PDA

View Full Version : How to start a technical session in a conference?



legolas_w
July 3rd, 2010, 03:23 PM
Hello everyone.

I will be speaking in a Java conference in a couple of months.
My session starts at 11. I am wondering how I should start the session.

Is this ok:


Hello everyone, good morning
My name is X Y and I am here to introduce to the Clojure in Java. Hope you enjoy the session.

or you have other suggestions for the start?

Thanks.

fatality_uk
July 3rd, 2010, 05:34 PM
Really depends on the audience, but for a technical conference, that sounds to me like the best way to start.

legolas_w
July 5th, 2010, 10:50 PM
Thanks. it makes me feel at ease to see my start is a good one.

fatality_uk
July 5th, 2010, 11:08 PM
One thing I would say is try and avoid all the "tricks" that people might suggest, jokes, shocks etc.

Be clear, concise and focused. Know your subject. As well as having your "script" in front of you, also have a bullet point list of the headings for each section with the starting line for each written underneath e.g.


Java, the future for online development.
I know that many of you will be developing online apps with Java so I now want to talk about how...

Helps you keep on track

standingwave
July 6th, 2010, 03:19 AM
or you have other suggestions for the start?

Get sloppy drunk beforehand.. Always begin with an off-color, potentially offensive joke. If you make it political, you can torque off half your audience right from the start. :p

No, your intro is fine. Keep it simple and professional.

legolas_w
July 11th, 2010, 02:45 PM
Get sloppy drunk beforehand.. Always begin with an off-color, potentially offensive joke. If you make it political, you can torque off half your audience right from the start. :p

No, your intro is fine. Keep it simple and professional.

:lol :D

legolas_w
July 11th, 2010, 02:46 PM
One thing I would say is try and avoid all the "tricks" that people might suggest, jokes, shocks etc.

Be clear, concise and focused. Know your subject. As well as having your "script" in front of you, also have a bullet point list of the headings for each section with the starting line for each written underneath e.g.



Helps you keep on track

Thank you very much, your comment are very helpful. I have not tought about having a script in front of me. Now I am determined to have one printed in addition to using the dual screen thingy of the openoffice impression.

diablo75
July 12th, 2010, 07:48 AM
I used to give oral presentations on a weekly basis to new hires at a factory, all about safety. I've also had to give a few technical power point presentations in school... I did one about the niche market of "Carputers" and the other was about how awesome Windows Vista made Linux look by comparison back in 2007.

Anyway, tips I would suggest:

- DO NOT write a script that requires you to stare at and read it. Your primary goal is to maximize eye contact and it's easiest to do that if you know the material behind your presentation like the palm of your hand. While you're at it, try to use your eye contact to convey your own enthusiasm for the subject material; let them know you know and enjoy what you are talking about.

- If you are putting a slide show together in Open Office or Powerpoint, DO NOT fill any slide with 12 point font text that you can barely read yourself and would bore the hell out of your audience. Stick with short bullet point statements that you can read in two seconds and type them in large, SANS SERIF fonts (they're easier to read from across a large room).

- Steal from the pros: Say what you want about Steve Jobs, the man knows how to give an effective keynote with the bare minimum on screen. Watch one of his presentations and take note of what you like about it and try to apply similar techniques on your own presentation. He never reads anything from the screen because he doesn't cram paragraphs of text into his slides; large white text on a gradient gray backdrop. He never uses cheesy animation effects or transitions; usually a simple fade is all it takes to look classy.

- Test your presentation out on the machine you'll be using to render it before you actually give your presentation.

Here's a link (http://davestechsupport.com/school/vistareport.zip) to the slide show for an oral presentation I did for a computer class a few years ago. We were asked to make a presentation based upon whatever our own personal favorite technical article was for that year. Mine was about the FAA and DOT taking a hard look at Linux as a possible alternative to upgrading to Windows Vista. It's not perfect, but it's easy on the eyes and might help convey the "less is more" concept.