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TheNerdAL
June 19th, 2010, 07:41 AM
So i am a noob at computer parts and I saw a video about it but I forgot.

Will this motherboard: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128394

And this CPU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103821

Work good?

I also don't know my motherboard size, how do I found that out?

And is it easy to rewire all the lights and stuff to the motherboard? Thanks.

McRat
June 19th, 2010, 07:52 AM
So i am a noob at computer parts and I saw a video about it but I forgot.

Will this motherboard: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128394

And this CPU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103821

Work good?

I also don't know my motherboard size, how do I found that out?

And is it easy to rewire all the lights and stuff to the motherboard? Thanks.

That's the exact motherboard I'm running right now. Yes, it will support that CPU, HOWEVER, the OEM CPU usually has no fan with it. My CPU is not as fast as that one, but this machine still hauls pretty good.

The instructions are very good with the Gigabyte MoBo, best I've seen lately.

It's a MicroATX form factor, so it will fit both ATX and MicroATX cases. It comes with 5.1 Surround Sound built in and nVidea? HDMI graphics (along with VGA&DVI).

It's a good choice. When you install Ubuntu DO NOT select the proprietary vid driver. The one that comes stock works better.

TheNerdAL
June 19th, 2010, 07:58 AM
Eh, I found out that one was too small so I found another Motherboard: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128376

And CPU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103471

McRat
June 19th, 2010, 08:03 AM
I was just going to suggest an X4 Retail, since they come with a fan and heatsink and the OEM doesn't.

But I put the MicroATX in a ATX case with no problem. There usually are multiple holes in cases for the different board sizes.

McRat
June 19th, 2010, 08:05 AM
WHOA!

That CPU (X4, X3) are AM3 mount. That second Mobo is AM2 mount. I don't think that CPU is going to work.

TheNerdAL
June 19th, 2010, 08:07 AM
WHOA!

That CPU (X4, X3) are AM3 mount. That second Mobo is AM2 mount. I don't think that CPU is going to work.

The CPU Is AM2+.

McRat
June 19th, 2010, 08:12 AM
The CPU Is AM2+.

DOH!! I thought it was http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103808

I thought that whole family was AM3. My bad.

TheNerdAL
June 19th, 2010, 08:14 AM
DOH!! I thought it was http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103808

I thought that whole family was AM3. My bad.

Is it a good combo? And What's better AMD or Intel?

McRat
June 19th, 2010, 08:30 AM
Is it a good combo? And What's better AMD or Intel?

I have had no compatibility issues with Ubuntu 10.04 and the Gigabyte MA785 mobo. Sound and video work great.

I bought about the cheapest possible combo at the time.

Dollar for dollar, the AMD normally runs faster. I've never really had significant trouble with either of them. Never had a CPU fail in my life, and that's a lot of them. But I don't overclock either.

Depending on how long you want to keep this computer, there are two things you should consider. A board that doesn't support AM3 won't have as many upgrade choices as time goes on. And if you can find a board that supports USB3.0 that fits your budget, I'd try to get one of those. It will be a popular item with accessories in the future.

NCLI
June 19th, 2010, 08:30 AM
Is it a good combo? And What's better AMD or Intel?

AMD = More bang for the buck
Intel = The most powerful and expensive

If you want a future-proof AM3 MB, I suggest the AsRock 890FX Deluxe3 (http://www.asrock.com/mb/overview.asp?Model=890FX%20Deluxe3).

TheNerdAL
June 19th, 2010, 08:31 AM
Okay, only problem is will it be easy to reconnect everything from the old motherboard to the new one?

McRat
June 19th, 2010, 08:46 AM
Okay, only problem is will it be easy to reconnect everything from the old motherboard to the new one?

Depends on what kind of case and power supply you have. If it's really old stuff, you'll probably have to dink with it more.

I just started with a new case: http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=1901962&Sku=TC3J-4050%20P

TheNerdAL
June 19th, 2010, 08:48 AM
Depends on what kind of case and power supply you have. If it's really old stuff, you'll probably have to dink with it more.

