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jay bone
June 1st, 2010, 08:45 PM
Greetings everyone - this is my first post.

I have a few questions pertaining to Ubuntu, computers and software.

Question #1 - Computer:
I'm in the market for a new laptop. I'm a student and have used Windows my entire life. I'm familiar with OpenOffice, Gimp and a few other open source programs and I've been nothing but impressed. I have just recently discovered Ubuntu and Linux due to a friend who swears by them.

I've had my eye on the new Macbook Pro 15 - either the 2.53GHz or the 2.66GHz. However, after speaking with quite a few people - they say I can get an equally great or even better(in terms of guts and performance) machine for half of the cost.

This entices me as I'd rather get the most bang for my buck instead of paying for a name, plus, I've used Mac's at the University and I don't care for their operating system.

Can someone point me in the right direction in terms of what they might choose over a Macbook pro?

Question #2 - Operating System and Software:
The main reason I am interested in a Macbook is because I do a lot of music/recording stuff. It seems that finding software for a PC equivalent to a Mac is tough. One reason I like a Mac is because I can open the laptop, open a program, hit record and just sing/play into it - with decent quality. It's nice for getting ideas down. I've yet to be able to do this on a PC with similar quality.

I also use Adobe CS4 - mainly Photoshop and Dreamweaver as I do some personal graphic and web design. I know that installing these on Ubuntu is not possible.

So, is there software out there for Ubuntu that would be similar to what comes installed on a Mac for recording purposes?

I also heard one can run a dual - boot (is that the right terminology?), therefore if I needed to, I could always revert back to my windows OS when I needed to work with Ps or Dw.

I do appreciate it if you made it this far. thanks in advance for any responses and any links or reading material that points me in the right direction.

jay bone

j.bell730
June 1st, 2010, 09:03 PM
Sorry, I cannot answer your first question, as I do not have a laptop. I've heard that you can get good ones from System76. Though, I have no idea how compatible they would be with Windows, in case you would like to dual boot.


Question #2 - Operating System and Software:
The main reason I am interested in a Macbook is because I do a lot of music/recording stuff. It seems that finding software for a PC equivalent to a Mac is tough. One reason I like a Mac is because I can open the laptop, open a program, hit record and just sing/play into it - with decent quality. It's nice for getting ideas down. I've yet to be able to do this on a PC with similar quality.

I also use Adobe CS4 - mainly Photoshop and Dreamweaver as I do some personal graphic and web design. I know that installing these on Ubuntu is not possible.

So, is there software out there for Ubuntu that would be similar to what comes installed on a Mac for recording purposes?

I also heard one can run a dual - boot (is that the right terminology?), therefore if I needed to, I could always revert back to my windows OS when I needed to work with Ps or Dw.

I do appreciate it if you made it this far. thanks in advance for any responses and any links or reading material that points me in the right direction.

jay bone

For the recording, look at Audacity (http://audacity.sourceforge.net/). I'm not sure about the quality, as I don't use it, myself.
You can install Dreamweaver CS4 (http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=version&iId=14343). Google has also invested into getting Photoshop CS4 (http://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=version&iId=14318)'s compatibility better, so we'll have to wait and see how that turns out. Currently, it's rated a silver, which means you can get it to work, but not without a little hacking.

Also, yes you can dual boot (that's the right term, yes!).

Paddy Landau
June 1st, 2010, 09:12 PM
The best thing for you to do is to take your existing computer and load Ubuntu as a dual-boot. In other words, you'll have both Windows and Ubuntu on it.

The easiest way to do this is to install Wubi (http://wubi-installer.org/) on Windows. Please be aware that Wubi is fantastic for experimenting and playing, but do not rely on it long-term as it can get corrupted quite easily.

You can then experiment to your heart's content to find out whether Ubuntu will live up to your expectations.

If not, simply uninstall Wubi, and no harm done.

If it does do what you want and need, uninstall Wubi, and install Ubuntu properly as a dual boot. Or, buy a computer without Windows (so that you don't pay for the Windows license), and install Ubuntu on it. Before choosing your laptop, check that it is Ubuntu-certified, because that will ensure that all the hardware is fully compatible.

jay bone
June 1st, 2010, 09:12 PM
thank you so much for your quick reply. I am checking out some of those laptops as we speak.

I use Audacity on my PC right now and it's not very good IMO. Perhaps I haven't used it to it's full capacity but it just does not compare to what garage band can do (comes installed on Macs and is very simple to use).

thanks again!! :popcorn:

mapes12
June 1st, 2010, 09:21 PM
In blue:-


Greetings everyone - this is my first post.

I have a few questions pertaining to Ubuntu, computers and software.

Question #1 - Computer:
I'm in the market for a new laptop. I'm a student and have used Windows my entire life. I'm familiar with OpenOffice, Gimp and a few other open source programs and I've been nothing but impressed. I have just recently discovered Ubuntu and Linux due to a friend who swears by them.

I've had my eye on the new Macbook Pro 15 - either the 2.53GHz or the 2.66GHz. However, after speaking with quite a few people - they say I can get an equally great or even better(in terms of guts and performance) machine for half of the cost.

This entices me as I'd rather get the most bang for my buck instead of paying for a name, plus, I've used Mac's at the University and I don't care for their operating system.

Can someone point me in the right direction in terms of what they might choose over a Macbook pro?

