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Abir
April 13th, 2006, 06:11 PM
hey guys im starting a ubuntu club at my university, i hope if u can provide mee with some pictures , posters any ideas, anything that might help. thank u in advance guys.:D

Derek Djons
April 13th, 2006, 06:27 PM
hey guys im starting a ubuntu club at my university, i hope if u can provide mee with some pictures , posters any ideas, anything that might help. thank u in advance guys.:D

I've been thinking about such ideas too. Here in Utrecht, The Netherlands where I live there's nothing to little going on. Currently I'm working on a website to post all kinds of news and guides on in Dutch.

What are you planning creating such a club. The first thing is to setup good and clear goals. Most clubs, just excisting and doing thinks don't last long or add much quality.

daynah
April 13th, 2006, 07:14 PM
I'm about to transfer to Berry College (berry.edu), a private school, and, well, they're not to tech savvy. I'm leaving a school where even in the non-online classes we take most of our tests online and turn in our assignments online and every class's syllabus is required to be on the same website... to a school that only has wireless in two buildings.

Oh, and they just mailed me a form to sign requiring me to use Windows XP, Microsoft Office, and Synaptic.

Yes, they can do that, it's a private school. And they are giving me Windows XP (I only had 2000) so it's not like I have to buy it, so I'm only mildly ticked. Try to think on the bright side. I can just dual boot, give windows, what, 10% partition, show the tech guy I have windows, and never look at it again.

I had been hoping for a while, though, to start a Linux Club on campus, and I wanted to know what you guys through about it. My old school, I'm already going to try to leave the legacy of one and hope it survives, but with my new school having made a pact with Microsoft, I dunno if I'll be able to start it.

A Linux Club that has a stock of cds for anyone to take, and club members will go to anyone's computer and "help" them install it (aka stand behind them and watch their gasping faces as their relise they can install it themselves) and be a physical source of help and, well, crankiness if anyone from the school tries to bully us for using Linux "in addition" to "using" microsoft.

I can hear me now, "Yes Mr. Tech Man, I've been using Windows, see? It's right there."

Anyway, most importantly, do you think it would be alright to start a Linux club on campus when the school has made a deal with microsoft? I don't want to start a club, affilerated or unaffilerated with the school, and then the school suddenly starts going "nuts" because we're helping people use microsoft less, which is why microsoft is paying them.

Also, if there's any other college or high school students here, have you thought of starting a linux club? Lots of clubs at colleges... don't do anything, and this is a club idea that actually would have activities to do and would look nice on resumes.

Please gimmie your thoughts on this! :)

(side note, at the very least I'll be ordering a stack of Ubuntu cds to give to the "Free Enterprise" club that's on campus ;) )

mscman
April 13th, 2006, 07:20 PM
If I were you, I would make sure to check with the administration before you go stepping on the University's feet. If it will get you in trouble because of deals with MS, it's probably not worth it. On the other hand, if you get the OK, I think it's a great idea. Luckily for me, Purdue University is very pro-Linux. Our Rosen Center for Advanced Computing runs many many Linux computers and clusters, and the lab that I work in uses dual-boot machines (XP and Debian.) As far as student organizations go, we have Purdue Linux User's Group (PLUG), which I am not yet a member of but looking into it.

Not sure if I was much help, but thought I would put my two cents in.

Stormy Eyes
April 13th, 2006, 07:21 PM
Anyway, most importantly, do you think it would be alright to start a Linux club on campus when the school has made a deal with microsoft? I don't want to start a club, affilerated or unaffilerated with the school, and then the school suddenly starts going "nuts" because we're helping people use microsoft less, which is why microsoft is paying them.

Don't ask us, ask the people running Berry College. I'll say this much, though I'm not a lawyer: if Berry College takes federal funding, then you can nail them on First Amendment grounds if they try to give you **** for starting a LUG (Linux User Group) on campus. You might want to get in contact with the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (http://www.thefire.org) and the American Civil Liberties Union (http://www.aclu.org) if you need legal help.

John.Michael.Kane
April 13th, 2006, 07:25 PM
Anythings worth a shot atleast once. the most the school could do is tell you to cease and desist. plus it depends on how many students join your free software movement that could be a make or break deal too. if you have many who approve the use of open formats you may be able to pull it off. in any event good luck, and explain the software as best you can,and make it as fun as you can for those you talk with about it.



Just my thoughts...

Efrain Valles
April 13th, 2006, 07:28 PM
well I was thinking about the same thing...
I wanna start a club and hand out some free CD's
maybe having a presentation at my local school ...
having posters printed shouldn't be too expensive...

get the artwork done and send them to a local print place (ask some graphic Designers around..)

it's good to know that we want to share this around...

daynah
April 13th, 2006, 07:39 PM
I finally got in contact with someone who knew what linux was ;) (another girl! yay!) and she said it was fine. The form that requires "Windows XP Pro" requires that if you use Windows you use XP Pro, it just says it... quite... baddly. She said there were about five people that she knows of who uses linux, but they all dual boot 'cause there's a few programs that some of the individual classes use that only work on Windows, but they'll give it to me for free.

