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Logan513
August 15th, 2010, 01:43 AM
So I heard from a couple of people that the UNIX operating system (Yes the one owned by AT&T) is a rare and endangered operating system. Well, my aunt works at a company that registers people in dog shows, and she's STILL working on 20 year old UNIX computers! Recently she decided it was time to upgrade so she hired a retired engineer from IBM to write them a new program for there company to work on Windows and be all pretty and crap. Anyway, she said I could have the old computers with UNIX since they were gonna' toss em' anyway. As long as I agreed to erase all there ORACLE data, and personal crap before I got my hands on it. From what I've heard from the documentary 'Revolution OS' is that GNU/Linux was inspired by and a lot like the AT&T UNIX operating system. So I guess I should be able to pick it up pretty easy.

So anyway, I wanted to know if there was a way I could copy the OS onto a CDROM. If UNIX was really as rare and historic as people tell me. And if I could copy the OS, would anyone here be interested?

Even if UNIX isn't that rare, I still won't care. Becuase I have a fondness for old computer screens, and keyboards! :D Just thought I'd tell you guys!

_Logan_

Logan513
August 15th, 2010, 03:18 AM
b u m p
u p y o
m s
p t

Sporkman
August 15th, 2010, 03:25 AM
S s o r y u t b c A p h w s
o y p e e p h e o s e e a y
s e g a g e m r a s s
I t r i r r m a p l s r t
e a s a l u o o d i e
h m t t o d a l t n n n m
e i e l e e g a f s .
a ( n r d n p r l r p
r Y g s s e r s a o i S
d e U o w e s c m r o
s s p N t w r e
f y e I s p t i I a t d I
r t s o X h r y t p h
o h t p e o h a e b g
m e e l c g a g b y u
m e o h r n U r e d e
a o . m i a d N e f o a s
n i p r m I e o c n s
c e W n u e c X d r u d
o e t d f r e m I
u o l d e o a s t e a
p w l o r a r p i o I n s
l n , g s . n t l h
e e ! r t c e g a o o
d m s e h A e r o r t u
o y h R t e n a t y l
f b o e i r y t s l d
y a w c r e w h e m ' i
p u s e e a e y R k b
e A n , n d c y y a e e e
o T t t o , l h v
p & a l e m w l a o t a
l T w n y n p s e n l h b
e ) o d g a h r t d u e l
r s i n e e h s t e
t i k s h n y e i A
h s s h e e s g r o o T t
a e e t a o e n n & o
t a a ' d r o i n T
t s e d n O i O p
t r c f w a R t S U i
h a a S i r o I ' A . ' N c
e r T d o r C I k
e c I e m k c t L F i X
U o L d o o E r s i
N a m L I o u s o o t
I n p i B n l s d m t p
X d a w t M d a h e u
n o W e t w a r p
o e y r w t i h m a h t a
p n k a o n a ' , a t p
e d t i s d v t G i r
r a h n w o e a a N n e
a n a g t r w n n I U g t
t g t i i s t y d ' / t
i e o m t h w v L y
n r n e e a e a e i
g e n y n e
d 2 t d o . u a
0 o l x s
d y
.

murderslastcrow
August 15th, 2010, 03:26 AM
That was tight. Um, Bell Labs actually has a more recent version of Unix they've been working on (or rather, not working on). I forget what it's called... oh right, Plan 9.

http://plan9.bell-labs.com/plan9/

So yeah, the original Unix from the 80s is pretty freakin' rare. I'd hold onto those boxes if I were you.

Logan513
August 15th, 2010, 03:36 AM
Lmao! Thats awesome...
Anyway.... I can't believe she was throwing those away!