I just started with a new case: http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=1901962&Sku=TC3J-4050%20P

Let's just say my computer is 5-6 years old with a 1.8 Ghz single core processor, if I get that case would it be easier to reconnect the wires?

McRat
June 19th, 2010, 09:09 AM
Let's just say my computer is 5-6 years old with a 1.8 Ghz single core processor, if I get that case would it be easier to reconnect the wires?

Unless you are in a big tear, I'd first see if you could use the old. Waste not, want not.

Yes, that case works fine with the MA785, and it looks Macho. :D See if NewEgg has it.

If you've never built a clone before, you'll have an adventure, and perhaps even invent some new cusswords. But you'll get through it fine.

TheNerdAL
June 19th, 2010, 10:03 AM
Unless you are in a big tear, I'd first see if you could use the old. Waste not, want not.

Yes, that case works fine with the MA785, and it looks Macho. :D See if NewEgg has it.

If you've never built a clone before, you'll have an adventure, and perhaps even invent some new cusswords. But you'll get through it fine.

Thanks.

tadcan
June 19th, 2010, 10:17 AM
There are plenty of guides on building hardware on the net.

The important are these.

Get an anti-static wrist band or touch your hand on something metal every minute to discharge any static electricity your body may have.

Put the cpu/heatsink and ram in the board first. Then place in the case over the mounting screws. If you put the mother board in first then those items, you run the risk of cracking the motherboard.

Then it is just a matter of correctly identifying where the cables go.

cascade9
June 19th, 2010, 10:31 AM
@ tadcan- good advice.

@ McRat- 'clones'? Showing your age there, I havent heard of x86 systems beign reffered to as clones since the early 90s, and it was mainly an 80s term (for anyone who doesnt know, 'clones' came from 'cloned IMB AT', meaning a system that worked to the AT spec but wasnt built by IBM)


I was just going to suggest an X4 Retail, since they come with a fan and heatsink and the OEM doesn't.

But I put the MicroATX in a ATX case with no problem. There usually are multiple holes in cases for the different board sizes.

Yeah, unless you want to go paying extra for an aftermarket fan/heatsink, 'retail' CPUs are a better bet.

Putting a microATX motherboard into a full ATX case is usually no problems (but see below).


Let's just say my computer is 5-6 years old with a 1.8 Ghz single core processor, if I get that case would it be easier to reconnect the wires?

Depends. If its a standard, non-corporate ATX case then in almost all cases you will be fine. But the corporate (eg dell, compaq, hp, etc) cases have been known to use non-standard switch connectors, motherboard hole mounting patterns. Dell is the worst for this, but everybody has done it at some stage.

BTW, you are liekly to run into a diferent issue with putting a new system into a box that old- crappy, old power supply. Single core semps probabyl caem with 250-350watts power suplys, and while that might work, its not recommended. Being an old, and probabyl cheap power supply, its probably not puttign out what the sticker on the side says anyway, the caps would eb showing their age.....


WHOA!

That CPU (X4, X3) are AM3 mount. That second Mobo is AM2 mount. I don't think that CPU is going to work.

In almost all cases, AM2+ motherboards will take a AM3 CPU just fine. (BTW, that motherboard liked was a proper AM2+ motherboard, sometimes newegg are idiots like that) Less likely for AM2 motherbaords to support AM3 CPUs, but a huge number of them do.

You cant run an AM2/AM2+ in an AM3 socklet though (no DDR3 controller in the AM2/AM2+ CPUs, and AM3 should be using DDR3).


AMD = More bang for the buck
Intel = The most powerful and expensive

If you want a future-proof AM3 MB, I suggest the AsRock 890FX Deluxe3 (http://www.asrock.com/mb/overview.asp?Model=890FX%20Deluxe3).

Agreed, sort of, but you need to be looking at Intel CPUs that cost more than the top of the line AMD desktop CPUs to have an all-around advantage over AMD.

