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View Full Version : 'Criminal Minds' Episode Explores How Dangerous Social Networking Can Really Be



lovinglinux
June 5th, 2010, 04:03 AM
I found this on the net and thought would be interesting to post, specially considering they used Facebook as an example.


The team even discusses how "surprisingly insecure" social networking sites are, citing Facebook by name as an example of how when they changed privacy settings a few months ago, they inadvertently made everyone's profile viewable.

See full article here (http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/3020994/criminal_minds_episode_explores_how.html).

hansdown
June 5th, 2010, 04:06 AM
I found this on the net and thought would be interesting to post, specially considering they used Facebook as an example.



See full article here (http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/3020994/criminal_minds_episode_explores_how.html).

It is a bit scary.

YuiDaoren
June 5th, 2010, 05:35 AM
You put personal information out there, in hands you don't know you can trust or not and out where anyone can see it, what the heck do you expect will happen? It doesn't even have to be willful, a mistake is enough expose you.

I've never understood what was so attractive about social networking sites. It's always seemed to me that there are better ways to go about keeping in touch with people, all without having to make your life a public spectacle.

Austin25
June 5th, 2010, 05:50 AM
I'm not on facebook.
There is a reason for paranoia.

wojox
June 5th, 2010, 05:52 AM
That's exactly why I don't Social Network. :P

Austin25
June 5th, 2010, 06:14 AM
That's exactly why I don't Social Network. :P
says he on the forums:lolflag:

wojox
June 5th, 2010, 06:28 AM
says he on the forums:lolflag:

You wise guy you. You know what I mean. :P

mmix
June 5th, 2010, 06:39 AM
so anonymous post is important.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anonymous_post

BoneKracker
June 5th, 2010, 06:49 AM
facebook is all about human herd behavior

Our ancestors used to trap herds of mammoths and bison in ravines and kill them with spears and stones.

Modern herds of livestock willingly trot along to their slaughter with little interference by the fat greedy humans who eat them.

Now we are being reduced to similar herd mentality, guided into voting a certain way, giving up our money or becoming a debt-slave for products and services we don't need, or worst of all, stupidly giving up our privacy so we can be even more efficiently and effectively herded.

Sad.

hansdown
June 5th, 2010, 06:55 AM
facebook is all about human herd behavior

Our ancestors used to trap herds of mammoths and bison in ravines and kill them with spears and stones.

Modern herds of livestock willingly trot along to their slaughter with little interference by the fat greedy humans who eat them.

Now we are being reduced to similar herd mentality, guided into voting a certain way, giving up our money or becoming a debt-slave for products and services we don't need, or worst of all, stupidly giving up our privacy so we can be even more efficiently and effectively herded.

Sad.

Wow!

Nice poetry BoneKracker!

sydbat
June 5th, 2010, 04:56 PM
facebook is all about human herd behavior

Our ancestors used to trap herds of mammoths and bison in ravines and kill them with spears and stones.

Modern herds of livestock willingly trot along to their slaughter with little interference by the fat greedy humans who eat them.

Now we are being reduced to similar herd mentality, guided into voting a certain way, giving up our money or becoming a debt-slave for products and services we don't need, or worst of all, stupidly giving up our privacy so we can be even more efficiently and effectively herded.

Sad.It's true. Soylent Green is people!

And my wife and I watch Criminal Minds, even though many episodes end up disturbing us. This one was one of the last episodes this season. My wife looked at me and asked how the best way to prevent this kind of thing from really happening, and I told her we needed to sell everything and live in another galaxy. She wasn't impressed.

donkyhotay
June 5th, 2010, 05:39 PM
It's true. My wife looked at me and asked how the best way to prevent this kind of thing from really happening, and I told her we needed to sell everything and live in another galaxy.

You don't need to do that, you just need to be educated and understand that anything you post online can be back traced to you and everything posted on something like facebook will be sold to the highest bidder and *then* traced back to you. I ran into this argument with some of my family members. They all use facebook and were trying to get me to use it (this was about a year ago before facebook issues became as serious as they are now.) I was telling them I was concerned about giving them info and they said "Oh just sign up for a fake name". I then pointed out to them if I use a fake name and 'friend' all of them then it would be pretty obvious we were related and can probably deduce who I am from that. From there it would just take one post from one of them of "don't forget the family reunion <my real name>" or "How are you doing at <some of hobbies>" for facebook to get more information about me that will then be sold off. Sure you can do similar things with forums, I mean if you do a search of my posts you'll probably be able to figure out I'm an ubuntu user, I prefer using FOSS software but will use proprietary if necessary, I enjoy playing online games (especially HoN recently), and do a little bit of coding in my spare time. All of which I'm ok sharing with random people on the net. However I can't control information on a social network site as easily, *especially* when they're commercial (wanting to make a profit) and they change their terms and conditions at whim (usually to help them increase their profits).

BoneKracker
June 6th, 2010, 02:58 AM
It's true. Soylent Green is people!

And my wife and I watch Criminal Minds, even though many episodes end up disturbing us. This one was one of the last episodes this season. My wife looked at me and asked how the best way to prevent this kind of thing from really happening, and I told her we needed to sell everything and live in another galaxy. She wasn't impressed.

:lol:

Protecting freedom of speech is the most important way to prevent this kind of thing from happening.

dragos240
June 6th, 2010, 03:04 AM
And that is the reason I don't use socal networking sites.

cprofitt
June 6th, 2010, 05:19 AM
I prefer the approach that if someone wants my information they will get it... so hiding it is not likely to work. (Schneierism)

I do fear the information that is out there... but the social sites are 'visible' while my spending habits are likely being monitored by several 'businesses', the government and, at the same time, leaking out.

