PDA

View Full Version : Mint Linux?



Nick_Jinn
May 14th, 2010, 03:08 PM
I love Ubuntu. I have not really been impressed with any other distro I have tried except maybe Suse. Ubuntu has been pretty cool....but buggy sometimes....and not always that user friendly for non geeks. The amount of trouble shooting and even hardware problems....like seriously messing up the format on your MP3 player despite just using it as an external hard drive for example....its been challenging.


So how do you feel about mint users? Do you feel like they are an extended part of your own community? Turn coats maybe? Competition? Basically similar besides a few minor tweaks?


If you like mint, what does it have to offer that Ubuntu doesnt? Perhaps a little easier without having to **** with the command line? Command line really is the doman of geeks, for the most part....unless you make it simple with saved commands in a visual interface.


It is generally a little behind Ubuntu in some ways? A little ahead in others?


I really could not possibly care less about avoiding proproetary software or even breaking any laws.....just as long as it works and works really easily without having to tweak my computer as a hobby. I dont enjoy hacking my computer just to get it to work, but I also want something free, cheaper than a mac and more stable with less viruses than windows, and I dont want to feel like my OS is data mining for the corporations or government....so windows is out and Macs are expensive. Linux seems like the right choice, but I dislike a lot of the distros and Ubuntu isnt really as geared for the masses as I hoped it was....but maybe its getting better?

Does it sound like I would link mint?


One advantage Ubuntu seems to have is this community forum. Great stuff.....is Mint similar enough that I could get help right here in the Ubuntu forums?

HermanAB
May 14th, 2010, 03:43 PM
Hmm, Ubuntu isn't really the easiest Linux. That crown belongs to Puppy Linux, with Mandriva second. Ubuntu is kinda intermediate and that may be why it is popular - it doesn't spoon feed users too much.

ellgor
May 14th, 2010, 03:51 PM
Hi,

You certainly can, Mint even has its own forums, and most things work straight off, I'm a Mint user and have never looked elsewhere.

Regards, Ellgor.

_0R10N
May 14th, 2010, 04:00 PM
I couldn't express my opinion on your comment, because of two things: I didn't tried Mint, and I don't see a competition between different Linux distros.

But what I do want to say is that the use of the command line could be a geek-land, but will give you definetely the power to accomplish things otherwise impossibles with just clicks.

For me, the command line is just a matter of efficiency (most of the times). Let's say you have to create several directories nested this way:

/Folder1/Folder2/Folder3/Folder4/Folder5


Isn't it easier to just mkdir -p /Folder1/Folder2/Folder3/Folder4/Folder5, instead of all the right-clicking and typing, required by Nautilus?

Examples like this one, are plenty... is just a matter of getting used.

dca
May 14th, 2010, 05:04 PM
By installing the 'ubuntu-restricted-extras' meta-package from repos gives you most of the missing codec functionality (MP3, MP4, AAC) that Mint provides. SLAB menu also available from repos. I guess that would make for a very user-friendly distro:

Easy:

Linux Mint
PC Linux OS
Puppy


Intermediate:
Ubuntu
Fedora
openSUSE
Mandriva

Expert:
Gentoo
Slackware
Debian

...I know everyone will disagree, but when talking to user(s) who've never heard of a Linux distro, the above is kinda' how I approach it....

Grenage
May 14th, 2010, 05:08 PM
It will be a sad day when people look down on others for using other distros. It's bad enough when people moan about Windows.

smellyman
May 14th, 2010, 05:58 PM
Mint is fine....maybe prettier and intsalled extras make it more noob friendly.

I also wouldn't call Puppy an easy distro for beginners. Frugal installs, pupsave files, Rox file manager, sea monkey, many many foreign programs, connection manager etc. That freaks non geeks out.

that being said what Puppy does is truly amazing and by far my favorite distro and all its puplets to play with. Barry Kauler did amazing work...

adam22
May 14th, 2010, 10:53 PM
Mint is alright. It's really just a themed up version of Ubuntu, but it's a little harder to find information about problems and fixes through a search again (from my experience).

I don't care that much for the menu in the Gnome version, but I really liked the LXDE version.

yester64
May 14th, 2010, 11:13 PM
Haven't used Mint myself, but here is what i understand.

Mint includes upon installation all restricted drivers and/or libraries. So you want play a DRM DVD. No problem with that.
Any other distro, as far as i know, will require you to put hands on the system and install it afterwards.

I used Ubuntu and now in Suse Land.
But from what i experiences, neither is hard to make work.

And that is also the main complain you read in forums across the board. Most people want to play dvd's and not having to install additional libraries.
So if you in that camp, Mint should be the right step. The best is to try it out.

GarmaZed
May 15th, 2010, 01:25 AM
I've tried Mint 7 before, I think. It was a great distro, but for some reason I had some issues with Flash on it, much like earlier versions of Ubuntu for me.

Overall Mint does make a strong effort to make the computer more user-friendly and compatible right out of the install. Personally, I enjoy the heritage and larger community of Ubuntu more, and that's what is convincing me to use 10.04 primarily (that and it works so well).

snowpine
May 15th, 2010, 01:34 AM
I've never been a Mint user, but I recently took a Mint Fluxbox Live CD for a test drive. It was a pretty solid Fluxbox experience; I've always been a little disappointed with Canonical for not making an official Fluxbuntu. :(

ubunterooster
May 15th, 2010, 02:00 AM
I've used Mint. It has a great interface and is simpler. If you use it you benefit from the Ubuntu repos and Forums as many Mint users are also here and Mint is ubuntu based

aysiu
May 15th, 2010, 02:08 AM
It is generally a little behind Ubuntu in some ways? A little ahead in others? Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu. In fact, it pretty much is Ubuntu, with some changed defaults and a few custom menus and artwork. So, by definition, it is behind Ubuntu in that sense that Ubuntu must exist for Linux Mint to exist. Linux Mint releases tend to be about a month behind Ubuntu releases. On the other hand, if you like the customization in Mint, you could consider it ahead of Ubuntu, since it has everything Ubuntu has to offer (since Mint basically is Ubuntu) but then has added tweaks and such.

Rodney9
May 15th, 2010, 02:13 AM
I've never been a Mint user, but I recently took a Mint Fluxbox Live CD for a test drive. It was a pretty solid Fluxbox experience; I've always been a little disappointed with Canonical for not making an official Fluxbuntu. :(

I agree a Fluxbuntu would be fabulous for old computers as well for new ones, for people who just want speed not candy.

snowpine
May 15th, 2010, 02:48 AM
I agree a Fluxbuntu would be fabulous for old computers as well for new ones, for people who just want speed not candy.

Good thing Mint Fluxbox exists. :)

AntiX and sidux are also pretty groovy Fluxbox distros. (Though lately Openbox has become more fashionable for some reason...)

tgalati4
May 15th, 2010, 04:15 AM
Mint saves you time when installing on a neighbor's computer. It works out of the box and reduces the number of support phone calls that you will get when multimedia doesn't work.

adam22
May 15th, 2010, 04:32 AM
LXDE>Fluxbox

ubunterooster
May 15th, 2010, 04:39 AM
mint [lxde] works fast in virtual box.

23dornot23d
May 15th, 2010, 04:43 AM
Mint is a great Distro and so is Ubuntu .... and they run side by side on the same machine

So you do not need to choose one or the other ,,,,, use both .....

or if you prefer just one .... flip a coin ......