LOL @ future proof, but I know what you are gettign at. The 890FX chipsets may well have some future CPU support that other 8XX chipsets wont, but is it really worth paying twice the amount for a motherbaord 'just in case'?

I'd go for a 870 myself, since the main cost increase on the 890FX is for the extra PCIe lanes, letting you run triple crossfire. If the buyer has no intention of ever running crossfire (the vast majority of us) then a 890FX is wasted.


Depending on how long you want to keep this computer, there are two things you should consider. A board that doesn't support AM3 won't have as many upgrade choices as time goes on. And if you can find a board that supports USB3.0 that fits your budget, I'd try to get one of those. It will be a popular item with accessories in the future.

USB 3.0 and SATAIII (from a SB850 southbridge, not some poxy raid chip) is what I would be looking for. Go for AM3 CPU and motehrbaord, and a 8XX chipset with a SB850 southbridge.

If you want a motherboard without video (which is what I perfer) this is my choice-

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128443

With video, then this-

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128445

Watch out if you go looking to save a few dollars on getting a different 8XX motherboard. A lot of teh ones with onbaord video are still using the SB7XX southbridge,a dn that will only do SATAII. While SATAII vs SATAIII doesnt matter that much now, there are already SSDs that will saturate the bandwidth for SATAII and they will only get cheaper, and more common, over time.

TheNerdAL
June 19th, 2010, 10:32 AM
Then it is just a matter of correctly identifying where the cables go.

That is the only problem I have. :lolflag:

cascade9
June 19th, 2010, 10:41 AM
Thats pretty easy really, provided that you've got a standard ATX case. In almost every case I've ever worked on, there is little prined words on the conenctors (eg- 'power switch') and you just read the manual to figure out which pins the power switch conencts to.

In the very few cases that didnt have printing on the connectors, I just have to check where the wires went to. If the wires lead to the power LED, then its got to be the power LED. :lolflag:

TheNerdAL
June 19th, 2010, 11:35 AM
Thats pretty easy really, provided that you've got a standard ATX case. In almost every case I've ever worked on, there is little prined words on the conenctors (eg- 'power switch') and you just read the manual to figure out which pins the power switch conencts to.

In the very few cases that didnt have printing on the connectors, I just have to check where the wires went to. If the wires lead to the power LED, then its got to be the power LED. :lolflag:

Thanks Man! What's a good power supply for this CPU? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103471

I have an ATX Mobo, I think.

cascade9
June 19th, 2010, 11:42 AM
Thanks Man! What's a good power supply for this CPU? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103471

I have an ATX Mobo, I think.

What is your budget? What model computer do you have?

BTW, that is an AM2+ CPU, it wont work in AM3 boards.

CharlesA
June 19th, 2010, 11:49 AM
Almost everything is ATX nowadays (with the exception of super tiny formfactor ITX).

Depending on what else you will have in the box, anything from 450W to 600W would work, I prefer Corsair or Seasonic PSUs, but I've used Antec and OCZ ones too. I've got one of these (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139004), in a Dual core machine now, but it should run fine with a quad core.

Also: Don't cheap out/skimp on the PSU, it's one of the most important pieces of any computer.

tadcan
June 19th, 2010, 12:01 PM
That is the only problem I have. :lolflag:

As cascade9 said its easy. Most cables have a unique head so they only fit into one or two places and they are notched so they only go in one way.

For the sata cables put the harddrive cable in the sata1 slot as its the 'master slot', the DVD drive in sata2

The ones that can be similar are the cables from the power/reset front/HDD light from the front of the case.

The white slots are power slots and they should all have a cable in them. When you are finished tie up the cable neatly with cable ties. This will help access later on and improve airflow, which is important for cooling.

If you are reusing a heatsink you will need to get thermal paste for the connection to the cpu. If you are using a new heatsink ignore this.

Oh and the CPU will slot in by itself once line up correctly.

