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Schrute Farms
October 17th, 2010, 11:09 PM
Quick poll for you all.

I used to leave my computer running all of the time, because the only time I've had hard drives crash is upon startup. I've been turning mine off lately because I'm worried about the CPU fan dying. It, like the fan on my old ATI card, stayed running all the time for the past 5 years, but the fan on the card died. I don't want that to happen to the CPU; no money to fix it.

So, do you leave your computer on all of the time, or do you turn it off at night? Any reasons why?

fatality_uk
October 17th, 2010, 11:16 PM
Unless it's a server, or provides truly required server functions, there's NO reason for a home PC to be on all the time. Apart from the fact that wear and tear is taking place while you are sleeping (pointless) but why spend money and waste electricity having a machine on doing absolutely nothing?

Ctrl-Alt-F1
October 17th, 2010, 11:21 PM
With desktops I don't really care if they're running all the time. They're reliable enough, and if something breaks, I can probably fix it.

With my laptop I turn it off most of the time when I'm not using it (sometimes suspend), because I'm paranoid about dust getting sucked into the fans. I doubt that it helps much, but it's my laptop OCD thing.

It's probably worse for my laptop to be turned on and off all the time, but whatever.

M!K3_$
October 17th, 2010, 11:27 PM
I have a server I leave on all the time, but my desktop and laptop get shut off when not in use.

chriswyatt
October 17th, 2010, 11:29 PM
I pretty much only do when I'm out of the house or I know I'm not gonna use it for a while. Or if I've been staring at the screen for too long and I've knackered myself out, I'll turn it off so I'm not tempted to go browsing on forums again, slight internet addiction.

I probably leave it on more than I should, I need to get into the habit of putting it in standby seeing as Ubuntu supports power management on my laptop a lot better these days. I've got used to never touching suspend on my laptop due to it either not working or crashing my laptop (in both Windows and Ubuntu).

sisco311
October 17th, 2010, 11:36 PM
I'm worried about the CPU fan dying. It, like the fan on my old ATI card, stayed running all the time for the past 5 years, but the fan on the card died. I don't want that to happen to the CPU; no money to fix it.


Check the motherboard's documentation, some BIOSes include CPU overheating protection that can be enabled.

SantaFe
October 18th, 2010, 12:17 AM
Well, I'm running the Windows F@H SMP client (under WINE) on my Linux box so I do leave it on 24/7.

Khakilang
October 18th, 2010, 05:54 AM
I usually left it run overnight when I am downloading something like a Distro I want to test and only when I am around. I don't it leave unattended. And also I don't want to come back and smell something burning and it is not from the kitchen.

lisati
October 18th, 2010, 06:04 AM
I leave my main "desktop" on 24/7 to serve up web pages and to tend to email.

matsuzine
October 18th, 2010, 06:55 AM
I've heard there's some reason to believe that booting is a fairly damaging process, when cool components are suddenly being taxed. Components that stay on do not have this heating and cooling.

In fact, every machine I've had fail has pooped out during the boot process. On the other hand, seems kind of unnecessary to just leave it on, doesn't it?

NightwishFan
October 18th, 2010, 06:57 AM
I never leave my computer on unless it has a purpose. I certainly do not leave it on when I am not around. I do have some remote servers, however they are not up all the time either. (Max 6-7 days).

foxmulder881
October 18th, 2010, 07:01 AM
1 x linux desktop all the time. 24/7 Reason: always downloading stuff
1 x bsd server all the time. 24/7 Reason: server, doing stuff.

Sxynerd
October 18th, 2010, 07:11 AM
My desktop never gets shut off unless there is something in the updates that makes me restart. My monitors are turned off whenever I am not in front of the computer.

My last XP desktop was left on for nearly a year straight without updates and without ever being turned off. It was just always on and used for Word/Internet and I think porn by my dirty little brother.

It proved my point of Windows only has problems when it's creators try and make it better. lol. I think that PC was 7 years old. Sold it for $150 at a garage sale. :0)

slooksterpsv
October 18th, 2010, 07:12 AM
I don't leave my computers on just due to power bills. Now in the winter, sometimes I'll leave my big desktop on doing various things so I can get warm if it's cold ;). Other than that, turn it off, conserve.

Sxynerd
October 18th, 2010, 07:18 AM
I don't leave my computers on just due to power bills. Now in the winter, sometimes I'll leave my big desktop on doing various things so I can get warm if it's cold ;). Other than that, turn it off, conserve.

I have never been able to decipher any difference in power bills from leaving on a computer.


Is there any electrical math guru's on here that can calculate usage for a 350 or 400watt pwr supply over a years time? (IDK how we'd match Monitor usage since there are so many different types.)

Too me it seems like there would be too many variables to count but any way we could get a general number?

NightwishFan
October 18th, 2010, 07:21 AM
If I am able to get my hands on this it certainly will be up most of the time. I could have 100 uses for this as a server:
http://www.system76.com/product_info.php?cPath=27&products_id=91

Rasa1111
October 18th, 2010, 07:33 AM
when I had windows (xp), My computer stayed on more than I shut it down,
simply because the boot/shutdown times were beyond absolutely ridiculous. :mad:

So, I would just keep it on most times.
Saved me from having to find *multiple* other things to do when all I wanted to do was simply start or shutdown my PC. lol

But now that i use Ubuntu..
I shut down my PC almost every night.

10-12 seconds, Fully booted...
5-6 seconds.. fully shut down. lol :D

Sometimes Im too tired and pass out without shutting it down,
but most nights it does get shut down now.

funny, most of the people i know that ive switched to ubuntu,
have told me the same thing,
that they never used to shut down their PC because windows would take far too long to shut down and boot back up...

but now they have also been shutting them down whenever they want , because Ubuntu actually freakin works! lol :D

<3

Legeril
October 18th, 2010, 07:51 AM
Since I've made the switch to Linux I tend to turn my computer off a lot more, Windows XP just took so damn long to turn of and boot up. Though I suppose I should turn my laptop off more but most of the time I fall asleep while watching something or am downloading something heavy during the night.

ctrlmd
October 18th, 2010, 08:08 AM
i shut down all laptops.desktops at night cause it doesn't do something useful at night when everyone sleeping beside its waste of money/electricity to keep it running for no reason.

ssam
October 18th, 2010, 09:06 AM
no for desktop/laptop. yes for my beagleboard server, it only uses about 2 watts.

Grenage
October 18th, 2010, 09:16 AM
I used to, but now we're 'Efficiency Nazi's'. Go Godwin's Law!

A group of us pay a small amount each for a download/upload server at a datacentre in London; so we don't need our machines on unless we're using them, or pulling off the server.

As for wear and tear from booting a computer - it's negligible. The money saved from not leaving the machine on, would pay for a new computer every two years (at least, in my circumstances).

Modern computers are a lot more efficient than older kit.

Paqman
October 18th, 2010, 09:33 AM
Is there any electrical math guru's on here that can calculate usage for a 350 or 400watt pwr supply over a years time? (IDK how we'd match Monitor usage since there are so many different types.)

Too me it seems like there would be too many variables to count but any way we could get a general number?

