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View Full Version : Why is nearly everything based off Unix V6, why not V7, 8, 9, or 10?



TheOnlyMrK
September 8th, 2010, 11:08 AM
Or even Plan 9?
...Yes I've been doing too much research. Lol. I can't help it Unix/Linux fascinates me, I just can't seem to find much info on why no one started using Unix V8, 9, and 10 as they came out, even V7 is hardly used by anything, V6 is what nearly everything sprouted off of.

( http://www.whitemoorstudio.com/site_media/images/unix_linux_timeline.jpg )

nrs
September 8th, 2010, 12:32 PM
The last has several inaccuracies. Anyways.

6 came before 7, and it was vaugely open sourceish, AFAIK. A bunch of projects sprouted up, and you generally only abandon something you've started when a new version comes out if you want to end up like HURD.

These new deritivies had things going for them (licensing, features, ...) so people continued to derive from them instead of the mainline.

Bits and pieces have been borrowed off the Unices you mentioned btw. /proc is straight out of Plan 9.

saulgoode
September 8th, 2010, 01:07 PM
Prior to the Copyright Act of 1976, copyright protection was not available unless the creator of a work included a copyright notice. Since it was widely regarded at that time that source code did not qualify for copyright protection (the theory being that software is purely functional), AT&T did not register Unix for copyright nor did they include copyright notices in the code.

The Copyright Act of 1976 made two critical changes that affected the status of the Unix code: no longer was it necessary to claim copyrights in order to receive copyright protection, and software was now explicitly included under the purview of copyright law.

Unix System 7 was released subsequent to the effective date of the Copyright Act of 1976.

t0p
September 8th, 2010, 01:18 PM
This might be a by-product of the big Unix/BSD copyright court action.

TheOnlyMrK
September 8th, 2010, 02:04 PM
Prior to the Copyright Act of 1976, copyright protection was not available unless the creator of a work included a copyright notice. Since it was widely regarded at that time that source code did not qualify for copyright protection (the theory being that software is purely functional), AT&T did not register Unix for copyright nor did they include copyright notices in the code.

The Copyright Act of 1976 made two critical changes that affected the status of the Unix code: no longer was it necessary to claim copyrights in order to receive copyright protection, and software was now explicitly included under the purview of copyright law.

Unix System 7 was released subsequent to the effective date of the Copyright Act of 1976.

Wow thanks for the info, that explains a lot. So basically V7 was only released to a few people, then V8, 9, and 10 was pretty much released to no one so it was never able to catch on?
Plus I'd imagine now days V6 is much more advanced from any of the others with how many have worked on and used it since then compaired to the others.