So it sounds like I have an all clear. :)

I think a lot of people are afraid to try it out because they like getting a PERSON helping them, and hopefully having a club (even if we aren't as smart as you peeps on line) will help that feeling.

aysiu
April 13th, 2006, 08:12 PM
Most schools will require administrative approval before a club can be formed (you probably need to write up a proposal and have it signed by a few people). Once it's approved, it's approved. If it's rejected, it's rejected.

There's nothing to stop you and your friends from handing out Ubuntu CDs, though, even if you're not an official, school-sponsored club.

prizrak
April 13th, 2006, 08:26 PM
Well since everyone already gave you advice on how to start a club, Ima go for a different angle. Don't dual boot, it's a PITA you should install XP in something like VMware so that you can start it at will when you need it instead of rebooting.

aysiu
April 13th, 2006, 08:29 PM
Well since everyone already gave you advice on how to start a club, Ima go for a different angle. Don't dual boot, it's a PITA Dual-booting's a PITA? I think it's quite simple, actually, as long as you've backed up your data and you install Grub to the MBR.

ubuntu_demon
April 13th, 2006, 08:44 PM
I moved this thread to the cafe.

John.Michael.Kane
April 13th, 2006, 08:48 PM
@ubuntu_demon you may want to merge this thread with this one http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=159775

curuxz
April 13th, 2006, 10:12 PM
I would love to do the same at my uni (southampton solent), maybe there could be a ubuntu ULUG?

ubuntu_demon
April 13th, 2006, 10:24 PM
@ubuntu_demon you may want to merge this thread with this one http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=159775
thnx.
done :)

daynah
April 14th, 2006, 12:53 AM
Thanks for the move and the merge.

Yeah, if I'm going to be handing out cds to people who don't know a thing about linux, I'm going to be setting them up with a dual boot. No ifs ands or buts. :) Forcing people to use a program, especially when they may not be ready, definately isn't the way to get them to like it.

We did have a website that we had to use in my math class (oh yes, we had to draw parabolas on a computer) that really, actually was only IE compatable. I have a feeling that the website checked the browser and just refused to work if you didn't have and IE based browser, not that it couldn't work. Point is, apparently there are one or two classes like that at Berry. And... the windows is free. Each person will decide which they're use to what degree, but if they're just kinda curious and (hopefully) come up to the club for whatever reason, I'll start them off with a dualboot :)

This sounds like a DIY Marketing sorta thing.

prizrak
April 14th, 2006, 03:33 AM
Dual-booting's a PITA? I think it's quite simple, actually, as long as you've backed up your data and you install Grub to the MBR.
It's not difficult but it is a hassle. Say you go to a site that works only with IE or works better with Windows (every car manufacturer site I visited uses flash that doesn't work right with FF on Linux) you have to either remember to do it later or save your work, restart the system, choose the correct OS, wait for it to load, do w/e you needed to in Windows, rinse and repeat. Where is in VM you just start up the VM that boots you into Windows and you can go visit that site w/o interrupting your work. Starting newbies of on dual boot is a good idea but for a seasoned Linux user who doesn't need Windows for gaming just for some tasks like the ones OP described VM is a better solution.

aysiu
April 14th, 2006, 06:27 AM
It's not difficult but it is a hassle. Say you go to a site that works only with IE or works better with Windows (every car manufacturer site I visited uses flash that doesn't work right with FF on Linux) you have to either remember to do it later or save your work, restart the system, choose the correct OS, wait for it to load, do w/e you needed to in Windows, rinse and repeat. Where is in VM you just start up the VM that boots you into Windows and you can go visit that site w/o interrupting your work. Starting newbies of on dual boot is a good idea but for a seasoned Linux user who doesn't need Windows for gaming just for some tasks like the ones OP described VM is a better solution. Ah, I see! Not the setting up of the dual-boot--the actual use of it. Yes. I agree with that.

Efrain Valles
April 14th, 2006, 03:56 PM
That sounds serious... is Using Microsoft windows THAT mandatory???
wow I can't believe...

In my school they have something called Campus Agreement. and you can have Microsoft Software for real cheap prices... but they don't force us... Are you talking about the computer labs at your school???? wow...

I my school there is a Linux group... not very active and VERY ANTI DEBIAN... (I can't take it anymore The Devian vs KDE thing) so I have to make my club very guerrilla-like ;)

Abir
April 18th, 2006, 06:26 PM
guys i got the apporoval , and my Microprocessor Dr, is the faculty advisor, but i need posters and stuff can anyone provide me with them>>???

unbuntu
April 19th, 2006, 02:26 AM
guys i got the apporoval , and my Microprocessor Dr, is the faculty advisor, but i need posters and stuff can anyone provide me with them>>???

Raid the gallery on this site? http://www.ubuntuforums.org/gallery/

GreyFox503
April 19th, 2006, 06:28 AM
Starting a linux club should be fine, regardless of any agreement your University has with Microsoft.