Project 9? I'm interested now.... Thanks for sharing that.
Open source I see? Sweet.

murderslastcrow
August 15th, 2010, 03:39 AM
How much do you want for one? XD Does it work okay?

sandyd
August 15th, 2010, 03:42 AM
S s o r y u t b c A p h w s
o y p e e p h e o s e e a y
s e g a g e m r a s s
I t r i r r m a p l s r t
e a s a l u o o d i e
h m t t o d a l t n n n m
e i e l e e g a f s .
a ( n r d n p r l r p
r Y g s s e r s a o i S
d e U o w e s c m r o
s s p N t w r e
f y e I s p t i I a t d I
r t s o X h r y t p h
o h t p e o h a e b g
m e e l c g a g b y u
m e o h r n U r e d e
a o . m i a d N e f o a s
n i p r m I e o c n s
c e W n u e c X d r u d
o e t d f r e m I
u o l d e o a s t e a
p w l o r a r p i o I n s
l n , g s . n t l h
e e ! r t c e g a o o
d m s e h A e r o r t u
o y h R t e n a t y l
f b o e i r y t s l d
y a w c r e w h e m ' i
p u s e e a e y R k b
e A n , n d c y y a e e e
o T t t o , l h v
p & a l e m w l a o t a
l T w n y n p s e n l h b
e ) o d g a h r t d u e l
r s i n e e h s t e
t i k s h n y e i A
h s s h e e s g r o o T t
a e e t a o e n n & o
t a a ' d r o i n T
t s e d n O i O p
t r c f w a R t S U i
h a a S i r o I ' A . ' N c
e r T d o r C I k
e c I e m k c t L F i X
U o L d o o E r s i
N a m L I o u s o o t
I n p i B n l s d m t p
X d a w t M d a h e u
n o W e t w a r p
o e y r w t i h m a h t a
p n k a o n a ' , a t p
e d t i s d v t G i r
r a h n w o e a a N n e
a n a g t r w n n I U g t
t g t i i s t y d ' / t
i e o m t h w v L y
n r n e e a e a e i
g e n y n e
d 2 t d o . u a
0 o l x s
d y
.

reminds me of the matrix

Logan513
August 15th, 2010, 03:45 AM
How much do you want for one? XD Does it work okay?

Well... I can send you a copy of the OS if you want (and it's possible). But I don't know. It's sorta a server, where the different monitors and keyboards hook up to it. So really there is only one computer running UNIX.
And LMAO... it works great!

detroit/zero
August 15th, 2010, 03:56 AM
Well... I can send you a copy of the OS if you want (and it's possible). But I don't know. It's sorta a server, where the different monitors and keyboards hook up to it. So really there is only one computer running UNIX.
And LMAO... it works great!

Old and rare?

Isn't that "cloud computing"?

Logan513
August 15th, 2010, 03:56 AM
Old and rare?

Isn't that "cloud computing"?

Err? I can has explanation?

murderslastcrow
August 15th, 2010, 04:40 AM
Connecting to a server to work on a remote application is technically 'cloud computing,' basically the new name for web applications, of which server-based software is technically a category.

But yeah, haha, I guess I can't get the machine off of you since it's all connected, although I would be interested in finding some way to test the image of the hard drive when it's all cleaned up. Is it really that familiar? Is its shell nearly as versatile as bash? Oh goodness, why the Heck would this get me interested?

Probably because I like to see how useful something so old can really be. But yeah, we should see if you could host a REAL server on there somehow. XD

I was more curious about how well the hardware works- we all know UNIX is invincible. D:

jerenept
August 15th, 2010, 05:18 AM
Isn't BSD Unix?

Anyway, that's cool man! You might be, one of the few people who own one of those!

Logan513
August 15th, 2010, 05:53 AM
Connecting to a server to work on a remote application is technically 'cloud computing,' basically the new name for web applications, of which server-based software is technically a category.

But yeah, haha, I guess I can't get the machine off of you since it's all connected, although I would be interested in finding some way to test the image of the hard drive when it's all cleaned up. Is it really that familiar? Is its shell nearly as versatile as bash? Oh goodness, why the Heck would this get me interested?