Not much guruism required. It all depends on how much power your machine draws on average. Lets take a conservative estimate and say your machine idles at about 100W. Over a year that will be 24 x 365.25 = 8766 hours, for 876.6kWh. Multiply that by whatever you pay per kWh (it'll be on your power bill) and you've got the cost.

I pay about 13p/kWh in the UK, so it'd cost me about 114 a year to leave a 100W machine on all the time. Which is why I always turn my machines off when they're not in use, except for my NAS which is ARM-powered and only uses about 8W.

One thing to bear in mind is that PC PSUs continue to draw about 5W when the machine is off. If that bothers you you'll need to turn the computer off at the wall or the switch on the PSU.

id1337x
October 18th, 2010, 09:48 AM
Thanks to Ubuntu I now do.

VinDSL
October 18th, 2010, 10:13 AM
So, do you leave your computer on all of the time, or do you turn it off at night? Any reasons why?I turn my computers off at night.

This machine has a P4EE flamethrower in it. Doubles as a space heater... :P

jespdj
October 18th, 2010, 10:13 AM
I switch it on only when I'm going to use it, and when I'm done, I switch it off (completely off - I don't even put it in sleep mode).

I do the same thing with my desktop and with my laptop. Some people leave their MacBook Pro on all the time, just closing the lid (which puts it into sleep mode). I don't, I switch it off. Mac OS X boots very quickly, just like Ubuntu, so I don't have to wait long for it to start up.

AoSteve
October 18th, 2010, 10:26 AM
Three wild machine stories..

Win98se/Mandriva machine.. Only rebooted; never powered down. Pentium 3 450mhz Katmai clocked to 633mhz on an intel 440bx based mobo. The first time I shut it down (moving) it never powered back up, Processor took a crap after over 5 years running nearly 200mhz over spec. Never had a lockup either, guess the cooling of the chip is what did her in.

Athlon XP 1700+ based system ran with Win XP/Ubuntu for .. well 4years straight stock clock and then three more. Never updated XP and it was solid. Ubuntu (I broke it often LOL). Only one time was it ever "powered down" and the main HDD in that system is in this one. The smart data as of now is showing almost 9 years of runtime. WD800JBSE! Rock the first 8mb cache drive LOL

This machine has seen it's fair share of full power downs though. The XP system may have been powered down three times in it's life. Still operational (though I don't use it at all).

I consider startup on a cold boot is the hardest time a PC has. However, I have seen an HDD fail while a system was running so I can't say whether or not startup affects an HDD as much.

bigseb
October 18th, 2010, 10:27 AM
I switch mine off. A) cos its a laptop B) cos it travels every where with me C) its a real waste on natural resources to leave it on. D) it a real waste of money to leave it on E) An 'off' PC is a safe PC

Sylslay
October 18th, 2010, 10:44 AM
No,
becosue it take 15sec to shoutdown and about 1min to bootup,

and mine is old one,

No, becosuse is
no need to be on all the time,

No becosuse LAPTOP IS AN ELECITRICAL DEVICE!!!!

and if battery blow up (belive it happen) is a FIREE RISK FOR HOUSE AND HOUSEMATE. :-)

undecim
October 18th, 2010, 01:08 PM
No thanks, I don't like big power bills.

I have 1 server that stays on all the time, but that's it. I have a local cloud setup where I store files, download torrents, etc on that server, so it's the only thing that needs to stay running.

samalex
October 18th, 2010, 03:30 PM
My primary computer is my laptop which gets turned off each time I'm done. I guess in the strictest meaning of the word 'computer' I use my DroidX for most things now'days while away from work, and it is on all the time, but I figured you guys were talking more about full computers :)

NJC
October 18th, 2010, 05:48 PM
When Suspend is working properly (which after upgrade to 10.10 it isn't) then I use it. Or shut off completely. Considering I can use the extra generated heat to warm the house, it is not wasted even if left on.

Tharkun
October 18th, 2010, 06:19 PM
I'm not willing to pay the cost of having it on all the time so it makes sense to save money.

markp1989
October 18th, 2010, 06:40 PM
my server/torrentslave stays on all the time, uses about 40w at idle.

everything else turned off at night

I used to keep my desktop on to fold, but i stopped that in the summer because my room was too hot to sleep in, so i turned of everything i could. leaving only the server and the hub on.

now winter is here, im gona start folding again (as soon as i can run the smp client in 10.10 properly) will be interesting to see how many ppd my new desktop pulls in.

RandomJoe
October 18th, 2010, 11:42 PM
I have been on a "power reduction" kick as well. I have three servers that stay on 24x7. One is an OpenRD Client ARM board that draws 7W, the other two are Mac Minis (one PPC, one C2D, both running Debian) which run around 15-20W. So 47W at the high end, those replaced standard desktops of various ages that totaled around 250-300W.

Everything else goes off. My home systems - netbook, laptop, desktop running Linux or OS X - are put to sleep. The HTPC is shut off completely - I don't use it every day.

My work laptop is also turned off completely, always had bad luck trying sleep/suspend in Windows years ago and just never bothered to change the habit. I now have Win7 for work, probably would be fine... Maybe I'll try it again someday!

andymorton
October 18th, 2010, 11:48 PM
On a usual day I switch it on soon after I wake up in the morning and switch it off just before I go to bed at night. It's very rare that I use the suspend or hibernate functions.

andy

Spice Weasel
October 18th, 2010, 11:48 PM
Only if I'm downloading something or running Bleachbit.

cartman640
October 19th, 2010, 12:50 AM
I have two desktops (my custom built quad core and an iMac). Both of these machines are put to sleep at night, so only draw about 3w each and are powered on in the morning when I get up.

I also have two servers, and old Athlon XP for my firewall which doesn't draw much, and the file server, running an Athlon X2 2.7GHz and nine drives (and no, they don't spin down). Both of these servers are on 24/7.

The one thing I have done is ensured that all of my machines run power supplies with high efficiency (~85% across most of their load range). Not cheap to buy, but they do reduce power consumption slightly, run cooler and last much longer.

cj.surrusco
October 19th, 2010, 02:00 AM
My headless server is always on, but extreme low power settings (only uses about 65 watts). My desktop is shut off at night, no need to waste electricity, especially since I have a 15 sec boot time.

Windows Nerd
October 19th, 2010, 03:31 AM
I turn my computers off at night.

This machine has a P4EE flamethrower in it. Doubles as a space heater... :P

I have a P4 too. Darn those things run hot, especially in an OEM case with crappy airflow. And I wanted to overclock it, back 5 months ago when I picked up the machine...not a chance with this chip.

