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abclemons
November 7th, 2010, 05:49 PM
This is my first foray into programming. My university requires we take a C++ class, but I haven't gone through it yet. However, I got into a class, numerical analysis and methods, which requires a basic knowledge of C++. Thus I got the book C++ for Mathematicians by Scheinermann to self-study before next semester. I ask you to please be patient... I'm a noob programmer.

I'm in chapter three, and we're writing a program to calculate the GCD of using two known integers. The author says this route is inefficient but that he will continue to refine it. Now, for the error:

aaron@hpdv9005us:~/Documents/C++ Programs$ g++ gcd.cc gcd-tester.cc -o gcd-tester
gcd-tester.cc: In function ‘int main()’:
gcd-tester.cc:18: error: ‘gcd’ was not declared in this scope


Here's the code for the gcd.h, gcd.cc, and gcd-tester.cc:

gcd.h

#ifndef GCD_H
#define GCD_H

/**
* Calculate the greatest common divisor of two integers.
* Note: gcd(0,0) will returm 0 and print an error message
* @param a the first integer
* @param b the second integer
* @return the greatest common divisor of a and b
*/

long gcd(long a, long b);

#endif

gcd.cc

#include "gcd.h"
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

long gcd(long a, long b) {

// if a and b are both zero, print an error and return 0
if ( (a==0) && (b==0) ) {
cerr << "WARNING: gcd called with both arguments equal to zero."
<< endl;
return 0;
}

// make sure a and b are both positive
if (a<0) {
a = -a;
}
if (b<0) {
b = -b;
}

// if a is zero, the answer is b
if (a==0) {
return b;
}

// otherwise check all possibilities from 1 to a

long d; // d holds the answer

for (long t=1; t<=a; t++) {
if ( (a%t==0) && (b%t==0) ) {
d = t;
}
}

return d;
}

gcd-tester.cc

#include "gcd.h"
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

/**
* Evaluates the gcd procedure
*/

int main() {
long a,b;

cout << "Enter the first denominator --> ";
cin >> a;
cout << "Enter the second denominator --> ";
cin >> b;

cout << "The gcd of " << a << " and " << b << " is "
<< gcd(a,b) << endl;
return 0;

}

I've done checked the code a few times, and it's copied exactly from what's in the book. From what little I know about C++, I don't think the code is the problem. I do think that the way I'm compiling it through g++ may be an issue. Any suggestions?


Regards,

Aaron

Arndt
November 7th, 2010, 06:54 PM
This is my first foray into programming. My university requires we take a C++ class, but I haven't gone through it yet. However, I got into a class, numerical analysis and methods, which requires a basic knowledge of C++. Thus I got the book C++ for Mathematicians by Scheinermann to self-study before next semester. I ask you to please be patient... I'm a noob programmer.

I'm in chapter three, and we're writing a program to calculate the GCD of using two known integers. The author says this route is inefficient but that he will continue to refine it. Now, for the error:

aaron@hpdv9005us:~/Documents/C++ Programs$ g++ gcd.cc gcd-tester.cc -o gcd-tester
gcd-tester.cc: In function ‘int main()’:
gcd-tester.cc:18: error: ‘gcd’ was not declared in this scope


Here's the code for the gcd.h, gcd.cc, and gcd-tester.cc:

gcd.h

#ifndef GCD_H
#define GCD_H

/**
* Calculate the greatest common divisor of two integers.
* Note: gcd(0,0) will returm 0 and print an error message
* @param a the first integer
* @param b the second integer
* @return the greatest common divisor of a and b
*/

long gcd(long a, long b);

#endif

gcd.cc

#include "gcd.h"
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

long gcd(long a, long b) {

// if a and b are both zero, print an error and return 0
if ( (a==0) && (b==0) ) {
cerr << "WARNING: gcd called with both arguments equal to zero."
<< endl;
return 0;
}

// make sure a and b are both positive
if (a<0) {
a = -a;
}
if (b<0) {
b = -b;
}

// if a is zero, the answer is b
if (a==0) {
return b;
}

// otherwise check all possibilities from 1 to a

long d; // d holds the answer

for (long t=1; t<=a; t++) {
if ( (a%t==0) && (b%t==0) ) {
d = t;
}
}

return d;
}

gcd-tester.cc

#include "gcd.h"
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

/**
* Evaluates the gcd procedure
*/

int main() {
long a,b;

cout << "Enter the first denominator --> ";
cin >> a;
cout << "Enter the second denominator --> ";
cin >> b;

cout << "The gcd of " << a << " and " << b << " is "
<< gcd(a,b) << endl;
return 0;

}

I've done checked the code a few times, and it's copied exactly from what's in the book. From what little I know about C++, I don't think the code is the problem. I do think that the way I'm compiling it through g++ may be an issue. Any suggestions?


Regards,

Aaron

I guess there is some discrepancy between what you posted and what you tried to compile. When I compile your code, I succeed.

Tony Flury
November 7th, 2010, 10:01 PM
It is definitely not a very efficient method for finding the GCD

in python - I use :



def _gcd(self,a,b):
""" gcd(a,b) - finds the greatest common divisor between a & b
a & b are both non negative Integers
returns a non negative Integer """
if b==0 :
return a
return self._gcd(b,a % b)


the % operator is the modulus operator - I must confess i am not sure why it works - but it does.