That is basically it. Good luck

TheNerdAL
June 19th, 2010, 12:22 PM
What is your budget? What model computer do you have?

BTW, that is an AM2+ CPU, it wont work in AM3 boards.

I don't know the exact model but it looks like this: http://www.woot.com/Images/Sale/Compaq_Presario_Media_Center_Desktop_PC_LTO-detail.jpg

And if you look at my other post you'll see I want another motherboard.

cascade9
June 19th, 2010, 12:36 PM
Almost everything is ATX nowadays (with the exception of super tiny formfactor ITX).

Depending on what else you will have in the box, anything from 450W to 600W would work, I prefer Corsair or Seasonic PSUs, but I've used Antec and OCZ ones too. I've got one of these (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139004), in a Dual core machine now, but it should run fine with a quad core.

Also: Don't cheap out/skimp on the PSU, it's one of the most important pieces of any computer.

A huge +1.


I don't know the exact model but it looks like this: http://www.woot.com/Images/Sale/Compaq_Presario_Media_Center_Desktop_PC_LTO-detail.jpg

Whcih really doesnt help much......


And if you look at my other post you'll see I want another motherboard.

The one on post #3?

You are much better off with the 870 over the 770. SATAIII + USB 3.0 + DDR3, not SATAII + USB 2.0 + DDR2.

If your money is a bit tight, drop the CPU slightly. Or even get a 'budget' CPU and plan on getting a nicer CPU later (AM3 isnt going anywhere soon) Its worth it in the long run.

Swagman
June 19th, 2010, 12:37 PM
5 - 6 years old.....

You may well find your RAM wont fit the slots on the new Mobo.

New builds usually comprise of..

1: Mobo
2: CPU & HSF (Which usually come in the same box)
3: RAM

You can usually attach most of your older stuff on it but be aware that NEW mobo's have newer power connections which .. although you can usually fettle a way around the issue.. Means a new PSU

cascade9
June 19th, 2010, 12:39 PM
5 - 6 years old.....

You may well find your RAM wont fit the slots on the new Mobo.

IIRC, TheNerdAl is using DDR1, and there is no way DDR1 is going to work in any of the current motherboards (all DDR2/DDR3)

TheNerdAL
June 19th, 2010, 12:41 PM
IIRC, TheNerdAl is using DDR1, and there is no way DDR1 is going to work in any of the current motherboards (all DDR2/DDR3)

OH SHIZ!! :( You are right, I'm gonna have to get some new ram then. :/ But okay, I guess.

Is this the one you want me to get? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128443

Swagman
June 19th, 2010, 12:46 PM
RAM....

When you decide which mobo you are going to buy then go to that manufacturers website and check its RAM compatibility list.

I DIDN'T do this with my new build and I now get random screen closures ????

To be fair I've never had this issue before so... I live & Learn !!

ie: 100 on 4gb RAM wasted (DDR3)

TheNerdAL
June 19th, 2010, 12:51 PM
RAM....

When you decide which mobo you are going to buy then go to that manufacturers website and check its RAM compatibility list.

I DIDN'T do this with my new build and I now get random screen closures ????

To be fair I've never had this issue before so... I live & Learn !!

ie: 100 on 4gb RAM wasted (DDR3)

I'm getting the one above your post.

TheNerdAL
June 19th, 2010, 01:04 PM
So I got a new Motherboard and CPU again and ram.

Motherboard: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128443

CPU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103674

RAM: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820148194

I'm just gonna start with 2 GB and add more if needed.

Swagman
June 19th, 2010, 01:30 PM
Memory Support List (http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=3423&dl=1#memory%20support%20list)

Check this list to see if your RAM is compatible

Yup.. Your RAM is on the list

http://www.upload3r.com/serve/190610/1276950896.jpeg

cascade9
June 19th, 2010, 01:35 PM
OH SHIZ!! :( You are right, I'm gonna have to get some new ram then. :/ But okay, I guess.