CharlesA
October 19th, 2010, 03:37 AM
Server is on 24/7.
Desktop is put to sleep/suspend when I am not using it.
Netbook is put to sleep/suspend if I am not using it, but only shutdown when I am going to pack it up.

cj.surrusco
October 19th, 2010, 03:39 AM
I have a P4 too. Darn those things run hot, especially in an OEM case with crappy airflow. And I wanted to overclock it, back 5 months ago when I picked up the machine...not a chance with this chip.
+1
My server is a P4, keeps my room 3-4F warmer than the rest of the house. It's nice in the winter, though, because it keeps my feet warm :)

VinDSL
October 19th, 2010, 09:53 AM
I have a P4 too. Darn those things run hot, especially in an OEM case with crappy airflow. And I wanted to overclock it, back 5 months ago when I picked up the machine...not a chance with this chip.
+1
My server is a P4, keeps my room 3-4F warmer than the rest of the house. It's nice in the winter, though, because it keeps my feet warm :)

Here are a couple of pics of my primary rig...


(On the bench | initial bench-build | Mountain Mods Mobo Tray)

http://vindsl.com/images/vindsl-cooler-0.jpg



(On the bench | 24 hr burn-in)

http://vindsl.com/images/vindsl-cooler-1.jpg


(Mounted in Mountain Mods U2-UFO Opti-1203 case)

http://vindsl.com/images/vindsl-cooler-2.jpg


That Tuniq Tower 120 cooler isn't for looks!

It boots to desktop @ 3.96 GHz -- 3.8 GHz benchmark stable. But, I run it @ 3.4 GHz most of the time.

Anyway, this thing puts out some heat. It's the P4EE vs my Air Conditioner.

At night, here in dusty Arizona, the A/C (8 wW) takes priority... ;)

VinDSL
October 19th, 2010, 08:21 PM
BTW, you didn't ask, but...

I leave my LAN/WAN up 24/7/365. ;)

(Click image for full-size view)


http://vindsl.com/images/qwest-uptime-19-oct-2010(550x413).png (http://vindsl.com/images/qwest-uptime-19-oct-2010.png)

Uptime: 87 days ;)

Cavsfan
October 19th, 2010, 08:36 PM
I leave mine on 24/7 and always have. The monitor turns off after 30 minutes and the PC goes into sleep mode after an hour.
So, it is using very little electricity. Plus there is this argument for leaving it on all the time; turning it on and off somehow stresses
the computer's components. I have a 1TB USB green drive that recommends leaving it on due to the above argument.

Frogs Hair
October 19th, 2010, 08:41 PM
No need to , it may even save some rpms on the CPU and GPU fans.

oldsoundguy
October 19th, 2010, 08:44 PM
On .. all 7 of them. But all are running BOINC programs, so all is not wasted! Computing for science!!

perspectoff
October 19th, 2010, 08:48 PM
Older desktops had 300W power supplies.

that's like leaving three very bright lightbulbs burning 24/7.

Never, greener computers might be able to run on 100 W or even 85 W.

To tell you the truth, that is more power than an entire room of fluorescent lights in my house.

Green computing is very important. Global warming is occurring in an exponential fashion, as is energy consumption, largely predicated on the number of electronic devices we are using.

Hey, I drive a Prius, have solar panels, and have set every computer to auto-shutoff.

I have had only one hard drive failure in 20 years, and the cost of a backup hard drive is far less than the power consumed from leaving computers on. (Servers, of course, are the exception).

Even servers can be shut down and re-started in companies, for example, that have no night-time or weekend activity. However, I agree with the post that indicates that monitors are the biggest waste of power, when left on.

There are standalone hard drives that consume very little power, but not when the entire computer is left on in order to run them. I happen to use such a standalone NAS hard drive for my LAN, but even that gets turned off on weekends when the company is closed. I don't believe the assertion that turning on and off the device causes more wear and tear than constant usage.

perspectoff
October 19th, 2010, 09:01 PM
On .. all 7 of them. But all are running BOINC programs, so all is not wasted! Computing for science!!

Kudos!

as2000
October 19th, 2010, 09:28 PM
No need to restart! :P

NightwishFan
October 19th, 2010, 09:31 PM
Kudos!

I respect and for the most part agree with your dedication and insights into power management. :)

fancypiper
October 19th, 2010, 09:41 PM
I leave the computer (desktop and server) on and I just turn the monitor off if I am not activly using it.

Onoku
October 20th, 2010, 03:50 AM
I have been scared by people who supposedly know more about computers than I do telling me that powering it up every day takes its toll on a computer. Thus, I rarely shut down my PC. I should probably just save money on electricity and shut it down. My power bill has been pissing me off as of late and I am sure the computer has been contributing. (though the a/c is the big culprit.. but in Georgia it's necessary)

Kdar
October 20th, 2010, 03:52 AM
Only my HTPC.

libssd
October 20th, 2010, 04:18 AM
I'm afraid I just don't understand the "power saving" arguments to turning a machine off. In suspend, power usage is minimal. With my netbook, I simply close the lid when I'm not using it; overnight, if not plugged in, the battery drops by about 5%, which is pretty minimal. If I expect to be away from a power source for an extended period of time, I turn it off; otherwise, it's always on.

Same with my desktop iMac, which also uses very little power in sleep mode.

Messyhair42
October 20th, 2010, 05:12 AM
I leave mine running all the time because I'm running Prime 95 (under wine of course), also a great program for testing the hardware

oscarivera9
December 12th, 2011, 11:44 AM
I have a dual boot system with Ubuntu and Windows. If I am using Ubuntu, I leave my computer on Suspend when I'm not using it. If I'm using Windows I leave it on Stand-By whenever I'm not using it. I usually turn the PC off about 2-3 times per week, usually at night, and especially if I want to use a different OS. Since both systems usually have some sort of updates at least once a week, I make it a point to switch operating systems at least once a week, so as to maintain my computer updated regardless of OS.

Linuxratty
December 12th, 2011, 05:14 PM
Only when I'm using it.

MBybee
December 12th, 2011, 05:51 PM
My "desktop" is always on, though usually hibernated. It has no moving parts to speak of (no spinning disk drives, fans, etc), unless I put a CD in there.

My tablet is what I use 99% of the time, and it's always on.

My laptop gets powered off/on as needed, but its life is almost strictly M-F these days. The tablet replaced all of its functions with the exception of some heavy work apps (like SAP).

bobsageek
December 12th, 2011, 07:03 PM
I let all my computers sleep after 1 hour.

teward
December 12th, 2011, 07:05 PM
I've got 4 computers... which one do you mean? :P

Laptop AlwaysOn = no
Netbook AlwaysOn = yes
Desktop AlwaysOn = no
Server AlwaysOn = yes

CompyTheInsane
December 12th, 2011, 08:01 PM
My gaming rig: No (Takes up 100-150 watts)
Primary laptop: Not all the time, but I do keep it on all night to let Folding@Home do its crunching.
My Laptop-as-a-server: Yes because its primary role is DNS. It also runs Folding@Home 24/7 (or close to it) in the fall/winter.

VinDSL
December 12th, 2011, 08:10 PM
My gaming rig: No (Takes up 100 watts)
This (circa 2005) gaming rig takes 200 watts -- tested it using a P3 Kill A Watt meter.

Wife's machine uses 150 watts.

While these machines make dandy "space heaters" in the winter, they tend to drive up the electric bill, so I turn them both off, at bedtime.

sandyd
December 12th, 2011, 09:40 PM
Desktop: Never shuts off. After the first HD died, I replaced it with four SAS disks in RAID 10. Hasn't shut off ever since. (SAS Disks are made to be on 24/7...)

