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Directive 4
June 7th, 2010, 12:04 AM
A free plug-in called NoScript, built for the Firefox web browser, includes pop-up warnings about potential clickjacks.
However, it will also query clicks on Flash videos, commonly used on many websites - and it is not easy to install, said Mr Cluley


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/10224434.stm

BoneKracker
June 7th, 2010, 12:23 AM
I've been using it for what must be years, and it's trivial to install (really, about as hard as farting).

:lol:

wilee-nilee
June 7th, 2010, 12:23 AM
The funny thing about noscript that it puts buttons for session allowance and reverse in the customize browser buttons list, it couldn't be much easier then this.

BoneKracker
June 7th, 2010, 12:30 AM
It does have a lot of configuration options, but the defaults are sane and the documentation is accessible.

xpod
June 7th, 2010, 12:40 AM
Mr Cluley ...or should it have been Cluelessly at that particular moment in time, obviously had some issues hitting "install" on the FF Extensions page. :-?
Still though, it`s good to see NoScript being mentioned on the BBC News site. It might encourage a few more people to start using it, which might hopefully cut down on the Windows Scareware infestations that seem to have been rampant these last couple of years. I suppose it`s just as likely that those same people would only uninstall it again after an hour or two of being pestered to allow everything. Just getting most to use standard user accounts online is a job in itself.

Phrea
June 7th, 2010, 12:46 AM
(really, about as hard as farting).

:lol:

Sir, I have been having some bodily complications that made my -normal- solid body waste quite fluid, which in turn, did in fact made quoted statement quite hard.
As you know, the organ in question treats both fluids and gasses very similar, making it hard to distinguish one from the other at times.

I can assure you, sir, passing gas successfully without any 'byproducts' has been a bit of a challenge, to say the least.

Also, come to think of it, this post seems a bit OT, even for OT.

Please continue to discuss the OP, and think of my little post as a vent of frustration with said bodily complications.

Directive 4
June 7th, 2010, 12:55 AM
Why is the alphabet in alphabetical order?

BoneKracker
June 7th, 2010, 01:02 AM
... think of my little post as a vent of frustration ...

No pun intended, of course.

xpod
June 7th, 2010, 01:02 AM
Why is the alphabet in alphabetical order?

So we can sing the Alphabet song of course.:)

K.Mandla
June 7th, 2010, 02:11 AM
The Alphabet Song and Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star are the same tune. :shock:

Now, back to the actual topic: I haven't much faith in the BBC's tech reporting staff. In general I prefer the BBC's news over anything else out there, but their tech staff always strikes me as hopeless. Which is too bad. ...

xpod
June 7th, 2010, 05:42 PM
The Alphabet Song and Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star are the same tune. :shock:

Now, back to the actual topic: I haven't much faith in the BBC's tech reporting staff. In general I prefer the BBC's news over anything else out there, but their tech staff always strikes me as hopeless. Which is too bad. ...


Same tune as Bah Bah Black Sheep too.

And....Some more of that hopeless tech reporting (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/10257411.stm) possibly?


Users running Windows, Macintosh or Linux might all be open to attack.

The company is working to fix the problem. In the meantime, users of Reader, Acrobat and Flash are advised to ensure their anti-virus software is up to date.

"It doesn't really get any worse than a 'zero-day' vulnerability like this," said Graham Cluley,

Wouldn`t AntiVirus be totally useless against Zero Day vulnerabilities?

Directive 4
June 7th, 2010, 05:54 PM
Same tune as Bah Bah Black Sheep too.

And....Some more of that hopeless tech reporting (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/10257411.stm) possibly?



Wouldn`t AntiVirus be totally useless against Zero Day vulnerabilities?



"Whilst it works to fix the problem, "

which it doesn't even know about yet!

those guys at adobe are good...

BoneKracker
June 8th, 2010, 04:29 AM
Wouldn`t AntiVirus be totally useless against Zero Day vulnerabilities?

In reality, most zero-day vulnerabilities are eliminated by fixing the code, and not by interdiction through anti-malware tools. However, some zero-day vulnerabilities reveal new general patterns of attack and/or common flaws which may then be mitigated with anti-malware tools.

So it's not entirely senseless to say this, just hapless boilerplate.

init1
June 8th, 2010, 04:33 AM
A free plug-in called NoScript, built for the Firefox web browser, includes pop-up warnings about potential clickjacks.
However, it will also query clicks on Flash videos, commonly used on many websites - and it is not easy to install, said Mr Cluley


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/10224434.stm
I tried it, but it wouldn't allow me to use Facebook. I tried allowing all scripts on Facebook, but it still wouldn't work.




Wouldn`t AntiVirus be totally useless against Zero Day vulnerabilities?

Not always. Antiviruses stop malware in two ways: by blocking known viruses and by blocking programs with suspicious activity. A zero day vulnerability would not be blocked by it's signature (not immediately, anyway), but an antivirus may detect that it's doing something it shouldn't be.

Ebere
June 8th, 2010, 05:31 AM
I tried it, but it wouldn't allow me to use Facebook. I tried allowing all scripts on Facebook, but it still wouldn't work.

See there !

It WORKS !!!!

;)