The latest release ,,, of Mint (http://www.linuxmint.com/) 9 ,,, .> Download sites (http://www.linuxmint.com/edition.php?id=52)

ssulaco
May 15th, 2010, 04:44 AM
LXDE>Fluxbox
Lubuntu = http://lubuntu.net/

oldsoundguy
May 15th, 2010, 04:46 AM
Linux Mint is just a modified version of Ubuntu and uses the same repositories.
I have the latest of the Mint builds on a box and it installs EVERYTHING including the RESTRICTED and NON-FREE thing such as drivers and even codec files for the players.

But it leaves you little choice as to what is installed out of the box and if you want to change something such as the default video player or sound player .. you DO have to uninstall them and install your new choice and then those drivers and codec files.

And I really do NOT like the menu system .. clunky for navigating, but for someone coming from windows that just HAS to have icons for doing things .. a good beginning choice to get into Linux.

NormanFLinux
May 15th, 2010, 04:59 AM
I would say the various flavors of PCLOS are champs. Almost everything need to run a computer out of the box is pre-installed, Windows style control center called PC Control Center and of course what else? Synaptic. You can even forget its an RPM-based distro. Just install it and forget it!

ubunterooster
May 15th, 2010, 05:00 AM
True, soundguy. It is a very nice OS but comes more "as is", for better and worse.

Nick_Jinn
May 15th, 2010, 05:05 AM
Hmm, Ubuntu isn't really the easiest Linux. That crown belongs to Puppy Linux, with Mandriva second. Ubuntu is kinda intermediate and that may be why it is popular - it doesn't spoon feed users too much.


What you are saying is true, but I think its unfortunate. I think they may have failed at their mission.

I want to be very clear about this....I am NOT saying Ubuntu is a bad distro. Its probably one of the best in a lot of ways. It has the best community, lots of customization, all kinds of features that set it apart from others in a good way....and yes, power users/geeks and intermediate users alike can benefit.


But has Ubuntu lived up to its promise of being the distro 'for everyone'? In my opinion, no. They have not. Ubunut is NOT ready for noobs, and most people are novices. Ubuntu is not an appropriate distro for most people. Many people cant even connect to the internet, and their experience is over before it started.

In my opinion, I did not interpret Ubuntu to be an OS "By hackers for Hackers". However, the Linux geeks have pushed Ubuntu in the direction of increased complexity and customization.....true to the philosophy of Linux, but perhaps not so true to the philosophy of Ubuntu....I am not a geek, and as great and supportive as this community tends to be, I still encounter elitism and people sneering down their nose when people say they dont want to master the command line just to watch a movie or get online. How is that compatible with being the distro for the common man? In my opinion, it is not.

I suggest either change your mission statement/philosophy or perhaps start spoon feeding it to people more...because that is exactly what the masses want. Their days are hard enough. This isnt a hobby for most people. They dont care about **** waiving or principles between purely open source or proprietary They just want their computer to work. They are not expecting a copy of windows necessarily, but it shouldnt be a whole lot more difficult if it doesnt need to be.....some parts of Ubuntu are way easier, like downloading programs from the repository....IF you dont have to add repositories. That took some getting used to.....but actually getting stuff to work shoudnt require borrowing a friends computer just to go online and ask the hackers how to fix it with the command line.


I have not tired mint yet, but when I hear that it is 'What Ubuntu should have been" that sounds really promising to me.

I am not a complete noob anymore, but still...I would like to stick it to the man and promote free egalitarian alternatives to corporate domination. lol. But seriously, **** windows and their data mining projects. Mac is ok, but I dont have that kind of money.


And please dont take my criticisms the wrong way....Ubuntu is powerful and more user friendly than some others, but this reluctance to spoon feed users out of the box is exactly what Ubuntu has possibly failed their mission statement and become just another linux for geeks....maybe one of the best ones out there, but its not even close to being for everyone.

To all the geeks out there...would you really be that bummed if your OS just worked perfectly right out of the box? Would you feel cheated out of an afternoon of tinkering if you didnt encounter a problem, or have to learn something by fixing it? Would an OS that works out of the box insult your great intelligence?

I dont think most here are that elitist, but sometimes I think a few people are.

Nick_Jinn
May 15th, 2010, 05:16 AM
But what I do want to say is that the use of the command line could be a geek-land, but will give you definetely the power to accomplish things otherwise impossibles with just clicks

I dont think that the command line should be removed. However, you shouldnt NEED the command line to do really basic stuff that any other proprietary OS would instantly do out of the box.

Its possible to appeal to the high end users AND the noobs....there is no contradiction there if you cater to both. They both fall under the umbrella of "everybody". lol.

But if you cant even get online sometimes because your wireless card is proprietary, unless you get help from the geeks, that is definitely not for the noobs, and therefor not for 'everyone' which was specifically the mission statement of Ubuntu Philosophy.

I myself am interested in learning to go a little deeper, but what if I want to send used computer off to my mom? She cant figure out how to deal with viruses (A plus to linux) but will basic web browsing and web cams and MP3 support work ok without her having to go online? Just registering for a site is sometimes beyond her level of patience, let alone waiting for step by step instructions.



Good thing this place exists! The community is possibly the best thing about this place....but I would like some of the geeks to be a little more sympathetic to non-geeks. Get rid of the elitist attitude, because while that is historically what linux is all about, that isnt what Ubuntu specifically was supposed to be about.


I dont know if Mint fixes this or not....I hope so. I would like to try it. I like Ubuntu, but more user friendly would be better.

To be it seems like a little more than just Ubuntu with different packages included. Some things about Mint do seem different enough to justify the separation....but its close enough to Ubuntu that hopefully I will already know my way around.


I will let you know what I think after I try it.

oldsoundguy
May 15th, 2010, 06:35 AM
NO... repeating ... NO ... operating system will make the sites you visit on line easier to use vs another system

ON LINE IS ON LINE .. browser is what you use and the OS (other than it's protection or lack thereof) will not CHANGE site content.

But the OS is one of the bricks that DO make a difference in your on line SPEED (but just a small part of it.) The browser is another brick. Your computer is another brick, your provider is another brick.

Why some people expect a stone miracle just by changing the operating systems is beyond me.

Having sad all that .. Lucid is the best experience I have ever had using Linux and I have been using it since Mandrake 4.

But I don't have it on some piece of junk 6 year old laptop .. but I DO have it on some 6 year old DESKTOPS and, with the exception of some third party RESTRICTED programs .. it has been flawless.

And, as far as I can tell, even easier than OSX to learn now.

No, it will NOT hold your hand WHILE you are installing .. but the user guides are pretty thorough and the use of the terminal (CLI in Linux .. Command Prompt in Windows) really is NOT needed until you want to CHANGE and customize .. IF YOU WANT TO .. otherwise it works out of the box for most (that is MOST) general users for most of their needs.

Nick_Jinn
May 15th, 2010, 08:18 AM
NO... repeating ... NO ... operating system will make the sites you visit on line easier to use vs another system.


Are you serious?! Well, it is Friday night.

You dont think that lack of proprietary drivers and codecs will make it any harder just to get online for a novice, or more difficult to perform online functions like watching a video on youtube or listening to MP3s?

Of course you can 'make' Ubuntu do these things, but I think your argument is a little weak. If just getting online is a bigger hassle, then no, every OS is NOT just as easy to use for these functions.



ON LINE IS ON LINE .. browser is what you use and the OS (other than it's protection or lack thereof) will not CHANGE site content.


