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cableman
August 2nd, 2010, 05:38 PM
how many bit recommended daily for most desktop users?

chrisinspace
August 2nd, 2010, 05:39 PM
how many bit recommended daily for most desktop users?

It depends on your processor/RAM. If your process supports 64 bit and you have more than 3 GB of RAM, I'd say go with 64 bit.

cableman
August 2nd, 2010, 07:05 PM
i will use it for school work and class homework and home business?

snowpine
August 2nd, 2010, 07:09 PM
32 bit is the safe choice, as it will run on either 32 bit or 64 bit computers.

If you know you have a 64 bit processor with 3gb+ of ram then you might consider 64 bit.

MasterGamerJK
August 2nd, 2010, 07:12 PM
the best way to easily tell if to base it on your amount of RAM:


<4 32-bit
=4 64-bit
>4 64-bit


ie- 3GB is MAX supported for 32-bit OS, yes you can make it work with more, but you will NEVER have the same performance as you would with a 64-bit system

chrisinspace
August 2nd, 2010, 07:30 PM
32 bit is the safe choice, as it will run on either 32 bit or 64 bit computers.

If you know you have a 64 bit processor with 3gb+ of ram then you might consider 64 bit.

32 bit is a safe bet for compatibility, but if you bought a system with more than 3 GB of RAM and you go with a 32 bit OS then you've just wasted a gig of RAM (and your money). The main exception I could see is if you rely heavily on Flash. Adobe canceled the 64 bit native version (http://labs.adobe.com/technologies/flashplayer10/64bit.html) a couple of months ago. You can get the 32 bit version to work, but sometimes the process can be a little tricky.

mcduck
August 2nd, 2010, 07:43 PM
the best way to easily tell if to base it on your amount of RAM:


<4 32-bit
=4 64-bit
>4 64-bit


ie- 3GB is MAX supported for 32-bit OS, yes you can make it work with more, but you will NEVER have the same performance as you would with a 64-bit system

Not really. 64-bit computing has a lot more to offer than the ability to address more memory.

Depending on what you do, 64-bit computing can actually give a great performance boost. It's just a question of what kind of tasks you actually do with the computer. (for any media-related tasks like audio/video encoding and rendering, and of course scientific calculations, 64-bit computing is a lot better than 32 bits. Assuming that the program(s) you are using are coded in a way that allows them to use it, of course.)


I'd say that the easy rule is this:

If you have less than 4GB RAM and you don't know what 64-bit computing does, or if the programs & hardware you use supports it, then stick with 32-bit version. You probably aren't doing much of the kind of work that would benefit from 64-bit OS and would never notice any benefits, only the possible problems.

In every other case go for 64-bit OS.