Probably because I like to see how useful something so old can really be. But yeah, we should see if you could host a REAL server on there somehow. XD

I was more curious about how well the hardware works- we all know UNIX is invincible. D:

Well its all hooked up via Ethernet (I think...) But I'm not completely sure. I definitely know that its running on a tower... and that there is like one main central computer.... But that's about it. I don't know. I hope I can copy the OS over for ya!

earthpigg
August 15th, 2010, 06:03 AM
dd the entire hard drive before you touch it!

that data, as it was used, may have some real value soon.

Sef
August 15th, 2010, 06:09 AM
Isn't BSD Unix?

The BSDs are based on Unix 4.4 and is unix-like, but it is not UNIX as that is trademarked. Apple OSX 10.5, which is based on FreeBSD, is UNIX; the earlier ones are unix-like.

Logan513
August 15th, 2010, 07:03 AM
dd the entire hard drive before you touch it!

that data, as it was used, may have some real value soon.

I just really hope that I can back all this up before they try and erase it or something... these people don't know anything about computers...

neoargon
August 15th, 2010, 07:16 AM
What are the hardware specifications ?

neoargon
August 15th, 2010, 07:20 AM
The BSDs are based on Unix 4.4 and is unix-like, but it is not UNIX as that is trademarked. Apple OSX 10.5, which is based on FreeBSD, is UNIX; the earlier ones are unix-like.

As you said, freeBSD , is not unix . Then how would osx which is based on freeBSD become Unix ?

Noz3001
August 15th, 2010, 12:58 PM
As you said, freeBSD , is not unix . Then how would osx which is based on freeBSD become Unix ?

It's UNIX-Like but now has a unix 03 certification. Read (http://www.unix.org/unix03.html)

Spice Weasel
August 15th, 2010, 01:14 PM
You are one lucky guy! I have a fondness as well for old computers. :D

Any pictures?

mr-woof
August 15th, 2010, 02:27 PM
get some pictures up of the old girl :)

Logan513
August 15th, 2010, 02:35 PM
You are one lucky guy! I have a fondness as well for old computers. :D

Any pictures?

Well actually I haven't gotten my hands on it yet. The retired IBM guy is still working on the program. And then its a matter of him coming in and setting them up. And then copying the files from the UNIX machine to something else. All I know is it does have a 9GB hard drive. (actually I am not sure were I read that but sometime when I was at the place my aunt works at, I just remember going... 'OMGWTFBBQ?!?!?! 9GB!?!?!?!?!?!?' But I guess you need it for a business. Speaking of which... how the heck am I going to back this thing up without tearing out the hard drive. (probably going to look like the anal cavity of a 5,000,000,000 year old mummy)

When I do get my hands on it, I am planning to make a Youtube video on it. Because I have only seen one other UNIX machine on Youtube.

Fludizz
August 15th, 2010, 02:39 PM
...
(probably going to look like the anal cavity of a 5,000,000,000 year old mummy)
...
I don't want to know how you know what that looks like :P


Ontopic: Awesome :D Can't wait for you video of the old box :)
Any other plans with it? Or are you just going to store it as an artifact when you're done playing with it? :P

Logan513
August 15th, 2010, 02:44 PM
I don't want to know how you know what that looks like :P


Ontopic: Awesome :D Can't wait for you video of the old box :)
Any other plans with it? Or are you just going to store it as an artifact when you're done playing with it? :P

Nah, not really. I'm probably going to play with it, figure it out, then write some programs for it, then get bored with it, box it up carefully and put it in my closet. :lol:

Noz3001
August 15th, 2010, 03:07 PM
Turn it into a server and put ssh on it so everyone can have a play ;D

SoFl W
August 15th, 2010, 03:19 PM
she said I could have the old computers with UNIX since they were gonna' toss em' anyway. As long as I agreed to erase all there ORACLE data, and personal crap before I got my hands on it.
How are you going to erase it before you get your hands on it?


and she's STILL working on 20 year old UNIX computers!
In all seriousness, look up some info on the old machine. Many very old machines used gold in their connections and circuit boards. Even an ounce or two of the gold connectors could make a nice return on your investment.