Uhhh...did anyone suggest that by changing your OS you will be changing another websites web content?

If you dont have flash or support for your video card then it WILL change your online experience. More importantly, if you have trouble getting online to begin with, then its also going to change what shows up when you open firefox.


Why some people expect a stone miracle just by changing the operating systems is beyond me.

And what miracle would that be? That basic functions would be ready to go right out of the box without much or any tinkering?


But I don't have it on some piece of junk 6 year old laptop .

Thank you for sharing. How exactly is this statement relevant?

I am not talking about performance here. I am talking about how much tinkering and customization is involved, and whether its too much for people who can barely handle windows.....which is a huge segment of the population.


And, as far as I can tell, even easier than OSX to learn now.

I am not so sure about that. The programs themselves, and the basic interface is a little quirky with OSX....definite learning curve, but you are not trying to hack your system just to get it working...at least not so much.



but the user guides are pretty thorough and the use of the terminal (CLI in Linux .. Command Prompt in Windows) really is NOT needed until you want to CHANGE and customize .. IF YOU WANT TO .. otherwise it works out of the box for most (that is MOST) general users for most of their needs.

See above. You should not need to read a book before getting the basics to work....Firefox, messenger, webcam, wireless cards, driver support, DVD and MP3 codecs......Yes, you can do all of these things on Ubuntu, but its still intimidating enough for the novice that people will give up and go right back to windows. And yes, its totally doable to learn everything you need from the books, but thats for people who see this as a hobby like learning a new language...and lot of people do not see this as a hobby. Its support to just do its job.....turn on the computer, connect to the internet, open up open office and do your report, print it out, use messenger to talk to your friends, edit your pictures and videos, keep a calendar of events.....it should be relatively simple without any research. It shouldnt require hours of customization.

But Ubuntu does not really work out of the box for "most" users.

I can get my Ubuntu set up how I want it in a few hours, but a lot of people cant.

The restricted drivers addon is a step in the right direction, but if there was a feature that advanced users could turn off that would walk people through some of this....yes, holding their hand, Ubuntu would be more than sufficient for average Joe American.

Ubuntu can do almost anything thats needed. There are a few gaps to cover....like people want to use their webcam in yahoo with pidgin....but for the most part, there isnt a whole lot that Ubuntu cant do that your average joe needs.....whats missing is that it doesnt hold your hand.


I think whats needed is getting over the purely open source model....make it optional for people who have need of a purely open source yet functional OS as the foundation, but dont make people have to do anything too crazy when they are just getting their feet wet....something that simple makes a gigantic difference to a noob.

If the open source program is there, use that as a preference. If not, then dont leave people hanging or make them work harder to add it themselves.


I think an interactive tutorial is what would really make Ubuntu the OS for everyone.....people dont want to read a hundred page manual....but they will watch some cute talking animation on a screen, and tips that come in sound bites.....and you can turn it off. Just having it as an option should not detract from anyone who is a power user.

Dayofswords
May 15th, 2010, 08:22 AM
Easy:
Linux Mint
PC Linux OS
Puppy


Intermediate:
Ubuntu
Fedora
openSUSE
Mandriva

Expert:
Gentoo
Slackware
Debian

...I know everyone will disagree, but when talking to user(s) who've never heard of a Linux distro, the above is kinda' how I approach it....

then there is mega expert: Linux from scratch

swoll1980
May 15th, 2010, 08:27 AM
To me, Mint is just Ubuntu that I have to wait an extra month for. I don't care for the slab menu, I don't like green, and the codecs aren't a problem.

Nick_Jinn
May 15th, 2010, 09:01 AM
To me, Mint is just Ubuntu that I have to wait an extra month for. I don't care for the slab menu, I don't like green, and the codecs aren't a problem.


I am going to suspend judgment until I try it.

I would imagine that most people who play with Ubuntu long enough, who enjoy tinkering, probably have less of a need for what mint has to offer. Its not like Ubuntu cant do everything mint can.


One thing I noticed though is that in Mint programs are rated again.....Didnt Ubuntu used to do this? Then they threw out that program and replaced it with the current one? I kind of miss the user ratings, and dont really like how you have to visit a different page to read the description.....though I do like how seamlessly they download when you have several going.

smellyman
May 15th, 2010, 09:25 AM
all OS's need tinkering. Flash, codecs (divx etc), drivers, more software.....etc

Ubuntu go to package manager and restricted extras and bam, you're done (pretty much)

Windows needs that too, except you have to search the web find what you need, hope for no malware and install away.

Linux makes it MUCH easier.

23dornot23d
May 15th, 2010, 10:22 AM
I have just installed Mint 9 .... and must admit ,,,,, was not disappointed with the easy way it installs ,,,,,,

First time install and all works well ..... graphic driver installed with no problems and am currently

just adding extra 3D programs to it .... and as said prior to this all the codecs seem to be already there

for video etc ..... and flash ... cannot knock it ....... picks up grub 2 and upgrades it ok too .....

I have been a little worried about what happens if the different Distros are using different versions ...

I only have one problem which I had with Ubuntu too ...... it will not pick up Mandriva to run properly from Grub 2.

This I have to run by swapping boot devices in the BIOS .....seems really strange that it will not work from

the Grub 2 update ...... I am sure that with time this will have a solution too though ........

Nick_Jinn
May 15th, 2010, 10:33 AM
all OS's need tinkering. Flash, codecs (divx etc), drivers, more software.....etc

Windows needs that too, except you have to search the web find what you need, hope for no malware and install away.


Not so much for basic out of the box tasks. The hardware that your system comes with will not need you to go searching for drivers. For most laptops, automatic updates will give you every driver you need, and in windows 7 its even easier.


Now in regard to getting drivers for new hardware....Yes, I agree totally. In that regard ubuntu makes it easy. Ubuntu gives automatic updates like ease of installation to new hardware that would not normally be covered. Finding programs from a single repository is WAY easier than having to go online to search for and download them then execute them and be walked through the installation....lame.

Yes, for that Ubuntu kicks windows ***.....but you might be missing something. For a geek, this make linux WAY easier and more efficient...even for a moderate initiate, its arguably overall easier despite the hiccups.

However, there are certain places where linux users get stumped when they are fist starting out, and these are actually difficult for noobs to overcome, while the problems with windows are just tedious and time consuming or annoying....Do I want to start now or be asked again in 5 minutes or you will stop everything I am doing? Where is the option to stop ****ing asking me Microsoft? I guess 7 is a little better without tweaking, but yeah, windows sucks.


I prefer Ubuntu to windows, but I think Ubuntu needs to hold peoples hands more....not just in the community, but in how the basics operate....dont think of making it easy for linux veterans...think of the people coming from windows who have never seen anything but windows and want something they can figure out in minutes just by looking at it.


Ubuntu go to package manager and restricted extras and bam, you're done (pretty much)

Not really. It might seem that easy if you know your way around linux...you can get good at customizing your laptop so that it seems that easy, easier than windows, but for noobs just coming from windows they usually dont feel the same way.

There is all kinds of basic basic problems that require you to use the command line....most windows users dont use Bash and they dont want to start using the terminal when they get to linux....arguments in favor of the command line, speed and efficiency and freedom, they are all irrelevant. That isnt what people want.



I think this girl speaks some wisdom in her suggestions.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49yPxmB98hI&feature=channel

Nick_Jinn
May 15th, 2010, 10:48 AM
Please check this out.....

