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View Full Version : Who uses 256 workspaces?!



Legendary_Bibo
July 8th, 2010, 03:01 AM
I just messed with the workspaces thing to see how it affected my compiz sphere and I just realized you could have a max of 256 workspaces. Who the hell uses so many?

dragos240
July 8th, 2010, 03:11 AM
For the lulz? If you want that many, you can have that many.

blithen
July 8th, 2010, 03:18 AM
You could put a picture on each one and have a fancy compiz effect switch to them, kind of like a slideshow. And as dragos said, if you want that many you have that many.

JK3mp
July 8th, 2010, 03:21 AM
I bet aliens use that many... =P

Dustin2128
July 8th, 2010, 03:24 AM
I bet aliens use that many... =P
Indeed, I do.

steveneddy
July 8th, 2010, 03:38 AM
I bet aliens use that many... =P

No we don't.

Lucradia
July 8th, 2010, 03:40 AM
255 is the end of two digit hex, so I believe 256 may have been chosen because the code doesn't know how to re-repeat after 256.

Or maybe start of 16-bit?

earthpigg
July 8th, 2010, 03:51 AM
256 is a pretty commonly encountered number in computers.

2^8, to be specific. 2^10 is 1kb, 2^20 is 1mb, and so on.

the limit probably just happened to work out there because that number coincedentally relied upon some other number that was 2^8, and the developers saw no reason to place an artificial limit.

"if it takes us zero work for the limit to be 256, why do additional work to decrease that limit and potentially introduce new bugs?"

The Real Dave
July 8th, 2010, 02:26 PM
Orginally, each workspace used another 1MB of RAM. The creator when testing had but 257MB of free RAM and swap, and therefore, set it to 256 for stability reasons.

Phrea
July 8th, 2010, 02:49 PM
Orginally, each workspace used another 1MB of RAM. The creator when testing had but 257MB of free RAM and swap, and therefore, set it to 256 for stability reasons.

:lolflag:

chriswyatt
July 8th, 2010, 03:36 PM
I bet Linus uses 256 workspaces simultaneously.

whiskeylover
July 8th, 2010, 03:42 PM
Chuck Norris uses 257

MaxIBoy
July 8th, 2010, 09:43 PM
Old-time hacker Joseph M. Newcomer advises that whenever choosing a quantifiable but arbitrary restriction, you should make it either a power of 2 or a power of 2 minus 1. If you impose a limit of 107 items in a list, everyone will know it is a random number on the other hand, a limit of 15 or 16 suggests some deep reason (involving 0- or 1-based indexing in binary) and you will get less flamage (http://www.catb.org/%7Eesr/jargon/html/F/flamage.html) for it. Limits which are round numbers in base 10 are always especially suspect.
Source: http://www.catb.org/~esr/jargon/html/R/restriction.html