EDIT: I re-read the thread, if it has a 9gig hard drive then it might not be as old as I originally thought.

sandyd
August 15th, 2010, 03:58 PM
How are you going to erase it before you get your hands on it?


In all seriousness, look up some info on the old machine. Many very old machines used gold in their connections and circuit boards. Even an ounce or two of the gold connectors could make a nice return on your investment.

EDIT: I re-read the thread, if it has a 9gig hard drive then it might not be as old as I originally thought.
nope. not old, really. I still have those with the 5mb HDs. (too lazy to dig it up, but its about 5mb)

SoFl W
August 15th, 2010, 04:20 PM
nope. not old, really. I still have those with the 5mb HDs. (too lazy to dig it up, but its about 5mb)

I remember when I thought 5mb was a lot of storage....

linux18
August 15th, 2010, 04:55 PM
nope. not old, really. I still have those with the 5mb HDs. (too lazy to dig it up, but its about 5mb)
ok, 20 years ago is 1990 so thats probably a 500MB hard drive, however it was probably upgraded with a 2.5 GB hard drive, and later a 6GB hard drive thus 9GB, but we wont know untill he gets his hands on it

anyway, the reason unix is so rare is because all the unix machines are still running :)
unix is like debian stable without kernel upgrades and hardware specifically made to run it.
I wouldn't be surprised if the uptime of that machine was 20 years excluding power outages.

Logan513
August 15th, 2010, 11:15 PM
How are you going to erase it before you get your hands on it?


In all seriousness, look up some info on the old machine. Many very old machines used gold in their connections and circuit boards. Even an ounce or two of the gold connectors could make a nice return on your investment.

EDIT: I re-read the thread, if it has a 9gig hard drive then it might not be as old as I originally thought.

I don't care about the gold... xD

And secondly I mean, before I take it home. I'm going to backup the hard drive, then start erasing the Oracle data while it's still at the company. And if something screws up then I restart. I won't be able to take it home until the data's gone.

murderslastcrow
August 16th, 2010, 02:38 AM
I'm totally looking these up on YouTube. If knowing what UNIX is seems old-fashioned today, just think what people will think reading this thread 100 years from now (assuming people even care 100 years from now).

I should go read USENET logs from the early 90s.

Totally unrelated Logan, but your signature is very similar to a wise man's words, "No sane person could live in this world and not be crazy."

mips
August 17th, 2010, 02:15 PM
What brand & model is the box?

Spice Weasel
August 17th, 2010, 02:40 PM
The reason we see so little of Unix is that it is mainly used in the mainframes of major corporations. It's pretty hard to get a licence, and from what I've heard costs a lot too.

Good luck sorting it out. :p

Fri13
August 18th, 2010, 09:38 AM
So you basicly only want a old Unix OS, while right now you are using the modern Unix OS called Linux (Linux kernel is the whole OS). You can even get a certificated Unix OS from Apple. Because Apple did certificate their XNU operating system and it is 100% open source operating system what Apple use to run Mac OS X and iOS.

Even the GNU's own HURD operating system is Unix clone. You can use FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD and Dragon Fly BSD if you want Unix.

Or go to torrent sites and grap a Solaris or OpenSolaris images and you get certificated SunOS operating system in them. Altough SunOS is propietary and disributed as binary but still.

The Unix has not died, it still lives but the old versions has been replaced by Linux in last 15 years. Even that Linux is very young OS, from 1991 to today, just 19 years old, it is getting over it teenage time.

Many do not respect operating systems what are Unix clones. Even that the Unix certificate is more than just something what you buy and test (it is very much the standards), the Unix clones are right now the future.