BoneKracker
June 6th, 2010, 05:49 AM
I prefer the approach that if someone wants my information they will get it... so hiding it is not likely to work. (Schneierism)

I do fear the information that is out there... but the social sites are 'visible' while my spending habits are likely being monitored by several 'businesses', the government and, at the same time, leaking out.

I believe in a slightly different approach:

Protect my information as best I can (within reason), but assume I can never be entirely successful in doing so.

mikewhatever
June 6th, 2010, 05:58 AM
I believe in a slightly different approach:

Protect my information as best I can (within reason), but assume I can never be entirely successful in doing so.

Can you do it on Facebook? Apparently, the people that run the site can change privacy settings to suite their needs or make the settings very hard to find. It's simply against Facebook's interests to allow to much privacy.

BoneKracker
June 6th, 2010, 06:12 AM
Can you do it on Facebook? Apparently, the people that run the site can change privacy settings to suite their needs or make the settings very hard to find. It's simply against Facebook's interests to allow to much privacy.
I would not think so. I also wouldn't trust them, now that they've shown their true colors.

mikewhatever
June 6th, 2010, 07:07 AM
It's still a long way to go, but apparently, quite a few ubuntu-forums users (apart from a bunch of privacy geniuses) seem to understand the problem with Facebook and care about their privacy. I also know several real life people who quit Facebook over privacy concerns. It's encouraging.

BoneKracker
June 6th, 2010, 07:29 AM
It's still a long way to go, but apparently, quite a few ubuntu-forums users (apart from a bunch of privacy geniuses) seem to understand the problem with Facebook and care about their privacy. I also know several real life people who quit Facebook over privacy concerns. It's encouraging.

But your avatar is waving a red flag. Aren't communism and privacy more or less orthogonal?

mikewhatever
June 6th, 2010, 07:45 AM
But your avatar is waving a red flag. Aren't communism and privacy more or less orthogonal?

No, not at all. We can't discuss it here without breaking the forum ban on politics, but let me say this: the flag is just a symbol, and 'I consider symbols to be for the symbol minded' (just to borrow from J. Carlin). It's somewhat unfortunate that it's so associated with communism.

johnb820
June 6th, 2010, 07:58 AM
I am not so worried about privacy on facebook as I am the addiction and lie of social gratification the site produces. It seems people can only be social if it's pixels on the internet or alcohol in real life.

BoneKracker
June 6th, 2010, 08:03 AM
... the flag is just a symbol, and 'I consider symbols to be for the symbol minded' (just to borrow from J. Carlin). It's somewhat unfortunate that it's so associated with communism.

Well, the symbol you're using there happens to be the logo of Red Flag Linux, which is a Chinese distribution that was sponsored by the Chinese government.

So I don't there's much ambiguity about what the red flag means. :lol:

seanelly
June 6th, 2010, 08:37 AM
We all have to give up privacy in our day to day lives. The question is, do the concerns over Facebook's privacy outweigh the site's benefits? As of right now, for myself, nope. The few privacy options I wish Facebook had are now available and my account settings are now satisfactory. Many of the photos of me that are on Facebook would be on there regardless of my participation because I go to social events where people take pictures. A big thanks to those who have raised a stink about the issue though...

mikewhatever
June 6th, 2010, 08:50 AM
We all have to give up privacy in our day to day lives. The question is, do the concerns over Facebook's privacy outweigh the site's benefits? As of right now, for myself, nope. The few privacy options I wish Facebook had are now available and my account settings are now satisfactory. Many of the photos of me that are on Facebook would be on there regardless of my participation because I go to social events where people take pictures. A big thanks to those who have raised a stink about the issue though...

Well, the problem with Facebook is not whether there is a privacy setting or whether you care or not. If it suites your needs, fine, no one is forcing you to quit. The problem is their complete and utter disregard for their users privacy. Can they change, or more precisely, can they be coerced to change? May be. Will they fundamentally change? I doubt it.

BoneKracker
June 6th, 2010, 09:03 AM
Well, the problem with Facebook is not whether there is a privacy setting or whether you care or not. If it suites your needs, fine, no one is forcing you to quit. The problem is their complete and utter disregard for their users privacy. Can they change, or more precisely, can they be coerced to change? May be. Will they fundamentally change? I doubt it.

I agree. As I've said before, there are legal principles to consider here.

You can't violate somebody's privacy by looking at them as they are walking down the street or reading what's printed on their t-shirt. But if you peep in someone's bedroom window or read their unopened mail, you are violating their privacy. Why?

It's because a rational person in those situations either does or doesn't have a "reasonable expectation of privacy".

You don't have a "reasonable expectation" that nobody is going to look at you or read your t-shirt while you are walking down the street. But you do have a "reasonable expectation" that nobody is going to to peep into your bedroom window or read your unopened mail.

In this case, when they changed the rules without telling people, the leadership at Facebook exposed information that they had given people a "reasonable expectation" would be private. That's a gross breech of privacy, in my opinion.

drdread
June 6th, 2010, 09:18 AM
facebook is all about human herd behavior

Our ancestors used to trap herds of mammoths and bison in ravines and kill them with spears and stones.

Modern herds of livestock willingly trot along to their slaughter with little interference by the fat greedy humans who eat them.

Now we are being reduced to similar herd mentality, guided into voting a certain way, giving up our money or becoming a debt-slave for products and services we don't need, or worst of all, stupidly giving up our privacy so we can be even more efficiently and effectively herded.

Sad.

righton!

so eloquently said