Is this the one you want me to get? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128443

Well, that is what I would get. I'm finding gigabyte is making some very god motehrobards now, and the 870 is the 8XX seires chipset I woudl get (890FX = too expensive, 880 and 890GX = onboard video I dislike, so that leaves the 870).

But its up to you which chipset, board, and manufactuer you get ;)


RAM....

When you decide which mobo you are going to buy then go to that manufacturers website and check its RAM compatibility list.

I DIDN'T do this with my new build and I now get random screen closures ????

To be fair I've never had this issue before so... I live & Learn !!

ie: 100 on 4gb RAM wasted (DDR3)

Its never a bad idea to check the RAM compatibility list, but those things can break your brain. You start lookign at the model numbers, eg GU34GB1600C7DC and then when you find GU34GB1333C6DCit looks close enough, but is it right? Arhhh!

In the end there are so many RAM manufacturers and different RAM sticks by every manufacturer that its impossible for the motherboard manufacturers to test every one.

Most of the time, there are no issues, its pretty rare for somethign that supports a memory standard to not work with memory of that standard. There can be issues. But unless some kind person has already figured it out for you, and posted it on the internet, and you can find that info, the only way to know for sure that its a RAM incompatibility probably is to test with different sticks. :|

CharlesA
June 19th, 2010, 02:39 PM
I had some RAM that was on the "suggested" list on newegg, end up causing my machine to bluescreen / kernel panic when coping files. It was gskill RAM DDR2 1066, granted it wasn't on the manufacture's spec list, but I ended up returning it and getting a Corsair DDR2 800 kit that has worked fine for over a year now.

If you need to get a total new machine, you might take a look at the DIY kits on newegg, some are pretty nice for the price. :)

Check out the one here: http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboBundleDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.416539

That one doesn't have a hard drive or cd drive unfortunately.

Frogs Hair
June 19th, 2010, 03:29 PM
What power supply do you have ? That is something to consider if plan to upgrade your graphics card at some point and also will the current psu support the mobo & cpu.

Brent0
June 19th, 2010, 05:14 PM
My new build is in my signature. I am very pleased with the hardware I chose.

Some suggestions:
-If you are going to be playing games, an Athlon II X3 440 is all you will need.
-Instead of buying 2x 1GB RAM, buy 1x 2GB RAM. (Sorry if that is confusing)
-Buy a new powersupply. Corsair is one of the best PSU brands.
-Buy a new case. I would NOT put my new hardware in that Compaq case.
-Gigabyte is not the only good Motherboard manufacturer. Check out Asus and the motherboard I chose.
-Without the HD5770, the build was only $500 and there were also rebates.

Can you also post your budget?

McRat
June 19th, 2010, 05:36 PM
If it's dual-channel mobo (it will say on the spec), buy your memory in matching pairs of dual-channel. I guess it's like RAID0 for your memory. Most stuff is dual channel now.

TheNerdAL
June 19th, 2010, 11:39 PM
I also have another question. Is it cheaper to build a computer or upgrade some parts, like I am doing for my 5-6 year old computer or is it cheaper to just buy a computer? :P

I might also be moving my old motherboard and CPU to my neighbors computer with the RAM and Power Supply. :P It should be faster for them since their computer is 10 years old. :P

Frogs Hair
June 20th, 2010, 01:15 AM
Search bare-bones kits at New egg , Tiger direct , and Comp USA , just to name a few.

CharlesA
June 20th, 2010, 03:01 AM
It would be cheaper to buy a new one, check out the kit I linked in my previous post.

TheNerdAL
June 20th, 2010, 03:06 AM
It would be cheaper to buy a new one, check out the kit I linked in my previous post.

Lol, that's a little to expensive for me. :P

CharlesA
June 20th, 2010, 03:22 AM
Lol, that's a little to expensive for me. :P

D'oh! I guess it's not a bad price considering it's got a 6 core CPU. :lolflag:

cascade9
June 21st, 2010, 09:11 AM
I also have another question. Is it cheaper to build a computer or upgrade some parts, like I am doing for my 5-6 year old computer or is it cheaper to just buy a computer? :P

Define 'cheaper'.