No doubt, this girl is a dumbass. Open office works perfectly, and YOU DONT PUT A WINDOWS DISK IN YOUR UBUNTU LAPTOP TO INSTALL THE WIRELESS DRIVERS. lol

Its hilarious how ignorant she was, and the reporter at the end has to clear some of this up....but I think this is a perfect illustration of how geeks think this is so easy and nice, but to this college dropout it was anything but.

In reality, this is exactly how most people react the first time they try to use Ubuntu...and the sooner the geeks realize this the sooner Ubuntu can finally become a serious competitor.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Qj8p-PEwbI&feature=related


Its good for a laugh though. I love it when she tries to put the verizon disk in her laptop....I guess I am doing it to now, though I am lower on the totem poll, but she is the kind of person who linux needs to think about when they are making an OS for the masses....how about a pop up window gently telling her to stop what she is doing and use the software center?

XubuRoxMySox
May 15th, 2010, 11:37 AM
I would say the various flavors of PCLOS are champs. Almost everything need to run a computer out of the box is pre-installed, Windows style control center called PC Control Center and of course what else? Synaptic. You can even forget its an RPM-based distro. Just install it and forget it!

+1 If it works on your hardware. That's one of the reasons, perhaps, that there are over 300 different Linux distributions. PCLinuxOS looks awesome but for some reason on my poor old hand-me-down Dell, even the LXDE version balks and freezes and becomes a jumbled, unrecognizable visual frenzy. And the only way LXDE worked well on Ubuntu was when it was installed on top of Gnome.

Yet on my big brother's computer, PCLinuxOS is flawless, fast, versatile, powerful, and perfect.

Debian/Ubuntu/Mint seem to be better suited for certain hardware while Slackware + derivatives work best on others and Red Hat + derivatives work best on others. I wish there was a universal hardware compatibility chart someplace (maybe Distrowatch could publish it) where distros could be listed by how well they run on this kind of 'puter or that kind.

It has taken me over a year of trial and error to discover that Ubuntu suits my hardware best, and that Xfce suits my tastes best.

Your mileage may vary,
Robin

quinnten83
May 15th, 2010, 11:42 AM
I love Ubuntu. I have not really been impressed with any other distro I have tried except maybe Suse. Ubuntu has been pretty cool....but buggy sometimes....and not always that user friendly for non geeks. The amount of trouble shooting and even hardware problems....like seriously messing up the format on your MP3 player despite just using it as an external hard drive for example....its been challenging.


So how do you feel about mint users? Do you feel like they are an extended part of your own community? Turn coats maybe? Competition? Basically similar besides a few minor tweaks?


If you like mint, what does it have to offer that Ubuntu doesnt? Perhaps a little easier without having to **** with the command line? Command line really is the doman of geeks, for the most part....unless you make it simple with saved commands in a visual interface.


It is generally a little behind Ubuntu in some ways? A little ahead in others?


I really could not possibly care less about avoiding proproetary software or even breaking any laws.....just as long as it works and works really easily without having to tweak my computer as a hobby. I dont enjoy hacking my computer just to get it to work, but I also want something free, cheaper than a mac and more stable with less viruses than windows, and I dont want to feel like my OS is data mining for the corporations or government....so windows is out and Macs are expensive. Linux seems like the right choice, but I dislike a lot of the distros and Ubuntu isnt really as geared for the masses as I hoped it was....but maybe its getting better?

Does it sound like I would link mint?


One advantage Ubuntu seems to have is this community forum. Great stuff.....is Mint similar enough that I could get help right here in the Ubuntu forums?

regarding your content, just for a laugh, reinstall Windows on your computer. See how user-friendly that is an no tweaking requires. Come back and tell us about it here.

I haven't really used Mint. I ran it a couple of times from the Live-CD. I liked it. If it's compatible with the Ubuntu repo's, than I might install it sometime. Also I don't think Ubuntu, and especially the new one, requires that much tweaking, granted, I've encountered a few annoyances, but on the whole, very friendly in use.

quinnten83
May 15th, 2010, 11:50 AM
It will be a sad day when people look down on others for using other distros. It's bad enough when people moan about Windows.

<start rant>
Winblows sucks @$$, and M$ is evil.
People moan about Windows because they don't get the value for their money they were expecting. Just listen to the people that don't realize there are alternatives how much they moan and beaaach about "the computer being slow".
Pretending that they don't do bad crap, makes you pretty much just as bad as those fanatics that bash Windows at every opportunity.
<end rant>

We no return to our regularly scheduled forum post....

Nightstrike2009
May 15th, 2010, 04:39 PM
I've used Mint before I quite liked it but its really just Ubuntu but made a bit easier if you put a bit of effort into learning how to do the same with Ubuntu it pays off, knowledge is power and all that.

That said if it suits your needs use it, your still one of the Ubuntu family my friend. :-)

In answer to quinnten83 actually I should thank windows my friend as it drove me to using Linux and I've never looked back since (My PC doesn't crash as much either) LMAO. ;-)

swoll1980
May 15th, 2010, 05:05 PM
Please check this out.....

No doubt, this girl is a dumbass. Open office works perfectly, and YOU DONT PUT A WINDOWS DISK IN YOUR UBUNTU LAPTOP TO INSTALL THE WIRELESS DRIVERS. lol


Open office doesn't work perfectly, and I've had to put Windows's driver CDs in my Ubuntu laptop before to install wireless drivers.

WinterRain
May 15th, 2010, 05:15 PM
To me, Mint is just Ubuntu that I have to wait an extra month for. I don't care for the slab menu, I don't like green, and the codecs aren't a problem.

+1

Mint doesn't offer me anything worthwhile.

malspa
May 15th, 2010, 05:29 PM
So how do you feel about mint users? Do you feel like they are an extended part of your own community? Turn coats maybe? Competition?

LOL! Turn-coats? That's funny. But I do think that Mint users are, or should be, part of the Ubuntu community. I don't think of Mint as competition for Ubuntu.



is Mint similar enough that I could get help right here in the Ubuntu forums?

Yes, it is. I use the Ubuntu forums and documentations to deal with Mint issues.


I normally have had both Ubuntu and Mint on the same computer. Mint seems to be quicker and easier to install. Otherwise, I really have no preference between Ubuntu and Mint. One is pretty much as good as the other, as far as I'm concerned.

oldsoundguy
May 15th, 2010, 06:15 PM
But they also have their own forum and the link to it along with the link to the software portal (their version of the store) will appear in the top bar of your browser if you use Firefox.

Nick_Jinn
May 17th, 2010, 12:13 PM
regarding your content, just for a laugh, reinstall Windows on your computer. See how user-friendly that is an no tweaking requires. Come back and tell us about it here.


I have reinstalled windows hundreds of times. Right now I am at the point where I can get Ubuntu up and running faster than I can get windows up and running to my specifications.....but just because its quick and easy once you understand it does not mean that the learning curve isnt steeper.

For windows I either use a laptop disk that takes care of all the drivers and proprietary software issues OR I used a pirated driver search program that installs them all for you...This is the best way to deal with it in windows....normally they would want to charge you though. In Ubuntu the same service is free and even automatic.

Its not that Ubuntu isnt awesome and efficient....its just that the learning curve is steeper for the brand brand new users.




<start rant>
Winblows sucks @$$, and M$ is evil.
People moan about Windows because they don't get the value for their money they were expecting. Just listen to the people that don't realize there are alternatives how much they moan and beaaach about "the computer being slow".
Pretending that they don't do bad crap, makes you pretty much just as bad as those fanatics that bash Windows at every opportunity.
<end rant>

We no return to our regularly scheduled forum post....


