PDA

View Full Version : [gnome] How to lock down Gnome for guest users



meadmarc
May 21st, 2010, 05:37 AM
Good evening!

I am volunteering to set up a computer lab for a small private school on an extremely limited budget. I love Ubuntu for my home, and on my server at work, but have never used it in a school before.

I would like to "lock down" all the control panels, pretty much everything except for a few applications (open office, firefox, and some educational games, of course). I don't want the students (who will be automatically logged in as guests) to be able to make changes, or unintentionally mess things up.

Is there an easy way to do this?

Alternatively, at the public school I work at, we use Windows (sigh) that has been "frozen" using a program called Deep Freeze (similar to windows "steady-state"), which causes any changes a user my make revert back to default when rebooted. Is there a Linux equivalent? That may work too!

Jakiejake
May 21st, 2010, 06:11 AM
Try Edubuntu http://edubuntu.org/
It is made for schools

bobzr
May 21st, 2010, 11:34 AM
Sabayon should help : http://live.gnome.org/Sabayon/
Sabayon is geared towards anyone who has need of providing a standardized GNOME desktop to their end users. Teachers who administer labs, Libraries, and Businesses all have need to have a "locked down" desktop, and can make good use of Sabayon

Jakiejake
May 21st, 2010, 01:23 PM
Sabayon should help : http://live.gnome.org/Sabayon/
Sabayon is geared towards anyone who has need of providing a standardized GNOME desktop to their end users. Teachers who administer labs, Libraries, and Businesses all have need to have a "locked down" desktop, and can make good use of Sabayon

Edubuntu Is focused mainly on education
Saybon hogs all your ram and cpu and if you have a graphics card it will hog that too!
And Well you know what the school computers are like

meadmarc
May 22nd, 2010, 02:18 PM
Sabayon appears to be just what I am looking for, although the thin-client model offered by Edubuntu will also need some consideration.

I did not notice a difference in performance; the computers are about 5 years old, and have 1 GB of ram. Really, them seem to do okay with it running, and I can switch back to a privileged user easily, which is nice.

Are there other options that would be less RAM intensive if this does become a problem?

Jakiejake
May 23rd, 2010, 08:37 AM
Sabayon appears to be just what I am looking for, although the thin-client model offered by Edubuntu will also need some consideration.

I did not notice a difference in performance; the computers are about 5 years old, and have 1 GB of ram. Really, them seem to do okay with it running, and I can switch back to a privileged user easily, which is nice.

Are there other options that would be less RAM intensive if this does become a problem?

Try Edubuntu with a XFCE Interface http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xfce
Or xbuntu http://www.xubuntu.org/ (Ubuntu with Xfce interface) Great for old pc's or pc's with low specs

Jakiejake
May 23rd, 2010, 08:39 AM
Oh and don't forget the lightweight ubuntu http://lubuntu.net/ it uses LXDE

meadmarc
May 28th, 2010, 12:11 AM
Okay-

I have discovered the wonder of the thin client, and am now running Gnome over LTSP.

This may be off the radar of the point of this post, but I am now trying to minimize the image footprint to maximize the number of clients I can have.

But here goes:

1. Does LXDE allow me to make menu profiles to keep kids out of things I don't want them to have? (Does Sabayon work with it, or something similar?)

2. Would that LXDE increase the number of clients I can connect in an appreciable way?

Thanks in advance!

pzkfw
May 28th, 2010, 12:43 AM
Just a thought:

Most of the gnome's control panels/configuration editors are actually packages. If you apt-get remove all the packages then they can't change anything unless they knew EXACTLY where to edit a file in the terminal which is highly unlikely.

meadmarc
May 28th, 2010, 03:17 AM
Actually, I had begun thinking about that myself.... So I could uninstall anything I don't want them to have access to, and all the Admin items are password protected anyway.

Actually, I could go over a lot of the packages and uninstall unnecessary processes and such to try to lighten the load.

And actually the lockdown editor lets me kill their command line access so that's one less risk (not much of one anyway, the school only goes as far as 6th grade!)

Thanks!

Know of any "dead weight" that I should look at?

Thanks!

Jakiejake
May 28th, 2010, 07:07 AM
Actually, I had begun thinking about that myself.... So I could uninstall anything I don't want them to have access to, and all the Admin items are password protected anyway.

Actually, I could go over a lot of the packages and uninstall unnecessary processes and such to try to lighten the load.

And actually the lockdown editor lets me kill their command line access so that's one less risk (not much of one anyway, the school only goes as far as 6th grade!)

Thanks!

Know of any "dead weight" that I should look at?

Thanks!

Aye I was doing CMD on windows at like grade 5 or earlier as far as I can remember

mike555
May 28th, 2010, 12:12 PM
You could shut down services you don't use in ; System > Preferences > Startup apps .... things like Ubuntuone, brail, bluetooth, etc.

hok00age
August 13th, 2010, 10:28 PM
Good evening!

I am volunteering to set up a computer lab for a small private school on an extremely limited budget. I love Ubuntu for my home, and on my server at work, but have never used it in a school before.

I would like to "lock down" all the control panels, pretty much everything except for a few applications (open office, firefox, and some educational games, of course). I don't want the students (who will be automatically logged in as guests) to be able to make changes, or unintentionally mess things up.

Is there an easy way to do this?

Alternatively, at the public school I work at, we use Windows (sigh) that has been "frozen" using a program called Deep Freeze (similar to windows "steady-state"), which causes any changes a user my make revert back to default when rebooted. Is there a Linux equivalent? That may work too!
Follow my thread:
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1550489