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sidewalkcynic
September 7th, 2010, 05:33 PM
I've been a Linux user for at almost three years now - exclusively. So what I am getting at is that I do not know Windows anymore, and I am wondering if Windows and Apple have applications as useful as what I find here in the Linux repositories? The applications I have been working the past three years were not available in the Windows format when I was in the Windows format.

Things as simple as Sticky notes, and Knotes would have been of tremendous benefit to me on Windows, and I would be very frustrated if I had to work in an office that the computers did not have a Knote-like application at the ready. I do not work in an office environment, and do not plan on it for the future, but I am wondering how the most popular OS survives without the selection of apps that Linux offers? Maybe, I am a little naive, because things like note takers are incorporated into browsers now, but how about the more complex note takers like Gjots, BasKets, and Kjots - good stuff, for sure, and I would lose my mind in frustration if not available on my work computer.

I almost forgot - research. How about applications for college students available with Windows compared to the note takers and bibliography apps available with Linux?

So, what's out there?

UKBB
September 7th, 2010, 05:55 PM
Windows 7 has sticky notes built in.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RiDaRM1HjM4

Mark Phelps
September 7th, 2010, 06:50 PM
... Things as simple as Sticky notes, and Knotes would have been of tremendous benefit to me on Windows, and I would be very frustrated if I had to work in an office that the computers did not have a Knote-like application at the ready.
As already mentioned, Win7 has this built-in, and there are a host of third-party sticky note apps available for MS Windows.


I am wondering how the most popular OS survives without the selection of apps that Linux offers?
I've been using MS Windows a LOT longer, and Linux (going back to the Unix days) a LONG time too, and I find the two universes very similar in terms of the varieties of apps offered.


Maybe, I am a little naive, because things like note takers are incorporated into browsers now, but how about the more complex note takers like Gjots, BasKets, and Kjots - good stuff, for sure, and I would lose my mind in frustration if not available on my work computer.
Have been using MS Office OneNote on a Tablet PC for several years -- and it completely blows away ANYTHING offered in the Linux world.

Plus, native with Tablet XP, then with Vista, and now with Win7, is the MS Journal app -- that not only captures hand-written notes real-time, but also allow for searching (of the handwritten text) and off-line conversion to text -- with customization, dictionary support, and custom lexicon support -- all built in. There is NOTHING in the Linux world that even comes CLOSE to its features.


I almost forgot - research. How about applications for college students available with Windows compared to the note takers and bibliography apps available with Linux?

I thought most "research" today was done using Google and Wikipedia. If you want to go "back" to encyclopedias, Britannica is still available -- as an MS Windows app. As already mentioned, MS Journal is a great handwriting note-taking app. There are a host of class schedule management, term paper management, and other such stuff available in the MS Windows world.

And the other big "plus" about the academic world is that many of these apps are available to real students and staff at a fraction of the retail prices -- and contain nearly all of the functionality of the costlier retail versions.

sidewalkcynic
September 7th, 2010, 09:05 PM
Have been using MS Office OneNote on a Tablet PC. . . .the MS Journal app -- that not only captures hand-written notes real-time, but also allow for searching (of the handwritten text) and off-line conversion to text -- with customization, dictionary support, and custom lexicon support -- all built in.
. . .As already mentioned, MS Journal is a great handwriting note-taking app. There are a host of class schedule management, term paper management, and other such stuff available in the MS Windows world.This sounds like the update I wanted to learn - thanks.

earthpigg
September 7th, 2010, 09:12 PM
It sounds to me like perhaps you've forgotten how Windows users typically find software.

Perhaps you have become used to the Free Software way of software selection, which is community-centric. Discussion forums like this one, and websites that encourage user input, are what many of us in this neck of the woods use to select software.

Recall the alternative way of doing things: "Everyone does what their local trusted computer nerd tells them to do."

For some, it's a family member. For others, its an employee of the local computer shop.

This may be useful to you: http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1832211/windows%20software.jpg

It's from 4chan's /g/, which is essentially my "local computer nerd" for my Win7 VirtualBox install that I am forced to use from time to time as a student. I can't be bothered to evaluate the options for myself or seek a variety of community opinions. I just suck it up and do what long-time current Windows users tell me to do, while keeping the BS filter turned on. The image I linked has Free Software and Proprietary Software marked as such.

andymorton
September 7th, 2010, 09:36 PM
I had Windows 7 on my netbook for a while and One Note was very useful, particularly for taking lecture notes.

andy:)

Dr. C
September 8th, 2010, 03:52 PM
It sounds to me like perhaps you've forgotten how Windows users typically find software.

Perhaps you have become used to the Free Software way of software selection, which is community-centric. Discussion forums like this one, and websites that encourage user input, are what many of us in this neck of the woods use to select software.

Recall the alternative way of doing things: "Everyone does what their local trusted computer nerd tells them to do."

For some, it's a family member. For others, its an employee of the local computer shop.

This may be useful to you: http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1832211/windows%20software.jpg

It's from 4chan's /g/, which is essentially my "local computer nerd" for my Win7 VirtualBox install that I am forced to use from time to time as a student. I can't be bothered to evaluate the options for myself or seek a variety of community opinions. I just suck it up and do what long-time current Windows users tell me to do, while keeping the BS filter turned on. The image I linked has Free Software and Proprietary Software marked as such.

How true. The Microsoft Windows 7 guide is excellent.