Laptop: Suspends when I close the lid. It only shuts down whenever I need to bring it onto a plane or something.

LinuxFan999
December 12th, 2011, 11:17 PM
I always turn my computers off when I am done using them for the day, in order to save energy.

RealityMaster
December 12th, 2011, 11:33 PM
I leave all my systems on, I just like to be able to use them whenever I want to, without waiting. This is going to change this spring though, I'm going off-grid with solar panels and vawt, so I'm going to have to start conserving.

guyver_dio
December 13th, 2011, 01:20 AM
My main machine was built as a gaming machine but it's a bit out-dated, but it still uses a tonne of energy so I do turn it off every night. That and I like to tinker with application and settings which is one of the reasons I use ubuntu because basically anything can be tinkered with, and when you do stuff like on any OS things tend to lag up and start behaving strange, so restarting a machine is essential.

My other pc is a home theater pc which I built to be green, it's fairly energy efficient and it doesn't get messed around with, it's basically there to browse the net and watch videos/listen to music. It'll go into hibernation when we're not using it so I don't mind leaving it running.

Old_Grey_Wolf
December 13th, 2011, 01:39 AM
I know this is an old thread; however, I will post in it anyway.

I have six (6) computers in my home at the moment.

Four (4) of them are netbooks, notebooks, and laptops. Those are powered off when not in use.

I have two (2) desktops.

One of the desktops is used for experimenting and learning; therefore, I power it off when I'm not using it.

The other desktop is used as a server for things like print server, file server, backup, and so on. This server is powered on all the time.

wolfen69
December 13th, 2011, 07:44 AM
I seed a few ubuntu iso's 24/7/365.

Bodsda
December 13th, 2011, 07:50 AM
My home PC has a longer uptime then any of my servers at work

Lucradia
December 13th, 2011, 07:50 AM
I turn off my computer by using the shutdown flag on windows / linux if I am to leave for an hour or more, if I am not torrenting, or AFK training on something.

morgan141
December 13th, 2011, 11:16 AM
No, I do try to turn my computer off as much as possible. Sometimes I have to leave it on overnight for work purposes (running simulation stuff)

dpny
December 13th, 2011, 05:03 PM
The machines don't get turned off, but they get put to sleep when not in use. If I'm going on vacation and I know I'll be gone for a couple of days, they get turned off.

mr-woof
December 13th, 2011, 10:46 PM
I still run seti@home on this pc, so it can be on for a day or two but generally it's turned off, same with my ESXI test environment PC.

lukjad007
December 13th, 2011, 10:55 PM
Used to. I had a small desktop/server that I left running. Then I got my electrical bill. I stopped doing that now.

MBybee
December 14th, 2011, 05:16 PM
Used to. I had a small desktop/server that I left running. Then I got my electrical bill. I stopped doing that now.

I keep seeing this comment - do you really see a big difference?

I tried this once as an experiment (with a spare machine), basically one full billing cycle I left it on, then off the next.

There was essentially no difference between the two months' bills - it was like $3 less the month I had it on.

weasel fierce
December 14th, 2011, 05:17 PM
Pretty much all the time, unless we're going to be out of town or something.

Paqman
December 14th, 2011, 05:29 PM
I keep seeing this comment - do you really see a big difference?

I tried this once as an experiment (with a spare machine), basically one full billing cycle I left it on, then off the next.

There was essentially no difference between the two months' bills - it was like $3 less the month I had it on.

Depends on how power hungry the machine is.

Here in the UK electricity is about 13p per kWh. So leaving a 100W PC on all day compared to running it four hours a day is a difference of about 2kWh (or 26p) per day. So turning it off would give you an extra 100 to spend on booze, food and presents for your loved ones every Xmas.

No brainer really, and energy prices will only go up.

Personally I've just bought a KVM so I can use my netbook more comfortably at my desk. There's no point in firing up my desktop for 90% of what I find myself using it for. The netbook will browse the web nearly as well as the desktop for 90% less power.

Cavsfan
December 14th, 2011, 06:58 PM
My monitor goes to sleep after 1/2 an hour of no keyboard/mouse activity - 3 Watts in sleep mode.
The PC goes to sleep after an hour of no keyboard/mouse activity - minimal wattage.

I have a 1 TB USB drive that spins down when the PC is asleep and I would prefer to leave that on rather than risk the power on/off issues.

So, mine stays on 24/7 and always will. My electricity bill is low.

I dual boot and leave it in windows 7 over night as my gamer son is last on it. The last time I let it go to sleep in Lucid, there were so many issues, I had to reboot.

Roasted
December 14th, 2011, 07:22 PM
In an effort to be better with energy consumption, I've started suspending all of my systems. The only system that stays running 247 is my file server. I justify that based on the fact I picked low powered hardware for that file system so I know, despite it running 247, it's barely sipping energy, unlike some other systems I have that now spend a lot of time in suspend mode.

lukjad007
December 14th, 2011, 08:48 PM
I keep seeing this comment - do you really see a big difference?

I tried this once as an experiment (with a spare machine), basically one full billing cycle I left it on, then off the next.

There was essentially no difference between the two months' bills - it was like $3 less the month I had it on.
For me it was about a 50% increase in my bill.

Cavsfan
December 14th, 2011, 09:24 PM
For me it was about a 50% increase in my bill.

Do your monitor and PC not go into sleep mode? I have been reluctant to allow sleep mode in Ubuntu but, windows 7 does an excellent job.
I was wanting my PC to stay awake to defrag my C: drive to avoid taking almost 2 days of my life to do so. (Time I will never get back)

Even though it was doing some intense disk activity, it still went to sleep because no mouse/keyboard activity. :(

I know Ubuntu does not fragment or at least it's no problem. But, windows slows considerably.
Which is why there are good and bad things about both; the prime reason I dual boot.

MBybee
December 14th, 2011, 11:52 PM
Depends on how power hungry the machine is.

Here in the UK electricity is about 13p per kWh. So leaving a 100W PC on all day compared to running it four hours a day is a difference of about 2kWh (or 26p) per day. So turning it off would give you an extra 100 to spend on booze, food and presents for your loved ones every Xmas.

No brainer really, and energy prices will only go up.


Holy moly - we pay betwen 7-10 cents(US) per kWh. I'll plug a kill-a-watt into my machine, see what it uses.

Old_Grey_Wolf
December 15th, 2011, 03:57 AM
For me it was about a 50% increase in my bill.


Depends on how power hungry the machine is.

Here in the UK electricity is about 13p per kWh. So leaving a 100W PC on all day compared to running it four hours a day is a difference of about 2kWh (or 26p) per day. So turning it off would give you an extra 100 to spend on booze, food and presents for your loved ones every Xmas.

No brainer really, and energy prices will only go up.

...

lukjad007,

That's about 100 watts x 24 hours x 365 days/yr = 876,000 watt-hours, or 876 kilowatt-hours. If you're paying 13p per kWh that is about 114 per year. Is my math wrong? Considering all the other appliances using power in my home that doesn't seem like much of an additional cost. At least nothing like 50%. 50% would mean that the only electricity I use all year is two 50W light bulbs burning 24*7*365 a year.