Linux is the second coming of Unix. When Linus Torvalds started the OS project, he was just used some of the Unix systems. He even wrote Linux to be a Unix clone without having the handbook with him, the Linux just born to be very close the Unix OS. And main reason for that is that Unix is about logic and technical ideas how Unix OS and whole software system should work.

And one feature what helped Linus was that he chosen the monolithic architecture for the OS so it was the same as Unixes were. Even that today many Unix clones and some Unix operating systems are Server-Client (Minix, HURD, kFreeBSD, Dragon Fly, XNU and so on) the monolithic architecture is the idealogical for operating systems (Linux, FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, SunOS, HP-UX).

But what there is to see with Unix? Nothing.
The more important software for the user is the user interface, not the OS under the interface. And Unix was designed so that you can easily run any wanted user interface top of it. Was it a Sh (or today a Bash) or something else, user had the freedom to choose the UI.

What I am interested is to hear what Unix there is. Just check what uname command say and it prints the OS name. (The GNU version of uname is incorrect and abuse the standard, but if it is old Unix, there is the version what follows the standard).

murderslastcrow
August 18th, 2010, 10:08 AM
Haha, I don't think many people here would dispute the role of UNIX-based/certified Operating Systems play today and will continue to play in the future. It's the fact that it's such an old, rare version of UNIX that it's interesting. Just like an antique- when someone has an old rifle from the civil war, it would be a bit odd to say, "why don't you just get a newer semi-automatic? They're all over the place, and they would work way better than that piece of crap. They're still guns that shoot bullets."

Lol, not that you had that attitude, but just trying to give you an idea of why this is so cool. I wonder if uname was part of UNIX before? That would be very interesting to see the version it uses.

Of course, we'll wait patiently until you get the box itself and have it all safely put together. Hopefully they didn't upgrade it to the point that they ended up putting Linux on it, too. XD

mips
August 18th, 2010, 11:54 AM
So you basicly only want a old Unix OS, while right now you are using the modern Unix OS called Linux (Linux kernel is the whole OS). You can even get a certificated Unix OS from Apple. Because Apple did certificate their XNU operating system and it is 100% open source operating system what Apple use to run Mac OS X and iOS.


Solaris is also more modern and a certified Unix which can be had for free.

Spice Weasel
August 18th, 2010, 01:26 PM
You're forgetting that this is AT&T Unix, the original *nix OS. There was nothing like this before.

Like murderslastcrow said,


It's the fact that it's such an old, rare version of UNIX that it's interesting. Just like an antique- when someone has an old rifle from the civil war, it would be a bit odd to say, "why don't you just get a newer semi-automatic? They're all over the place, and they would work way better than that piece of crap. They're still guns that shoot bullets."

mips
August 18th, 2010, 03:58 PM
You're forgetting that this is AT&T Unix, the original *nix OS. There was nothing like this before.


Well if it's 20yrs old it could be SVR4. If it's older it could be SVR3 and if it's from IBM it's most like AIX.

Spice Weasel
August 18th, 2010, 06:40 PM
Well if it's 20yrs old it could be SVR4. If it's older it could be SVR3 and if it's from IBM it's most like AIX.

AT&T Unix - 1969


Unix (officially trademarked as UNIX, sometimes also written as Unix with small caps) is a computer operating system originally developed in 1969 by a group of AT&T employees at Bell Labs

SVR (Are you talking about System V?) - 1983


Unix System V, commonly abbreviated SysV (and usually pronounced though rarely written as "System Five"), is one of the first commercial versions of the Unix operating system. It was originally developed by American Telephone & Telegraph (AT&T) and first released in 1983.

IBM AIX - 1986


The AIX family of operating systems debuted in 1986, became the standard operating system for the RS/6000 series on its launch in 1990, and is still actively developed by IBM.


It could have been any of the versions you mentioned.

linux18
August 18th, 2010, 10:12 PM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d9/Unix_history-simple.en.svg/800px-Unix_history-simple.en.svg.png


wikipedia always wins when it comes to SVG charts

I say System V R4 is on the computer that this thread is about