appears that Kubuntu is in my future.
So two quickie questions,
>Will the kubuntu installer partition my drive, or should I do that, somehow, before the install?
>Do you get a choice of file systems, ext2, ext3, reiser? Which works best?
BTW, my first computer was a Timex-Sinclair (2kb memory, you could buy 16k more for $75.) I owned an Atari 1200xl, and W3.0, 3.1, and W98. You would think that I would know more than I do.
bill