MoonLitOwl
December 15th, 2011, 04:25 AM
The only time I'd every leave my laptop on is if I'm downloading something. Otherwise I turn it off at the end of the day. Don't see the point in wasting energy. :D

VinDSL
December 15th, 2011, 08:04 AM
Do your monitor and PC not go into sleep mode?
I hooked up a P3 Kill A Watt meter to my PC (see sig), and my wife's, and "sleep mode", so called, only made an 8-10 watt reduction on either machine, e.g. 5-10% reduction.

Truthfully, that was the biggest shocker (for me) of all the testing I did, of various household items.

I digress (two other shockers)... my microwave uses over 2000 watts (UL rated @ 1600 watts), but my 25 cu. ft. refrigerator only uses 160 watts (about the same as my desktop machines), but, on topic...

Sleep Mode didn't save jack, on electricity, on my two primary machines!

That said, my 15.6-inch lappy only used 65 watts WFO (battery removed, on AC power). That's the penny-pincher of my rigs...

malspa
December 15th, 2011, 08:10 AM
I leave mine on while I'm home, including overnight. I turn it off when I'm gonna be away from home for awhile, like when I go to work.

Paqman
December 15th, 2011, 09:01 AM
I hooked up a P3 Kill A Watt meter to my PC (see sig), and my wife's, and "sleep mode", so called, only made an 8-10 watt reduction on either machine, e.g. 5-10% reduction.


That's odd. Laptop or desktop, and if a laptop was it charging?

I know on my desktop it uses about 100W when in light use, about 6W when off, and only 7W when asleep. So I'm quite happy to suspend it when not in use.

It can be really interesting to do a power audit around the house. With devices like fridges you'd want to leave your meter plugged in for 24 hours to get the total kWh and average it to get a meaningful figure in watts, as the compressor only runs intermittantly.

VinDSL
December 15th, 2011, 09:17 AM
I know on my desktop it uses [...] about 6W when off [...]
Me too! LoL!

This machine uses 7W when it's turned off.

I think they call that parasitic drain, e.g. uses power, even when it's turned off.

So, technically speaking, I suppose I do leave my computer on all the time, even after I turn it off. :D

Paqman
December 15th, 2011, 09:43 AM
Me too! LoL!

This machine uses 7W when it's turned off.

I think they call that parasitic drain, e.g. uses power, even when it's turned off.

So, technically speaking, I suppose I do leave my computer on all the time, even after I turn it off. :D

Yep. A lot of devices draw power on standby. It's not a lot of power, but it can add up. If you're serious about getting your consumption down it is one of the low-hanging fruit, as there's a simple technical solution.

You can get a gizmo that you can plug several devices into that has one master socket. When it detects that the master device has gone into standby it completely cuts the juice to the peripherals. It's good for TVs that have DVD players, etc attached, and PCs that have printers, external drives, etc. Depending on the exact device you might still have the vampire load of the master device, but you lose that of all the peripheral ones.

I'm a huge fan of automated power saving measures, because like most people I'm lazy.

MBybee
December 15th, 2011, 04:35 PM
Yep. A lot of devices draw power on standby. It's not a lot of power, but it can add up. If you're serious about getting your consumption down it is one of the low-hanging fruit, as there's a simple technical solution.

You can get a gizmo that you can plug several devices into that has one master socket. When it detects that the master device has gone into standby it completely cuts the juice to the peripherals. It's good for TVs that have DVD players, etc attached, and PCs that have printers, external drives, etc. Depending on the exact device you might still have the vampire load of the master device, but you lose that of all the peripheral ones.

I'm a huge fan of automated power saving measures, because like most people I'm lazy.

We have severe thunderstorms, so I use this sort of thing a lot. Basically everything goes onto an extension cord, and that cord is always unplugged when not in use.

Makes life easier when a storm comes in and you disconnect only a few cables :)

So - I ran a kill-a-watt on my machine to measure it. I get 0.01 kwH per hour (two hours of normal work use tested). The device is known to have a +- 1w accuracy, but my machine is still using 15-20W on average (when I am looking down at the meter next to me here).

Accessing the CD spikes it up almost to 30.

The biggest power sink is my Marshall Stack, which truly lives up to it's power rating :)
That's never plugged in except when in use, of course.

Paqman
December 15th, 2011, 04:47 PM
the biggest power sink is my marshall stack, which truly lives up to it's power rating :)


11?

MBybee
December 15th, 2011, 04:59 PM
11?
:guitar:

lukjad007
December 15th, 2011, 08:18 PM
Do your monitor and PC not go into sleep mode? I have been reluctant to allow sleep mode in Ubuntu but, windows 7 does an excellent job.
I was wanting my PC to stay awake to defrag my C: drive to avoid taking almost 2 days of my life to do so. (Time I will never get back)

Even though it was doing some intense disk activity, it still went to sleep because no mouse/keyboard activity. :(

I know Ubuntu does not fragment or at least it's no problem. But, windows slows considerably.
Which is why there are good and bad things about both; the prime reason I dual boot.

I always turned off my monitor when going to bed, but I left my PC on 24/7. Also, this was acting as a webserver and a irc logger and game server.


lukjad007,

That's about 100 watts x 24 hours x 365 days/yr = 876,000 watt-hours, or 876 kilowatt-hours. If you're paying 13p per kWh that is about 114 per year. Is my math wrong? Considering all the other appliances using power in my home that doesn't seem like much of an additional cost. At least nothing like 50%. 50% would mean that the only electricity I use all year is two 50W light bulbs burning 24*7*365 a year.

My monthly bill was something like $60 (they were split over the year) and jumped to $90 because of this. Of course, I can't *prove* it's solely because of this, but it still was a huge spike. I turned it off and after a year my bills went back to $60 or so. I know that correlation does not imply causation, but it does suggest a link.

MBybee
December 15th, 2011, 08:44 PM
Ok - still on the kill-a-watt test here, after a half day of solid work (using a VM, multiple apps, etc):
.1 kwh showing.
That's with 5.5 hours on the clock at this point.

I will leave it on overnight, but I'm guessing that this machine will be using under 2 kwh a day, or less than 20 cents.

That's $73 a year, assuming I never turn it off.
I can live with that. My xbox is only on a few hours at a time and uses WAY more power.

CharlesA
December 15th, 2011, 08:48 PM
Me too! LoL!

This machine uses 7W when it's turned off.

I think they call that parasitic drain, e.g. uses power, even when it's turned off.

So, technically speaking, I suppose I do leave my computer on all the time, even after I turn it off. :D

According to the UPS I have, when my PC is asleep (and the monitor and speakers turn off) it uses around 6 watts of power. Not too bad imo.

Is there a way to convert watts to KWH? The display on my UPS only has Watts and apcupsd doesn't exactly tell me energy usage.

EDIT: Nevermind, I found an explanation here: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_do_you_convert_kW_to_kWh

Methinks I will need to do some math later.

Paqman
December 16th, 2011, 07:22 PM
Is there a way to convert watts to KWH?