I agree totally. Bitching abotu Microsoft is totally different from bitching about a different free linux distro. One is about petty rivalry, or perhaps ego....putting down users who need their hand held by a friendlier OS, suggesting that they go back to supporting a horrible corporation like Microsoft rather than expect a more user friendly linux....While bitching about Microsoft is a real issue as their actions are directly oppressing us in some ways.

In my opinion, Microsoft is not just another product, a choice between inefficient GUI for the lazy person or highly efficient hacker based systems for computer geeks....thats not the dichotomy I see. I see a mega-corporation attempting to limit and control us, spy on us, attempt to artificially create a defacto monopoly, give governments and corporations tools for data mining....There are definitely some moral and ethical issues that come up when it comes to supporting Microsoft.


I like that there are some alternatives for non-geeks that are not microsoft....no, they are not slackware or some other highly esoteric system, and yeah they might be full of noobs who ask dumb questions, and yeah they might have demands that are out of line with what linux has historically been about, but in my opinion getting as many people to use open source software as possible is ultimately in our best interest and in our children's best interest. I dont feel like I am exaggerating this. Getting people to shift to open source, even if they are not hackers or geeks, will have positive ramifications for our future and the future of technology and information exchange. It cold make the difference between what kind of society we end up living in.

Then again, some people feel differently, and its just another operating system....a matter of choice or a hobby....but for me, I want people to use something that isnt microsoft, and a linux distro that is feature rich and polished with a very shallow introductory learning curve is exactly what we need for that.



Still, I wouldnt bring up microsoft unless it was on topic. After a while it gets redundant, especially when its OT.

Nick_Jinn
May 17th, 2010, 12:21 PM
+1

Mint doesn't offer me anything worthwhile.


Why do you feel this way?

Mint can offer you anything Ubuntu can. If you can hack Ubuntu to customize it how you want to, you can hack Mint to be just like Ubuntu....I mean, you can get rid of the start menus and install the Ubuntu version...like really easily. You can change the color theme. You can uninstall the proprietary drivers, though Ihave no idea why unless you are selling computers or creating your own distro. The software center is a little different but synaptic is the same. I bet you could get Ubuntus software center onto mint if you wanted it.


If you like Ubuntu then why wouldnt you also like mint? Its basically the same operating system only with some minor tweaks that you can reverse through customization.


You mean that Mint doesnt bring anything to new the table that you personally had use for, or do you mean that you would walk away from the mint computer and drive a mile downt he road to use the Ubuntu one out of preference? That wouldnt make any sense as it is essentially the same OS.


Mint is better for novices. If you already know your way around Ubuntu, there isnt a great reason to switch really, unless you want to use one of the community projects like fluxbox, but its basically a version of Ubuntu that you can give to your mom or grandmother that works for them out of the box without confusing them. You dont sacrifice any of the functionality and you can customize it back to being Ubuntu more or less....If you are too lazy to change the start menu and color theme then its not much different from being too lazy to install medibuntu.


But I agree that it doesnt bring a lot new to the table for experienced power users, at least in the main release.

e-Gee
May 17th, 2010, 12:25 PM
Mint have all the same bugs as Ubuntu, but Linux Mint comes out one month after Ubuntu and till that time some bugs are fixed by ubuntu developers and community, that is why it seems that Linux Mint have less bugs then Ubuntu but they are the same.

Nick_Jinn
May 17th, 2010, 12:34 PM
My girlfriend was scared of Linux. I always used Ubuntu, but since putting Mint on her laptop she likes it better than windows and needs less help than when I installed Ubuntu.

oldsoundguy
May 17th, 2010, 05:21 PM
As has been pointed out in several round about ways, Mint usually just works out of the box with no tweaking, requires no terminal work unless you want to change some of the defaults (for someone with experience), is quickly learned and easy to use for a newb AND is a great entry level Linux build for granny, your girlfriend, a 6 year old kid and the computer at the Senior Citizens home. Since it IS Ubuntu/Linux based, it won't crash and you won't forever be trying to clean it up and keep it "protected".

Yes, there are limitations. But, the more advanced Linux user is NOT the target audience of Mint.

beetleman64
May 17th, 2010, 05:45 PM
I haven't used Mint for over a year, but I found it to be remarkably similar, despite some differences. To be honest, if I couldn't use Ubuntu I would probably turn to Mint or perhaps OpenSUSE.

XubuRoxMySox
May 17th, 2010, 08:06 PM
The software center is a little different but synaptic is the same.

While I agree with almost everything in your post, this one point is mistaken. Synaptic is "crippled" in Mint (to borrow one of their users' expression, used in their forum). It is designed to send users to the Mint Updater rather than using Synaptic to upgrade software.

That is generally safer for newbies, however. A quick count of all the "b0rked after update" threads here on UF is all it takes to see the value of updating Mint's way, where you can choose only "Mint-tested and Mint-approved" updates. But for users with a little more experience and willingness to handle whatever few problems may be created by an update, it's nice to have the option to "Mark All Upgrades" and install them.

Unless I am installing Linux for them, I generally point complete novices to Linux Mint rather than to Ubuntu though, because of that added layer of safety and the reduced likelihood of some update b0rking a working system.

If I were a Mint user (or a Mepis user, or a PCLinuxOS user, or a user of any other one-man-show distro) with some experience, I think I might worry - or at least wonder - about future support for the distro if the one single person who "develops" and maintains the distro should quit doing so for any reason. One of the nice things about the corporate or community sponsored distros like Fedora, Ubuntu, Debian, Mandriva, etc is that they don't depend too much on a single individual who may or may not even be here tomorrow. That, to me, is too important a factor for me to consider Mint or the other one-man-show distros as a long-term main OS.

In for the long term,
Robin

alket
May 17th, 2010, 08:37 PM
MINT (Mint Is Noobs Tittle)

oldsoundguy
May 17th, 2010, 09:07 PM
This is turning into a dispute between those that want to preserve their geekdom and those that welcome new Linux users OF ANY KIND.

Whatever the entry level system .. it is just THAT, an entry level system.

(For the geeks that were born knowing everything, guess that does not apply!)

Think on this:
The more LINUX users (regardless of the build) the more HARDWARE people will pay attention and develop drivers that WORK.
The more LINUX users (regardless of the build) the more attractive it will be for game designers to port their games to the system.
The more LINUX users (regardless of the build) the more third party developers will consider designing and porting their programs FOR LINUX.

Newbie Linux users = a better deal for all.
So HELP, don't hinder!

malspa
May 18th, 2010, 05:57 AM
the more advanced Linux user is NOT the target audience of Mint

True, but some advanced users like Mint simply because it's quick and easy to install. Sometimes you just want to get the installation done and get right to work. Sometimes Linux users who have been around for awhile just want to use the best tool for the job, and sometimes that's Linux Mint.


While I agree with almost everything in your post, this one point is mistaken. Synaptic is "crippled" in Mint (to borrow one of their users' expression, used in their forum). It is designed to send users to the Mint Updater rather than using Synaptic to upgrade software.

I'm one of those who considers Synaptic in recent Mint versions to be "crippled." I don't agree with removing the "Mark All Upgrades" option. Not a major issue for me, though.