My University licenses lots of Microsoft software for academic use, and our campus desktops run Windows XP (with the exception of a few lone Macs).

However, we do have servers on campus that run Red-Hat Linux. We also have a HUGE local mirror that serves up lots of free software (tons of linux distributions and FOSS, its great). Makes downloading easy. We even have Ubuntu!

Plus our ACM has a special sub-group dedicated to GNU/Linux and Unix.

So just because your University has an agreement with Microsoft doesn't mean you can't use anything you want.

Efrain Valles
April 19th, 2006, 02:39 PM
Starting a linux club should be fine, regardless of any agreement your University has with Microsoft.

My University licenses lots of Microsoft software for academic use, and our campus desktops run Windows XP (with the exception of a few lone Macs).

However, we do have servers on campus that run Red-Hat Linux. We also have a HUGE local mirror that serves up lots of free software (tons of linux distributions and FOSS, its great). Makes downloading easy. We even have Ubuntu!

Plus our ACM has a special sub-group dedicated to GNU/Linux and Unix.

So just because your University has an agreement with Microsoft doesn't mean you can't use anything you want.

Maybe I didn't explain well... when they have a big agreement... I mean we have Microsof Seminar every 4 months... The Dean of my school actually sold us to Microsoft... they give us free softeare for educational purposes. so by the time we graduate we become dependent of their software to do the job...
everything anti Microsoft would mean conflict of interest...

Anyway... BACK on topic....

I believe That we could all start Clubs... at our universities... don't you think... I am going for mine...

:)

Zodiac
April 19th, 2006, 02:44 PM
Moe is their leader.

http://cd.textfiles.com/carousel/GIFB/MOE.GIF

GreyFox503
April 20th, 2006, 01:36 AM
Maybe I didn't explain well... when they have a big agreement... I mean we have Microsof Seminar every 4 months... The Dean of my school actually sold us to Microsoft... they give us free softeare for educational purposes. so by the time we graduate we become dependent of their software to do the job...
everything anti Microsoft would mean conflict of interest...

Anyway... BACK on topic....

I believe That we could all start Clubs... at our universities... don't you think... I am going for mine...

:)
A Microsoft Seminar?? 0_o

Our University does have a deal with Microsoft that allows students to download "free" MS software. (I put free in quotes because, of course, the school has to pay MS for the license, and we are paying for it indirectly).

I'm much more worried about the last part about becoming dependent on their software because that's what you are learning on. Thankfully the CS department at my school isn't completely Microsoft brainwashed. The courses use a variety of Operating Systems, languages, and development environments.

I also noticed that you are from Venezuela. I live in the United States, and have never been to Venezuela. In fact, I'm not confident that I could even find it on a map. :)

So your situation may be very different from mine. Maybe your Universities have different policies (it does sound like that).

Then an Ubuntu (or just Linux) club would become much more rebellious! Sounds like fun.


It troubles me that entire generations of youth (including CS students) are being educated on entirely Microsoft software. MS's strategy is brilliant: that is a sure-fire way to ensure you will continue to produce faithful supporters in all educated fields.

There are some people at my school who consistently want to use Visual Studio for their projects, even when it would provide no benefit (making a simple web page!), and they think that C# is the best language ever.

Efrain Valles
April 20th, 2006, 04:58 PM
A Microsoft Seminar?? 0_o

Our University does have a deal with Microsoft that allows students to download "free" MS software. (I put free in quotes because, of course, the school has to pay MS for the license, and we are paying for it indirectly).

I'm much more worried about the last part about becoming dependent on their software because that's what you are learning on. Thankfully the CS department at my school isn't completely Microsoft brainwashed. The courses use a variety of Operating Systems, languages, and development environments.

I also noticed that you are from Venezuela. I live in the United States, and have never been to Venezuela. In fact, I'm not confident that I could even find it on a map. :)

So your situation may be very different from mine. Maybe your Universities have different policies (it does sound like that).

Then an Ubuntu (or just Linux) club would become much more rebellious! Sounds like fun.


It troubles me that entire generations of youth (including CS students) are being educated on entirely Microsoft software. MS's strategy is brilliant: that is a sure-fire way to ensure you will continue to produce faithful supporters in all educated fields.

There are some people at my school who consistently want to use Visual Studio for their projects, even when it would provide no benefit (making a simple web page!), and they think that C# is the best language ever.

well... the school thinks that just because the OS they have used is Microsoft. it has a name and bla bla... they think it is the best in the market... (they know very little don't you think???) so the get them to come and tell us how to do things... I am smarter than that and I am into JAVA. PHP and MYSQL... I dropped Visual Studio back in 1999 :)

Long live LINUX
VIVA LA UBUNTU...

Ps. Venezuela is not that Unknown...

http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/samerica/venewzz.gif

GreyFox503
April 21st, 2006, 06:04 AM
Thanks for the map of Venezuela. :)

I knew it had to be somewhere down there. At least I knew it was above Brazil.