It's kWh. KWH would be kelvin watt henrys, which would be an odd unit indeed ;)

kWh = kilowatt hour. 1000 watts for 1 hour, or 1 watt for 1000 hours, etc. Technically energy use should be in joules (1kWh = 3.6MJ) but the kWh is a handy way to be billed, because it's easy to relate to the rate of use.

N00b-un-2
December 16th, 2011, 07:38 PM
My netbook is the only computer I have that ever gets turned off for more than a reboot and only because I don't want to kill the battery, not that its really an issue since I can get 8 hours on a full charge. I have an HTPC/MythTV box attached to my TV, a desktop with massive storage which doubles as a file server. I have a cheapie android tablet which usually gets used for the kids to play angry birds on or it acts as a MythTV remote, and two Android phones. The way I see it, computers are internet devices and are designed to be always on. I ssh, sftp, vnc, etc. to my home computers when I'm out and about ALL the time so if my computers are ever turned off, it's because the power went out. In this day and age I see no reason to turn the computers off, as computer energy consumption is extremely minimal. Running the microwave for thirty seconds to heat up a cup of coffee or taking a shower uses far more elecricity than running all of the computers, modems, routers, printers, etc. in my house all day long. True story.

Paqman
December 16th, 2011, 08:12 PM
Running the microwave for thirty seconds to heat up a cup of coffee or taking a shower uses far more elecricity than running all of the computers, modems, routers, printers, etc. in my house all day long. True story.

Er, you might want to check your maths. Most microwaves are about 800W, so running one for 30s would consume about 0.007kWh. Any device that could go for 24h while only consuming that much would have to be sucking about 0.3W. If you can run a household full of computers for 0.3W, I'll eat any hat you care to pick.

Taking a shower would use a fair bit more energy than running a microwave. To heat 40 litres of water by 40 degrees would take about 1.85kWh, which would be equivalent to a device using 77W for 24h. 77W would be equivalent to a couple of laptops plus a router, etc, or a single very efficient desktop.

You'll probably find your computers and associated devices are consuming about 6kWh a day from what you've said. So that would be equivalent to running your microwave for 7.5 hours, taking 3 showers, driving a fairly efficient car for about 9km, or getting an oldschool Chevy Impala to the end of the driveway.

CharlesA
December 16th, 2011, 08:42 PM
It's kWh. KWH would be kelvin watt henrys, which would be an odd unit indeed ;)

kWh = kilowatt hour. 1000 watts for 1 hour, or 1 watt for 1000 hours, etc. Technically energy use should be in joules (1kWh = 3.6MJ) but the kWh is a handy way to be billed, because it's easy to relate to the rate of use.

Lmao. Nice catch.

Thanks for the explanation.

hakermania
December 16th, 2011, 08:57 PM
I'm forced to do so!

MBybee
December 16th, 2011, 09:59 PM
...or getting an oldschool Chevy Impala to the end of the driveway.

My new favorite unit :D

"My laptop consumes less than 1 Impala/Foot"

mamamia88
December 16th, 2011, 09:59 PM
I leave my netbook on pretty much 24/7. I like to wakeup/come home to my favorite podcasts aready downloaded.

N00b-un-2
December 17th, 2011, 05:58 AM
Er, you might want to check your maths. Most microwaves are about 800W, so running one for 30s would consume about 0.007kWh. Any device that could go for 24h while only consuming that much would have to be sucking about 0.3W. If you can run a household full of computers for 0.3W, I'll eat any hat you care to pick.

Okay, you are right. I have a 1600W microwave and even still my statement was a gross exaggeration. My point was that the convenience of having my computers online 24/7 is certainly worth the pennies a day it costs to do so. The fact that I live in Phoenix, AZ and it costs upwards of $20 (American) PER DAY to keep it at 85 degrees inside my house during the summer when it's 120 degrees outside is of far greater concern to me than paying less than $20 a month to keep my computer equipment up and running.

lukjad007
December 17th, 2011, 12:45 PM
Okay, you are right. I have a 1600W microwave and even still my statement was a gross exaggeration. My point was that the convenience of having my computers online 24/7 is certainly worth the pennies a day it costs to do so. The fact that I live in Phoenix, AZ and it costs upwards of $20 (American) PER DAY to keep it at 85 degrees inside my house during the summer when it's 120 degrees outside is of far greater concern to me than paying less than $20 a month to keep my computer equipment up and running.

How do you spend $600 a month on conditioning the house? I mean, that's a lot of money. I spend on average $60 a month for everything...

OrangeCrate
December 17th, 2011, 02:26 PM
Absolutely!

(We also leave all of the lights in the house on 24 hours a day, the refrigerator door is always open in the summer to help cool things off, the oven and the burners are always on in the winter to help warm the house, and the car is always running in the drive way, just in case we need it.)

Paqman
December 17th, 2011, 04:20 PM
the refrigerator door is always open in the summer to help cool things off

You know, it's amazing how many people think this would actually work.

VinDSL
December 17th, 2011, 11:42 PM
How do you spend $600 a month on conditioning the house? I mean, that's a lot of money. I spend on average $60 a month for everything...
That's Phoenix for you... LoL! :D

Many, many, ppl pay that much, or more!

A friend was paying $900/mo for electricity, in the summer months (it was more than his mortgage payment).

Found out he was on a commercial rate. After the utility company switched him to residential rates, he was still paying over $600/mo.

On average, I would *guess that most ppl are paying in the $300-$450 range.

Anyway, on topic, running your PC(s) 24/7 in Phoenix not only costs you extra money, but it heats up rooms needlessly, and makes your living conditions more miserable.

A/C units cycle off n' on, but PCs just keep pumping out the heat...

CharlesA
December 17th, 2011, 11:51 PM
Crickey, I thought $60 a month was bad.

Glad I don't live in AZ.

lisati
December 17th, 2011, 11:52 PM
You know, it's amazing how many people think this would actually work.
Good point. I've met people who think like that, and sometimes they don't get it after a short and to-the-point explanation.

crashed111
December 17th, 2011, 11:55 PM
I leave it on all the time when I am at home however my server (specifically designed for low power usage) stays on all the time.

lisati
December 17th, 2011, 11:56 PM
I leave several of my appliances on at the wall 24/7, including some of my computer gear. I first heard of turning off VCRs etc at the mains as a way of saving money several years ago, but chose not to do it, because (a) I don't like the blinking time, (b) I sometimes like to record shows while I'm out or asleep, and (c) it defeats the purpose of having a remote control.

VinDSL
December 17th, 2011, 11:59 PM
Crickey, I thought $60 a month was bad.

Glad I don't live in AZ.
Depends on where you live, in AZ.

The elevation at my house is 5250 ft (basically a mile high) and the seasons are much milder here. Most times, in the summer, we can get by with window fans.

Flatlanders don't have that option, except for a couple of months out of the year. For the most part, it's either hot or cold in Phoenix, with nothing much in between, e.g. you're either running your A/C or your heater, sometimes in the same day.