If I were a Mint user (or a Mepis user, or a PCLinuxOS user, or a user of any other one-man-show distro) with some experience, I think I might worry - or at least wonder - about future support for the distro if the one single person who "develops" and maintains the distro should quit doing so for any reason. One of the nice things about the corporate or community sponsored distros like Fedora, Ubuntu, Debian, Mandriva, etc is that they don't depend too much on a single individual who may or may not even be here tomorrow. That, to me, is too important a factor for me to consider Mint or the other one-man-show distros as a long-term main OS.

If you are a Linux user instead of a "Mint user" or a "Mepis user" or a "PCLOS user," then you really don't have to worry much about this kind of thing. I always have at least two distros installed, and I've been using Mepis, Mint, and PCLOS (along with Debian and Ubuntu) for some years now; I'm never worried or even the least bit concerned about what will happen if Warren, Clem, or Tex can't continue with their respective distros. It really won't affect me much at all -- I'll just slide another distro in there and keep on working.

Even if I wasn't a dual-booter or multi-booter, if something ever happened to one of those guys, there would be plenty of time to move over to another distro, and no need for panic. The dev could be gone tomorrow, but that doesn't mean that the distro is just gonna crumble and collapse like a sandcastle that very same day.

In the case of Mepis, Warren could quit today and I could still be fine using Mepis a year from now. Same with Linux Mint.

Old Marcus
May 18th, 2010, 06:23 AM
I consider myself intermediate when it comes to Linux experience, and I much prefer Mint to Ubuntu. Not to say they are completely different, but due to it's later arrival, and custom software, I find the OS works out of the box more efficiently, allowing me to just get on with work. When I want to tweak the OS I can, that's the beauty of Linux. But when I don't, I don't have to, that's the beauty of Mint.

oldsoundguy
May 18th, 2010, 06:47 AM
I have mint on an old and slow 466 celeron with 512 ram and a 40gb hd. LOVE to have my friends A/B it on my wireless net with their "hotshot" Windows laptops. 9 out of 10 I can get to a web page on that one before they can!

And it completely blows them away when we a do a cold boot and I am ON THE WEB PAGE before they can even open a browser.

No, Mint is not all that bad .. in fact, it is pretty darn good and getting better.
Just that I am used to more control for my main machines. BUT I DO recommend it to those that want to try Linux out as it is a really GOOD door opener and eye opener!

Nick_Jinn
May 18th, 2010, 02:05 PM
This is turning into a dispute between those that want to preserve their geekdom and those that welcome new Linux users OF ANY KIND.

Whatever the entry level system .. it is just THAT, an entry level system.

(For the geeks that were born knowing everything, guess that does not apply!)

Think on this:
The more LINUX users (regardless of the build) the more HARDWARE people will pay attention and develop drivers that WORK.
The more LINUX users (regardless of the build) the more attractive it will be for game designers to port their games to the system.
The more LINUX users (regardless of the build) the more third party developers will consider designing and porting their programs FOR LINUX.

Newbie Linux users = a better deal for all.
So HELP, don't hinder!


Everyone should listen to this guy. He has some wisdom.

Also, its not like Mint is lacking anything major that would hinder the power users. If you are really that good, then you should be able to customize mint back into being Ubuntu again.


But the Mint project depends on Ubuntu and Ubuntu has been a major source of innovation. Ubuntu is awesome....I think that mint had to take over in creating a distro for the windows noobs because Ubuntu's principles are preventing really useful pre-installation stuff that makes the transition that much easier for newcomers...and the restricted drivers and even medibuntu doesnt address the sum total of the better changes....but really its Ubuntu that is leading the way to help Linux compete with windows.

Nick_Jinn
May 18th, 2010, 02:15 PM
While I agree with almost everything in your post, this one point is mistaken. Synaptic is "crippled" in Mint (to borrow one of their users' expression, used in their forum). It is designed to send users to the Mint Updater rather than using Synaptic to upgrade software.

That is generally safer for newbies, however. A quick count of all the "b0rked after update" threads here on UF is all it takes to see the value of updating Mint's way, where you can choose only "Mint-tested and Mint-approved" updates. But for users with a little more experience and willingness to handle whatever few problems may be created by an update, it's nice to have the option to "Mark All Upgrades" and install them.

Unless I am installing Linux for them, I generally point complete novices to Linux Mint rather than to Ubuntu though, because of that added layer of safety and the reduced likelihood of some update b0rking a working system.

If I were a Mint user (or a Mepis user, or a PCLinuxOS user, or a user of any other one-man-show distro) with some experience, I think I might worry - or at least wonder - about future support for the distro if the one single person who "develops" and maintains the distro should quit doing so for any reason. One of the nice things about the corporate or community sponsored distros like Fedora, Ubuntu, Debian, Mandriva, etc is that they don't depend too much on a single individual who may or may not even be here tomorrow. That, to me, is too important a factor for me to consider Mint or the other one-man-show distros as a long-term main OS.

In for the long term,
Robin


Thank you for educating me on this issue. I didnt know that.

Right now I am reading "Ubuntu Unleashed" and am about to start learning Python. I may come back to Ubuntu in 6 months to a year, but I am getting my family hooked on linux via Mint.

Can you hack mint to bring back the Ubuntu Synaptic?

fluxlizard
May 18th, 2010, 02:15 PM
I started using mint a couple of releases ago. I've been using linux for almost a decade now. I like mint because I don't have to go down the checklist of stuff to install after installing ubuntu. It's ready to go. I also like it because it seems more stable. One thing I dislike about ubuntu is the same machine may work flawlessly one release, and then become buggy somehow the next. Actually it isn't the machine, it's the release. I haven't experienced that with mint yet.

The other thing I like about mint is that it is ubuntu under the hood. I can install any deb that is for ubuntu, I can solve any problem using ubuntu forums. I really can't understand the ubuntu users who are saying mint takes away their control. It's linux. The control is always there.

malspa
May 18th, 2010, 02:54 PM
Can you hack mint to bring back the Ubuntu Synaptic?

Yes, there is a hack to put the "Mark All Upgrades" back in Mint's Synaptic, if you need it. I had to ask around to find out how to do it. In the end, it doesn't matter much to me because I rarely use the option anyway. I just didn't like that it was taken away with no easy option to put it back.

dnguyen1963
May 18th, 2010, 09:33 PM
Hi,

You certainly can, Mint even has its own forums, and most things work straight off, I'm a Mint user and have never looked elsewhere.

Regards, Ellgor.

Sorry...tried Mint and got the black screen of death during the live CD test.

Old Marcus
May 19th, 2010, 12:27 AM
Sorry...tried Mint and got the black screen of death during the live CD test.

And that obviously reflects the experience of everyone in the world. :P

dnguyen1963
May 19th, 2010, 02:23 AM
And that obviously reflects the experience of everyone in the world. :P

Yup!

MCVenom
May 19th, 2010, 03:23 AM
While we sit here discussing whether or not we consider Mint part of the family, I would like to point out that I don't think I've seen anything particularly disparaging of Mint.

I'd also like to point out that right now in the Mint Forums, they are talking about how Mint should move to a Debian base, Ubuntu just ain't good enough.

...

Turn coats :p

ubunterooster
May 19th, 2010, 04:11 AM
That makes sense actually.

Shining Arcanine
May 19th, 2010, 04:25 AM
Hmm, Ubuntu isn't really the easiest Linux. That crown belongs to Puppy Linux, with Mandriva second. Ubuntu is kinda intermediate and that may be why it is popular - it doesn't spoon feed users too much.