Minor upgrades are cheap (well, should be) but looking to get the most out of an obsolete system isnt... its farily common for the real 'top of the line' CPUs (and even just good) from any socket type to cost more than a much better CPU new.

If you've got a decetn source for 2nd hand parts, upgrading is very cheap, but no matter what you do, you will never get a 5-6 year old computer to be as fast as something you can buy new.


I might also be moving my old motherboard and CPU to my neighbors computer with the RAM and Power Supply. :P It should be faster for them since their computer is 10 years old. :P

Honestly...bad bad idea.

Swapping out motherboards is the most time intensive hardware task. Its also the most risky. Besides that, you dont even know if your current box has standard ATX mounting holes, or normal switch connectors.

IMO, just leave your current machine in its box, and get a new box. Yeah, yeah, expensive.....but you are going to need CPU, motherboard, RAM, power supply (and possibly video card as well). If money is too tight, dont get a X4 955, get a much cheaper CPU (even a sempron 140 will make your current CPU look as slow as a wet week).

Swagman
June 21st, 2010, 12:40 PM
New cases aren't that expensive... Just depends on what you want.

Choose a case (http://www.overclockers.co.uk/productlist.php?groupid=701&catid=7&rows=0) <--- ok, so that's a UK site. You can still get an idea just how cheaply you can buy a new case for.

Clue.. Cheaper usually means ... sharp edges inside... Stuff like that (lower quality finishing). I've been using a 25 case for my "Ch00ns machine" in the garage for years.

The Ch00ns Machine (http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2376/2201742962_6c6d16d599_b.jpg)

I wanted to buy the Antec 1200 for my new build but "SheWhoMustBeObeyed" decreed my present Thermaltake Shark is still ok.

(That's not the point - Boo Hoo)

TheNerdAL
July 22nd, 2010, 06:22 PM
The CPU and Motherboard I wanted aren't available or sold out. :(

So I looked for another CPU and Motherboard.

Motherboard: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128419

CPU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103687

And this is my current motherboard that will get replaced: http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&docname=c00257657

cascade9
July 22nd, 2010, 06:28 PM
Sure you've got enough space in your case? That HP motherboard is micro-ATX, the gigabyte is full ATX.

BTW, dont forget you will need new RAM, power supply, and probably a video card as well.

TheNerdAL
July 22nd, 2010, 06:36 PM
Sure you've got enough space in your case? That HP motherboard is micro-ATX, the gigabyte is full ATX.

BTW, dont forget you will need new RAM, power supply, and probably a video card as well.

Wow, you're right. Well how do I make sure it is Micro-ATX?

Chessnerd told me: http://ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php?p=9566549&postcount=23

Then how is this micro-ATX Motherboard? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128439

I bought a video card for my computer, would it work with that motherboard? And what power supply should I buy?

cascade9
July 22nd, 2010, 07:19 PM
That HP motherboard is Micro-ATX, but that doesnt mean that the case is....if there is a few inches of room at teh bottom of the motehrboard its probably a full ATX case.

Mind you, I wouldnt try to put a new motherboard into the old HP case. Its just not worth the extra hassle. Better off buying a case, and keep the HP together IMO.

IIRC, you bought a AGP video card, that wont work in newer computers (they have no AGP slot).

As for what power supply, depends on what else you are going to use in your computer, how much money you have, etc..

TheNerdAL
July 22nd, 2010, 07:36 PM
That HP motherboard is Micro-ATX, but that doesnt mean that the case is....if there is a few inches of room at teh bottom of the motehrboard its probably a full ATX case.

Mind you, I wouldnt try to put a new motherboard into the old HP case. Its just not worth the extra hassle. Better off buying a case, and keep the HP together IMO.

IIRC, you bought a AGP video card, that wont work in newer computers (they have no AGP slot).

As for what power supply, depends on what else you are going to use in your computer, how much money you have, etc..