Cool Javelin
December 18th, 2011, 03:08 AM
There seems to be some misunderstanding floating around here about power consumption, and boot up stresses.
-----
Power consumption:
If you have a 250W power supply in your desktop, it is pretty much guaranteed your computer does NOT draw 250 watts. Power supplies are rated at peak output and the CW power (the max continuous power) is lower.
-----
Power up/down stress:
Electrical components don't really like being powered on and off, but manufacturers design them to do so and mostly, they are pretty reliable, so that isn't much of an argument.
-----
Thermal Stresses:
It is the thermal stresses that are hard on components. The temperature change causes the tiny wires inside the IC's to flex and sooner or later they will break, but again, manufacturers do take that into account. There are only a limited number of thermal cycles that an IC will do. (That number is in the 10's of thousands). The hotter the component gets the more it flexes and the fewer cycles it can endure.

On the other hand, electrolytic capacitors will dry out if maintained at a high temperature. It is better for them to cool off when not in use.

The boot issues from cold mostly have to do with the diameter of the disk changing from cold to hot. The tracks are in a different place when it is cold then where they were when you wrote to them when warm. There are compensation circuits to handle this but they work better on some hard drives then others.
-----
Hard Drives and Fans:
These components have within them only a certain number of rotations before they fail regardless of powering on or off. To extend the life of these components, power them down. Fans are cheap and they usually make noise before they fail. Hard drives can be expensive and the data on them can be very expensive. For longer life, better to let them stop turning.
-----
Standby, and Hibernation:
In hibernation your computer is off. All power is stopped (except for the tiny bit that goes to the wake up circuit.) In standby most of the power is removed, the only circuit is the memory in low power mode (and, again, the wake up circuit.)

These 2 modes will allow the computer to cool so no change from powering off.
-----
Battery Failure:
One user is worried about the laptop battery failing. In laptops these can catch fire but it doesn't matter if the laptop is on or off. The most likely time will be when you are charging the battery. If you are worried, turn it off and unplug the charger. Even then, there is the risk of failure (quite low). Don't stress it.
-----
So, to power off, or leave on. The simple answer is, :P. OK, there is no simple answer. If you don't have boot issues from cold, go ahead and power it off. If you do, leave it on. The cost is small.
-----
My father has an electrial engineering degree, I have a degree in software, and my brother has 25+ years designing and testing amplifiers. The 3 of us were in business for 15 years making high power amplifiers, and DSP equalizers. So, I do have some knowledge in these areas.

Mark.

BertN45
December 18th, 2011, 03:41 AM
Whatever you choose it will be marginal in the developed world. However I once read that countries like Germany or France could save one power plant, if everybody did turn of the electronics instead of leaving it on stand-by. So from that point of view it is helps the environment turning things off.

I support also the story about the capacitors of the power supply, I used a 10 old HP Vectra VLi8 as file server and this year it could not support the energy demand anymore during booting. The capacitors aged, being ON for at least 6 years all the time. The SFF machine is now powered by an external power supply of another old desktop.

In the country where I live we have a number of power hick-ups/breaks per day and if your computer is off and disconnected, it has a better chance of surviving the years. I lost around 3 desktops for that reason last 6 years, but no laptop yet. I always buy cheap second hand desktops on ebay or computer fairs, that does not hurt so much. A surge protector helps, but not for 100%.

inobe
December 18th, 2011, 05:12 AM
i turn them off, point being, no one is using them and i have to pay an electric bill, heck, i'm counting pennies, not dollars :P

VinDSL
December 18th, 2011, 01:26 PM
i'm counting pennies, not dollars :P
Heh! Smart man!

If you watch your pennies, the dollars will take care of themselves. ;)

smellyman
December 18th, 2011, 03:36 PM
turn everything off, including everything not needed at the office....

pbpersson
December 18th, 2011, 08:24 PM
I turn off my main Ubuntu machine when I leave for work each day to save money because I don't think that hibernation works. I just tried a manual suspend and the computer never came back so I had to cold boot.

The Vista machine is the household file/print/music/TiVo server so that stays on 24/7.

My Windows 7 machine is busy doing work 24/7 so that stays on. The wife's Windows 7 machine goes into hibernate when not in use.

We have an ancient machine running Xubuntu that stays on 24/7, the wife uses that for Linux games. It is so old, I don't think it uses much power.

BBQdave
December 19th, 2011, 03:18 AM
This old dell inspiron 1100 gets really warm when powered on. So much so, that I have a heat absorption pad-shield between it and me.

I only leave it on if it is a really chilly night and I want to warm up :P

73ckn797
December 19th, 2011, 03:49 AM
Two desktop computers stay on 24/7 unless we will be away a few days. One has stayed on almost 24/7 for 4 years now and has experienced no problems My laptop gets turned off at night and sometimes 4-5 times a day. It is at least 4-5 years old. More wear and tear to the laptop since I carry it with me daily.

MBybee
December 19th, 2011, 05:13 AM
Depends on where you live, in AZ.

The elevation at my house is 5250 ft (basically a mile high) and the seasons are much milder here. Most times, in the summer, we can get by with window fans.

Flatlanders don't have that option, except for a couple of months out of the year. For the most part, it's either hot or cold in Phoenix, with nothing much in between, e.g. you're either running your A/C or your heater, sometimes in the same day.

I'm in Phoenix, my highest bill was $125. I think some people have more issues than others depending on building size, build quality, shade, etc. Lot of the ventilation systems around here are badly made, too.

73ckn797
December 19th, 2011, 05:34 AM
There seems to be some misunderstanding floating around here about power consumption, and boot up stresses.
-----
Power consumption:
If you have a 250W power supply in your desktop, it is pretty much guaranteed your computer does NOT draw 250 watts. Power supplies are rated at peak output and the CW power (the max continuous power) is lower.
-----
Power up/down stress:
Electrical components don't really like being powered on and off, but manufacturers design them to do so and mostly, they are pretty reliable, so that isn't much of an argument.
-----
Thermal Stresses:
It is the thermal stresses that are hard on components. The temperature change causes the tiny wires inside the IC's to flex and sooner or later they will break, but again, manufacturers do take that into account. There are only a limited number of thermal cycles that an IC will do. (That number is in the 10's of thousands). The hotter the component gets the more it flexes and the fewer cycles it can endure.

On the other hand, electrolytic capacitors will dry out if maintained at a high temperature. It is better for them to cool off when not in use.

The boot issues from cold mostly have to do with the diameter of the disk changing from cold to hot. The tracks are in a different place when it is cold then where they were when you wrote to them when warm. There are compensation circuits to handle this but they work better on some hard drives then others.
-----
Hard Drives and Fans:
These components have within them only a certain number of rotations before they fail regardless of powering on or off. To extend the life of these components, power them down. Fans are cheap and they usually make noise before they fail. Hard drives can be expensive and the data on them can be very expensive. For longer life, better to let them stop turning.
-----
Standby, and Hibernation:
In hibernation your computer is off. All power is stopped (except for the tiny bit that goes to the wake up circuit.) In standby most of the power is removed, the only circuit is the memory in low power mode (and, again, the wake up circuit.)