The author of the following image would disagree:

http://img195.imageshack.us/img195/8666/ogaaanrrdglkx5hfdcn3slk.jpg


Hi,

You certainly can, Mint even has its own forums, and most things work straight off, I'm a Mint user and have never looked elsewhere.

Regards, Ellgor.

I think that day came a long time ago.

Nick_Jinn
May 19th, 2010, 08:37 AM
The author of the following image would disagree

The author sounds like a ********. Ubuntu is moderate. Its not the easiest and its not the hardest. It might be towards the easy side (for linux) but towards the more difficult side (of OSs that are used by more than 2% of the population). Its hard enough to chase some noobs away and its easy enough that some people (who probably dont have lives outside of being computer geeks and need something to pride themselves on) can feel superior by bragging about how they use a more difficult OS.....but trust me....women are not impressed, for the most part. You will probably get farther by appearing to be helpful and kind, rather than a snarky computer nerd....unless you are rich, then maybe you can get away with it.


People need to realize that even people who use lindos/linspire were helping to further open source just by increasing the number of users that hardware developers need to think about when they are writing drivers....as well as software developers.....You will never catch me using lindos, and I would encourage them to try something different, but we dont need to attack them or make them feel unwelcome.

I think lindows is an easier target though, as they charge and its somewhat of a scam. Mint is at least still Ubuntu if you are skilled enough to customize it.

5dolla
May 19th, 2010, 09:42 AM
mint just dosent offer enough difference imo to Merritt a switch from Ubuntu....

Nick_Jinn
May 19th, 2010, 11:07 AM
mint just dosent offer enough difference imo to Merritt a switch from Ubuntu....


I dont think that is the point. I dont think people graduate from Mint to Ubuntu, for the most part. I think people who are noobs and might have trouble with Ubuntu would be better off starting with Mint because its easier....if those little tweaks that make it easier are not important to you, then there might not be a great need to switch....However there are some features that advanced users can appreciate, from what little I have gathered.....

Fluxbox....Mint has this and Ubuntu doesnt, and it still has Ubuntu under the hood.

Reduced set up time....yeah, you CAN make those tweaks yourself with every installation, but what if you have OTHER hobbies and really just want it to work, and fast? Just because you choose to have more of it done for you does not automatically mean you are an idiot or cant do it yourself.....but then again, some people really do need the help. Either way, its nice when its already there before you even need it.

Mint has the advantage of having time to make security tweaks before the release, though you have to wait an extra month.



Mint might do a better job retaining windows refugees than Ubuntu does. Ubuntu loses a lot of people in the first days/weeks of installation. Mint loses fewer because there is less trouble shooting for the noobs.

nerdtron
May 19th, 2010, 11:20 AM
I love Ubuntu. I have not really been impressed with any other distro I have tried except maybe Suse. Ubuntu has been pretty cool....but buggy sometimes....and not always that user friendly for non geeks. The amount of trouble shooting and even hardware problems....like seriously messing up the format on your MP3 player despite just using it as an external hard drive for example....its been challenging.


So how do you feel about mint users? Do you feel like they are an extended part of your own community? Turn coats maybe? Competition? Basically similar besides a few minor tweaks?


I really could not possibly care less about avoiding proproetary software or even breaking any laws.....just as long as it works and works really easily without having to tweak my computer as a hobby.
Does it sound like I would link mint?


One advantage Ubuntu seems to have is this community forum. Great stuff.....is Mint similar enough that I could get help right here in the Ubuntu forums?

Those nifty little extras and modification really make Mint 'yummier' than Ubuntu. Mint also has a forum like this. The proprietary codecs preinstalled gives it a good impression for newbies since MP3s play by default. The interface is also similar to XP which adds up to why it's good for new linux users.
I'm using Mint and I find it more polished than ubuntu. Besides, the default 'dark and green' theme is easier on the eyes than ubuntu's 'dark, purple or orange'. :)

ubunterooster
May 19th, 2010, 12:16 PM
Fluxbox....Mint has this and Ubuntu doesnt, ...by default you can't use fluxbox on it but you can get it, in place of or beside gnome

malspa
May 19th, 2010, 07:24 PM
People need to realize that even people who use lindos/linspire were helping to further open source just by increasing the number of users that hardware developers need to think about when they are writing drivers....as well as software developers.....You will never catch me using lindos, and I would encourage them to try something different, but we dont need to attack them or make them feel unwelcome.

I think lindows is an easier target though, as they charge and its somewhat of a scam. Mint is at least still Ubuntu if you are skilled enough to customize it.

I think they were forced by Microsoft to drop the "Lindows" name, so they became Linspire. And Linspire did seem like somewhat of a scam. I know because it was the first distro I really used.

You would never catch me using Linspire again either. But I don't think anyone uses it anymore, I think that distro is dead (someone can correct me if I'm wrong). Although I do still have some Linspire live CDs around here somewhere.

The good thing about Linspire is that it was Debian-based, and the distro itself was fairly solid. (I didn't care much for the company behind it, though.) After running it for awhile, it was clear to me that this Linux thing was going to work out for me. And I started looking into things and found other distros to try out.

Linspire was easy for me because it came pre-installed on a cheap computer, so it was a nice little intro to Linux.

I can see where Mint can be the same type of thing for a newbie. It usually installs quickly and easily. If a person later wants to move on to other distros, that's fine, but there are also some good reasons why a more experienced user might want to stay with Mint, IMHO.

Nick_Jinn
May 20th, 2010, 10:36 AM
I looks like Linspire failed and Xandros bought the rights to it.

http://linspire.com/


You know....back about 6-7 years ago when I first started using linux....I think I was playing around with Red Hat and Mandrake and getting very frustrated....I 'sort of' got Suse working but no the advanced functions. Anyway, I wasnt aware of using any repositories of programs like Ubuntu uses. Maybe it existed and I was just really dense? I wouldnt have known what to look for at the time, and they didt have really comprehensive web communities built into the front page like Mint or directed to from firefox when you open it for the first time....and I got to tell you....downloading and installing programs was a bitch! It was tough.

Ubuntu has come a long way. Downloading and installing programs in Ubuntu today with the installers that they added is 100x easier than it was before they added that feature, and trying to add programs on some of the older generations of linux was just impossible for a non-geek noob....yeah, you could learn, but the learning curve would be like taking college pre-calculus as middle schooler......pre-calculus has a steeper learning curve than calculus imho. It would be tough without a tutor. '

Unlike those earlier distros, modern forms of Ubuntu are actually more or less accessible to new users....to a point. The lack of drivers and lack of java, flash, DVD playback and MP3 support are all turn offs to new users. You can customize it, but its a major project with every new instllation, and around here thats every 6 months....Not everyone likes to sit and customize their computer as a hobby.


I think that the changes that mint made are the changes that Ubuntu should have made to be the distro for everyone....If experienced windows users are getting stumped, I bet a lot of people who live in poorer countries with less developed educational systems also hit some stumbling blocks.....and also consider that a lot of these people are not being fed Cable/DSL/Fios/4g an even their dialop is hit and miss.....they cant sit online for days at a time on their dialup connection and 533 mhrz computer with 128mb ram trying to download 4 days worth of updates before searching the forums to figure out how to install basic drivers that should have come with the system to begin with....its just not practical.

With Mint, you just plop your disk in and install it....you can even surf the web while its installing which is a really neat feature....and without going online first your computer already works. You can watch movies, listen to your music, your graphics card words......I think its great.