Okay, why is it a good idea to buy a new case? I'm just going to use my computer for basic surfing and maybe trying to animate my cartoon show and Compiz and some gaming like AssaultCube.

cascade9
July 22nd, 2010, 07:52 PM
Several reasons.

1- sometimes 'corporate' computers use non-standard switches, etc. So you might not be able to use the new motherboard in the old case without some soldering work.

2- easier in general. If you build a new computer, you can use the old computer to check out any issues you might have during the building process.

3- I'm sure I saw you post somewhere you were going to give/sell your old computer to your neighbours. Pretty hard to do that without a case.

4- you can get new cases for $15.

TheNerdAL
July 22nd, 2010, 07:55 PM
Several reasons.

1- sometimes 'corporate' computers use non-standard switches, etc. So you might not be able to use the new motherboard in the old case without some soldering work.

2- easier in general. If you build a new computer, you can use the old computer to check out any issues you might have during the building process.

3- I'm sure I saw you post somewhere you were going to give/sell your old computer to your neighbours. Pretty hard to do that without a case.

4- you can get new cases for $15.

15 BUCKS?! :O And I removed the old motherboard and reconnected everything successfully. I don't think it needs soldering. But link me to a good case. I may give my old cpu and motherboard with the ram to the neighbors or sell it to them, idk.

bluelamp999
July 22nd, 2010, 08:04 PM
I notice a lot of recommendations for Gigabyte motherboards in this thread, has anyone encountered problems with the Realtek 8111D LAN chipset (as used in most of them) in Ubuntu?

I run a Gigabyte board myself in my NAS (running FreeNAS) and so far it's been fine.

See the comment on this page - http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductReview.aspx?Item=N82E16813128432

TheNerdAL
July 22nd, 2010, 08:10 PM
I found a cheap one that comes with a power supply: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811154052

cascade9
July 22nd, 2010, 08:20 PM
15 BUCKS?! :O And I removed the old motherboard and reconnected everything successfully. I don't think it needs soldering. But link me to a good case. I may give my old cpu and motherboard with the ram to the neighbors or sell it to them, idk.

Reconnecting to a motherboard that was meant to live in the case is not the same as connecting to a new motherboard...

I wouldnt call any sub-$50 case 'good' but there are plently of them at newegg-

http://www.newegg.com/Store/SubCategory.aspx?SubCategory=7&name=Computer-Cases


I found a cheap one that comes with a power supply: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811154052

Cheap cases, OK. Cheap power supplies, bad idea.



I notice a lot of recommendations for Gigabyte motherboards in this thread, has anyone encountered problems with the Realtek 8111D LAN chipset (as used in most of them) in Ubuntu?

I run a Gigabyte board myself in my NAS (running FreeNAS) and so far it's been fine.

See the comment on this page - http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductReview.aspx?Item=N82E16813128432

I havent run the 8111D with ubuntu, but its been fine with various other distros (including mint, which is pretty much ubuntu anyway).

TheNerdAL
July 22nd, 2010, 08:27 PM
Cheap cases, OK. Cheap power supplies, bad idea.




I havent run the 8111D with ubuntu, but its been fine with various other distros (including mint, which is pretty much ubuntu anyway).

Okay, so a case without a power supply?

How about this power supply? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139005

With this case? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811147112

cascade9
July 23rd, 2010, 09:09 AM
Nice power supply, micro-ATX case.

TheNerdAL
July 24th, 2010, 07:36 PM
Nice power supply, micro-ATX case.

So I'm good to go? ;)

cascade9
July 24th, 2010, 07:52 PM
If you want to be limited to micro-ATX motehrboards, then yeah, its fine.

I'd rather get a full ATX case myself, micro-ATX motherboards go into full ATX just fine.

TheNerdAL
August 1st, 2010, 04:33 AM
It costs about $367.96 with RAM, I think it's a bit too much. I just wanted a new CPU and Motherboard. :P Should I try to see if the motherboard works good in the same old case?