These 2 modes will allow the computer to cool so no change from powering off.
-----
Battery Failure:
One user is worried about the laptop battery failing. In laptops these can catch fire but it doesn't matter if the laptop is on or off. The most likely time will be when you are charging the battery. If you are worried, turn it off and unplug the charger. Even then, there is the risk of failure (quite low). Don't stress it.
-----
So, to power off, or leave on. The simple answer is, :P. OK, there is no simple answer. If you don't have boot issues from cold, go ahead and power it off. If you do, leave it on. The cost is small.
-----
My father has an electrial engineering degree, I have a degree in software, and my brother has 25+ years designing and testing amplifiers. The 3 of us were in business for 15 years making high power amplifiers, and DSP equalizers. So, I do have some knowledge in these areas.

Mark.

This is true.

Artemis3
December 19th, 2011, 07:15 PM
I suggest auto suspend after a long inactivity, or before you go to sleep. Resuming is very quick, as opposed to hibernation which i don't like and rather turn off the machine than waiting memory to flush/restore from hard drive (and i don't have swap memory anyway). If you disallow hard drives from shutting down on their own (it takes effort to make them enter power saving with Ubuntu anyway), your drive should be getting 1 power up/down cycle per day which isn't too bad, specially laptop drives.

Remember suspend needs a little power to keep the system state in ram, do not unplug, or you'll boot up from zero afterwards (not terribly bad either). An UPS acts kinda like a laptop battery and with the machine in suspend it can take hours to deplete.

If you have many machines, and you access them remotely, consider leaving a single (low power consumption) router/machine on, and use Wake on Lan from that device to access the others when needed, then suspend or auto-suspend after use. Picture an scenario where you are in holiday with a netbook and need a file from home, you'll rarely need your machines to stay on for days...

t0p
December 19th, 2011, 09:55 PM
I turn on my pc when I want to use it, and I turn it off when I'm pretty sure I won't need to use it again that day.

If I was using the computer as a server, which might need to be accessed at any time, then I'd keep it on all the time. But I don't need it to be on 24/7, and I was raised to be frugal, so I turn it off if I don't need it. Heck, if I've turned it off then suddenly realised I needed it to be on, it's pretty simple to turn it back on. Unless I was off-site, of course, but like I already said: if I might need to access it at any time, it would be on anyway.

Incidentally, I've noticed that on some Usenet newsgroups (especially comp.os.linux.* newsgroups) some posters have their up-time in their sig, like it's a shiny red Ferrari or something. Interesting, from a psychological angle?

CharlesA
December 19th, 2011, 10:06 PM
Incidentally, I've noticed that on some Usenet newsgroups (especially comp.os.linux.* newsgroups) some posters have their up-time in their sig, like it's a shiny red Ferrari or something. Interesting, from a psychological angle?

Nah, just boasting, I guess, since a *nix box is supposed to be able to have a high uptime. Not like anyone else knows or cares. :p

Deuce1912
December 19th, 2011, 11:50 PM
I leave my Desktop and Server on all the time. The only time my Desktop goes off is if I am going to be away from the house for an extended period of time. (Vacation)

My laptop however goes off after I'm done using it, but I mostly use this as my test bed for different OS's and development releases.

- Deuce

rhh7
December 19th, 2011, 11:53 PM
My computer has run 24/7, 365 days per year, since September, 2005.

slooksterpsv
December 20th, 2011, 01:16 AM
My computer has run 24/7, 365 days per year, since September, 2005.

Hmmm an upgrade may be in order. Not sure if you need one, but I suggest it, always nice getting new computers right? =D

CharlesA
December 20th, 2011, 01:23 AM
Hmmm an upgrade may be in order. Not sure if you need one, but I suggest it, always nice getting new computers right? =D
Depends on what it's being used it. ;)

N00b-un-2
December 20th, 2011, 03:36 AM
On average, I would *guess that most ppl are paying in the $300-$450 range.

Yes, this summer was especially bad, one of the hottest years in recent history. Paid just over $550 in August. The crazy thing is now that it's cooler, the AC never comes on and my power bill is down to under $100. Starting in January, now that I've been living in one place for a year, I can get on one of those annual plans where they average your bill out over the months and you pay more like $250 every month.

VinDSL
December 20th, 2011, 07:27 AM
Nah, just boasting, I guess, since a *nix box is supposed to be able to have a high uptime. Not like anyone else knows or cares. :p
We've got a thread, over on AnandTech, concerning uptime. It's bragging rights for nerds, mostly, but...

Some of us are running web sites, and that's a whole different situation.

My production site is located in Atlanta, and it's obviously up 24/7/365.

Here's my current Apache server stats (truncated):


Current Time: Tuesday, 20-Dec-2011 01:36:38 EST
Restart Time: Saturday, 03-Jul-2010 21:20:50 EDT
Parent Server Generation: 6982
Server uptime: 534 days 5 hours 15 minutes 47 seconds
Total accesses: 25503005 - Total Traffic: 47.7 GB
CPU Usage: u13.95 s2.79 cu2746.43 cs0 - .00599% CPU load
.553 requests/sec - 1110 B/second - 2009 B/request
10 requests currently being processed, 6 idle worker

Not bad... I get around 40-80K page views a day, give or take, so I judge it to be stable.

I had to reboot after a kernel update in July, 2010, otherwise, it would be twice that figure. LoL! :D

Anyway, I *guess* we're talking about PCs here (personal computers), yes?!?!? Or not...

VinDSL
December 20th, 2011, 07:34 AM
The crazy thing is now that it's cooler, the AC never comes on and my power bill is down to under $100.
IMO, the crazy thing is, you guys are sitting next to the nation's largest nuclear power plant... and all that 'cheap' electricity is being sold to Cali (and Texas). LoL!

Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palo_Verde_Nuclear_Generating_Station). I can see you glowing from Payson... no kidding!


Located in the Arizona desert, Palo Verde is the only nuclear generating facility in the world that is not situated adjacent to a large body of above-ground water. The facility evaporates water from the treated sewage of several nearby municipalities to meet its cooling needs.

20 billion US gallons (76,000,000 m) of treated water are evaporated each year.

Critics claim that the site was not the first choice because it was in the middle of nowhere, had no water supply, and because of the prevailing westerly winds, put the Phoenix-Metro area into jeopardy in the event of a major accident.

You guys are taking all the risks, and getting none of the benefits.

If your sewer system gets backed up, you're dead meat!!! :D

MBybee
December 20th, 2011, 05:14 PM
IMO, the crazy thing is, you guys are sitting next to the nation's largest nuclear power plant... and all that 'cheap' electricity is being sold to Cali (and Texas). LoL!
...
You guys are taking all the risks, and getting none of the benefits.
...
:D

I like to think of it as "energy farming" :)
It's better to export than import - I loved when Brewer commented that if CA really wanted nothing to do with AZ, they would happily shut off the flow of water and electricity that AZ currently sells them :)

:lolflag:

CharlesA
December 20th, 2011, 07:03 PM
Anyway, I *guess* we're talking about PCs here (personal computers), yes?!?!? Or not...

Aye. My server was up for 33 days before a kernel update. I see web server uptime/prod server uptime being skyhigh as a good thing.