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csyoen
May 24th, 2010, 07:48 AM
Hello together,

I have ubuntu installed on my computer and want to give the following default rights to one user on the filesystem:

files:
rw-r-----

and for folders:

rwxr-x---

I think I have to use umask for this, but I don't know how to specify whether I configure the umask for files or for folders ?

Maybe I don't have to use the umask - command for this ?

Many thanks for your help,

Best regards,
Claude

jbrown96
May 24th, 2010, 07:52 AM
man umask

csyoen
May 24th, 2010, 07:57 AM
Hi jbrown96 (http://ubuntuforums.org/member.php?u=304717).

Many thanks for this help. But I tried this out yet, and I could not find the solution.

That's the reason why I posted this question in this forum.

Are you sure you have found the solution by using

man umask

or even

man 2 umask ???

Best,
Claude

ublintu
May 24th, 2010, 08:14 AM
Hi,

You can change it like this.
chmod u=rw,g=rx,o= files

Are you looking for this?

Lucky.
May 24th, 2010, 08:21 AM
I don't know how to set the umask for a single user, but I know how to do it for all users.

Edit: /etc/profile

On the very last line there it should say the following by default:



umask 022


To have all newly created files and folders have permissions of rw-r----- and rwxr-x--- you will want to change the umask to



umask 027


Save the file, reboot, and you should be good.

However this will only change new files and folders that are created. Everything else will still probably be as it was before.

I hope this helps!

csyoen
May 24th, 2010, 08:21 AM
Sorry, but this doesn't work too:

chmod: Ungültiger Modus: „u=rw,“
„chmod --help“ gibt weitere Informationen.


Sorry my system is in german, but as you can see, the mode u=rw is not recognized.

ublintu
May 24th, 2010, 08:24 AM
sorry, I changed it
chmod u=rw,g=rx,o= files

csyoen
May 24th, 2010, 08:25 AM
Thank you Lucky, this worked fine.

You only have to write umask 027 in command line and the umask is set for this session.

Thanks again.

Problem solved, now I have to try to understand why it worked like this ;-)

csyoen
May 24th, 2010, 08:27 AM
For a single user, I think you have to put the mask in the file

.bashrc

in it's home directory

Best

Lucky.
May 24th, 2010, 09:11 AM
For a single user, I think you have to put the mask in the file

.bashrc



Thanks csyoen, I will try that out!

ublintu
May 24th, 2010, 09:24 AM
Single user -R
http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/misc/31582-permissions-single-user.html