I've always gone for IBM Lenovo Thinkpads because I heard the Ubu developers use them, hence the hardware is well supported. All the Thinkpads I've had work fine with UBU and you can get a great 2nd user spec machine off the likes of eBay. If you're in the market for a new machine with UBU ready to go out of the box then try these guys. (http://www.linuxemporium.co.uk/hardware/hardware-laptops.html)

Question #2 - Operating System and Software:
The main reason I am interested in a Macbook is because I do a lot of music/recording stuff. It seems that finding software for a PC equivalent to a Mac is tough. One reason I like a Mac is because I can open the laptop, open a program, hit record and just sing/play into it - with decent quality. It's nice for getting ideas down. I've yet to be able to do this on a PC with similar quality.

I also use Adobe CS4 - mainly Photoshop and Dreamweaver as I do some personal graphic and web design. I know that installing these on Ubuntu is not possible. KompoZer (http://kompozer.net/) is good but not as good as Dreamweaver. You could try Dreamweaver in Ubu via Wine but I've not had much look with Wine. Have a look at dual booting (http://members.iinet.net.au/~herman546/index.html)

So, is there software out there for Ubuntu that would be similar to what comes installed on a Mac for recording purposes?

I also heard one can run a dual - boot (is that the right terminology?), therefore if I needed to, I could always revert back to my windows OS when I needed to work with Ps or Dw.

I do appreciate it if you made it this far. thanks in advance for any responses and any links or reading material that points me in the right direction.

jay bone

7G Operator
June 1st, 2010, 09:31 PM
With regards to your first question, couldn't tell you dude sorry. With regard to your second question, i've been using music recording software for about 6 or 7 years, on P.C, tatting a bit with Acid (to mix the old d'n'b), Cubase mainly though, for live recording of multiple tracks in real-time, (external soundcard via firewire) with plug-ins, vsts's and what not =P.
Cubase when you get the hang of it, is an awesome program (IMHO). I switched to Ubuntu a few years back, and until recently didn't really get involved in looking into music production/recording on this o/s. I must add i have constantly been asking over the last few years when some kind people might be able to get cubase up and running on wine, it never seems to happen (to be fair probably for good reason). It would involve (in my limited understanding) a bit of a drop in latency, due to having to emulate a different o/s. And so i stumbled across a bit of a gem (which i will be honest i have not fully tested thew full capoabilities of, but even so;) about Linux. It's ability to implement almost zero latency recording via whats called a R-T kernel (Real-Time). I installed this on Karmic and tweaked a few kernel settings (something to do with priority of processing rtcprio or something(?) and Memlock.
If you want to find out about music producion/recording/sequencing/mastering yadda yadda applications, on Ubuntu, perhaps scoping out 'Ubuntu studio' would be a worthwhile idea, as it is tailored more specifically to those musical (artistic i suppose, as it does involve video tools as well but the majority is music related) people out there. As seems to be aforementioned Audacity is alright, it is a long way off from the pretty and fluid usability of Cubase, but its heading in the right direction, and although it may not have the looks quite yet, it certainly seems to be attaining the functionality. I have not yet truly experimented with it on a semi-pro scale though (multiple live recording scenario) as i am using but a humble netbook, and unless i get a usb external soundcard (which i currently dont have) multiple recording is kinda limited if ya get me =P. I have yet to properly look into the possibility of using a microphone in the side, on board microphone engaged for dual track simultaneous recording, although the soundcard looks like it might be able to from the settings im seeing. This would be good for sampling or recording simple acoustic tracks.
Anyways rather than install the full ubuntu studio edition (as i am using netbook ubuntu and i quite like it. I instead....

*Downloaded R-T kernel (when i was using Karmic, don't think official one is out for Lucid yet)
*Tweaked R-T kernel settings. (tatted about changing rcprio and memlock(i tink?)
*Checked out Ubuntu studio website and then just downloaded the apps i thought i might use manually.

Anyways i know this is hardly an extensive guide, but it might give you a few more thoughts on the subject.

To be fair i haven't yet tried out Audacity for much more than converting files from wav e.t.c, and changing tempo of a few songs (wanted to scope out its 'mixing potential') but i have read that there is a more modular approach with music production on Linux, which to start out could be somewhat confusing, but if your used to live music then the mish-mash of wires to various stomp-boxes/effects pedals e.t.c in essense patchbays;) i suppose is a somewhat similar comparison.
Might try and get more into music on this netbook, with Ubuntu, see what stuff i can get up to. Keep us posted on your experiences dude, and i'll try and offer advice where i can ;)

- Dan

7G Operator
June 1st, 2010, 09:44 PM
P.s even if i did have an external usb soundcard, i'm not convinced i would be able to have more than say 2 channels simulataneously anyways, as there would obviously be technical limitations on the data throughput for usb. Perhaps simulatenous usb mic's in each usb socket, would be the only viable way of getting 'multiple channels' on a netbook ;). Or some sort of premixer, before entry via usb. ;), but then your sorta defeating the point of any computer software, other than eq'ing/mastering the general mix. I suppose getting a better computer and better hardware would be the solution to this dillemma ;).

Darn it, i need better equipment!!! A few analogue pre-amps would be nice as well!!!!

- Dan

'Nevermind digitals closest representation. it's all about the pure analogue energy wave baby!'

7G Operator
June 1st, 2010, 09:57 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ubuntu_Studio

Although its wikipedia, there might be some useful reading here for you, particularly with regards to the R-T kernel ;)

7G Operator
June 1st, 2010, 10:11 PM
I've just thought with regard to your first question, if you are thinking of using the PC now or in the future for sound recording in a serious fashion. Getting a laptop with firewire ability, would be a thought, but then you'd probably want an external soundcard, and what is the compatability of that in Ubuntu like? If anyone has any experience with this i would actually be intrigued to know myself.

Cheers

- Dan