Today I got windows messenger Webcam to work with Gyache......Besides playing the very latest games, I am seeing less and less that windows has to offer which linux cant do better. That wasnt the case, at least at my level of knowledge, 10 years ago. Ubuntu is a big part of that, as is Open Suse and a few others, but I think Mint is about as user friendly as it gets in a totally free operating system that still puts you in control.



Where was I going with this? Oh, yeah. Back when there was a place for Lindos it was hard to install programs without knowing how to use the command line.....no anymore. Maybe its not '1 click' but I think I can get it in 3 to 4 clicks starting from my desktop. Start, software manager, enter program, check or read then check, apply. When its that easy there really isnt a market for a distro that charges you to install it for you.


I guess they did succeed in showing people that it can do everything windows can though. It wasnt all bad and it was still cheaper than paying for windows.

dnguyen1963
May 20th, 2010, 10:24 PM
I looks like Linspire failed and Xandros bought the rights to it.

http://linspire.com/


You know....back about 6-7 years ago when I first started using linux....I think I was playing around with Red Hat and Mandrake and getting very frustrated....I 'sort of' got Suse working but no the advanced functions. Anyway, I wasnt aware of using any repositories of programs like Ubuntu uses. Maybe it existed and I was just really dense? I wouldnt have known what to look for at the time, and they didt have really comprehensive web communities built into the front page like Mint or directed to from firefox when you open it for the first time....and I got to tell you....downloading and installing programs was a bitch! It was tough.

Ubuntu has come a long way. Downloading and installing programs in Ubuntu today with the installers that they added is 100x easier than it was before they added that feature, and trying to add programs on some of the older generations of linux was just impossible for a non-geek noob....yeah, you could learn, but the learning curve would be like taking college pre-calculus as middle schooler......pre-calculus has a steeper learning curve than calculus imho. It would be tough without a tutor. '

Unlike those earlier distros, modern forms of Ubuntu are actually more or less accessible to new users....to a point. The lack of drivers and lack of java, flash, DVD playback and MP3 support are all turn offs to new users. You can customize it, but its a major project with every new instllation, and around here thats every 6 months....Not everyone likes to sit and customize their computer as a hobby.


I think that the changes that mint made are the changes that Ubuntu should have made to be the distro for everyone....If experienced windows users are getting stumped, I bet a lot of people who live in poorer countries with less developed educational systems also hit some stumbling blocks.....and also consider that a lot of these people are not being fed Cable/DSL/Fios/4g an even their dialop is hit and miss.....they cant sit online for days at a time on their dialup connection and 533 mhrz computer with 128mb ram trying to download 4 days worth of updates before searching the forums to figure out how to install basic drivers that should have come with the system to begin with....its just not practical.

With Mint, you just plop your disk in and install it....you can even surf the web while its installing which is a really neat feature....and without going online first your computer already works. You can watch movies, listen to your music, your graphics card words......I think its great.

Today I got windows messenger Webcam to work with Gyache......Besides playing the very latest games, I am seeing less and less that windows has to offer which linux cant do better. That wasnt the case, at least at my level of knowledge, 10 years ago. Ubuntu is a big part of that, as is Open Suse and a few others, but I think Mint is about as user friendly as it gets in a totally free operating system that still puts you in control.



Where was I going with this? Oh, yeah. Back when there was a place for Lindos it was hard to install programs without knowing how to use the command line.....no anymore. Maybe its not '1 click' but I think I can get it in 3 to 4 clicks starting from my desktop. Start, software manager, enter program, check or read then check, apply. When its that easy there really isnt a market for a distro that charges you to install it for you.


I guess they did succeed in showing people that it can do everything windows can though. It wasnt all bad and it was still cheaper than paying for windows.

Boys...I wish I could have had such a good experience like yours with Mint. I could not even go pass the live CD stage. I really looked forward to giving Mint a try after experiencing so many freezes with 10.04 LTS.:(

Ebere
May 20th, 2010, 10:32 PM
Boys...I wish I could have had such a good experience like yours with Mint. I could not even go pass the live CD stage. I really looked forward to giving Mint a try after experiencing so many freezes with 10.04 LTS.:(

Details, please.

ubunterooster
May 20th, 2010, 11:14 PM
Boys...I wish I could have had such a good experience like yours with Mint. I could not even go pass the live CD stage. I really looked forward to giving Mint a try after experiencing so many freezes with 10.04 LTS.:(
http://www.easyfreesmileys.com/smileys/free-sad-smileys-324.gif

Try the liveUSB

Nick_Jinn
May 21st, 2010, 04:28 AM
Boys...I wish I could have had such a good experience like yours with Mint. I could not even go pass the live CD stage. I really looked forward to giving Mint a try after experiencing so many freezes with 10.04 LTS.:(

Did you use the right download? Did you use the OEM or whatever setting? Were you attempting to use a 64 bit version?


Try the 32 bit main version and not the OEM or whatever.

Try it on a different computer maybe. What are your specs?

WinterRain
May 21st, 2010, 06:02 AM
The lack of drivers and lack of java, flash, DVD playback and MP3 support (in ubuntu) are all turn offs to new users.

You mean like a fresh windows/mac install?

dnguyen1963
May 21st, 2010, 05:33 PM
http://www.easyfreesmileys.com/smileys/free-sad-smileys-324.gif

Try the liveUSB

I did not even get that far...pretty sure I downloaded the right iso. It was definitely the 32 bit version. Basically, the system locked up during the live CD bootup. I could install many different distros on this computer including Ubuntu 10.04 LTS. Mint was reading from the CD then the screen became black. I could not do anything else, but a hard power down (Not even Alt-SysReq-b worked). The same thing happened again if I re-try to boot the Mint CD. My guess is that it was not happy with the graphic card, but I could not get any info why it crashed.

Dell Inspiron 2400, 512 Mb RAM, 100 Gb HD, Intel integrated graphic card 82845G/GL, currently dual boot with XP and Ubuntu 10.04.

Ebere
May 21st, 2010, 06:10 PM
I did not even get that far...pretty sure I downloaded the right iso. It was definitely the 32 bit version. Basically, the system locked up during the live CD bootup. I could install many different distros on this computer including Ubuntu 10.04 LTS. Mint was reading from the CD then the screen became black. I could not do anything else, but a hard power down (Not even Alt-SysReq-b worked). The same thing happened again if I re-try to boot the Mint CD. My guess is that it was not happy with the graphic card, but I could not get any info why it crashed.

Dell Inspiron 2400, 512 Mb RAM, 100 Gb HD, Intel integrated graphic card 82845G/GL, currently dual boot with XP and Ubuntu 10.04.

The graphic card is my guess, as well.

I had the same problem whilst trying to get mint installed on my laptop.

Here is a link to the thread I had going at Linux Mint forums, when this happened...

http://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?f=46&t=47559

Read it through. I did finally solve it.

dnguyen1963
May 21st, 2010, 09:19 PM
The graphic card is my guess, as well.

I had the same problem whilst trying to get mint installed on my laptop.

Here is a link to the thread I had going at Linux Mint forums, when this happened...

http://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?f=46&t=47559

Read it through. I did finally solve it.


Thanks for the suggestions. I'll try it this weekend and let you know how it goes.:guitar:

Ebere
May 21st, 2010, 11:06 PM
Thanks for the suggestions. I'll try it this weekend and let you know how it goes.:guitar:

You are most welcome.

I hope it works for you.