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View Full Version : Steve Jobs: Straight Talker or Rude Guy?



Sporkman
May 12th, 2010, 05:55 PM
Dear Steve Jobs,

I wanted to write and express my concern about some recent problems that I have had with Apple Care. This week, my MacBook Pro unfortunately sustained water damage. I understand this is entirely my fault but it is still something I would like to get fixed. After three or four calls I was finally able to get a straight answer. While I was happy to get a straight answer, I was not at all happy with the answer. It is very worrisome to me that the only way to get my computer fixed is to pay almost $300.00 up front with no guarantee that this will fix the problem. I was horrified to learn that their is no system to assess the problem and bill once all damage is known. I am reluctant to put money into a problem that could easily grow. I have had three Apple computers in a row. I love using them but I am not sure if my replacement will be one. I feel powerless in the situation and the whole experience has turned me off of the Apple company.

Sincerely,

Xxxxxx Xxxx



Xxxxxxx,

This is what happens when your MacBook Pro sustains water damage.They are pro machines and they donít like water. It sounds like youíre just looking for someone to get mad at other than yourself.

Steve

Pro Rude Dude: http://www.boygeniusreport.com/2008/03/28/apple-doesnt-care-about-its-customers/

Pro Straight Talker: http://www.crunchgear.com/2008/03/30/steve-jobs-sends-pointed-email-to-macbook-pro-owner-poor-customer-service/

I vote "rude dude". While the $300 fee may be justified (see comments in Pro Straight Talker article), his rude response was not.

RiceMonster
May 12th, 2010, 05:59 PM
I question the legitimacy of this. Why would Steve Jobs be emailing a customer? If he did get the email, you would think he would just send them to customer service.

sydbat
May 12th, 2010, 06:01 PM
I question the legitimacy of this. Why would Steve Jobs be emailing a customer? If he did get the email, you would think he would just send them to customer service.This.

mickie.kext
May 12th, 2010, 06:03 PM
Jobs is responding to email. Not emailng. But sure, I too question legitimacy because I would expect Jobs not to be so kind like he have been. I would expect not to respond at all.

BslBryan
May 12th, 2010, 06:03 PM
"Sent from my iPad" or it's fake. :P

McRat
May 12th, 2010, 06:08 PM
Jobs is responding to email. Not emailng. But sure, I too question legitimacy because I would expect Jobs not to be so kind like he have been. I would expect not to respond at all.

It seems Steve Jobs personally answers a LOT of his own emails. The replies are often VERY short, and often abrupt.

Remember he's almost 60 now, and old farts aren't as polite in general, especially when hassled.

And he's right. You DON'T get expensive electronics wet. This is old news. There are water-resistant versions of notebook computers, but Apple/Dell/HP/Acer don't make them.

Excedio
May 12th, 2010, 06:13 PM
Couldn't tell you if this is real or fake, however the Boy Genius Report has this information:



From: Steve Jobs <sjobs@apple.com>
Date: March 27, 2008 6:53:46 PM EDT
To: [email removed <xxxxx@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: Apple Care Concern
Delivered-To: xxxxx@gmail.com
Received: by 10.70.40.17 with SMTP id n17cs178340wxn; Thu, 27 Mar 2008 15:53:48 -0700 (PDT)
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Received: from relay13.apple.com (relay13.apple.com [17.128.113.29]) by mail-out3.apple.com (Postfix) with ESMTP id 8B8A3261B509 for <xxxxx@gmail.com>; Thu, 27 Mar 2008 15:53:47 -0700 (PDT)
Received: from relay13.apple.com (unknown [127.0.0.1]) by relay13.apple.com (Symantec Mail Security) with ESMTP id 72BE928050 for <xxxxx@gmail.com>; Thu, 27 Mar 2008 15:53:47 -0700 (PDT)
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Return-Path: <sjobs@apple.com>
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Authentication-Results: mx.google.com; spf=pass (google.com: domain of sjobs@apple.com designates 17.254.13.22 as permitted sender) smtp.mail=sjobs@apple.com
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References: <B42B0DBE-EE24-4879-ABC8-940D419906AA@gmail.com>
X-Mailer: Apple Mail (2.919.2)
X-Brightmail-Tracker: AAAAAA==

GarmaZed
May 12th, 2010, 06:14 PM
I question the legitimacy of this. Why would Steve Jobs be emailing a customer? If he did get the email, you would think he would just send them to customer service.

Steve Jobs has a history of responding to random emails in the past, so I think it's legit.

As for who is at fault here, I'm feeling kinda split. I totally understand the manufacturer's side with how the user has clearly voided his warranty, and he's liable for the repair... but to pay $300 to just open Pandora's box, and find out if it's even salvageable without any insurance seems incredibly high.

That could be 25% the cost of a 13-inch MBP, and that's before the actual charge of any repair. I work as tech support for a big box retailer, often acting as the middle man between customer and OEM for warranty repairs, and this happens occasionally with some manufacturers, but it's mostly for shipping charges that a customer would have to pay for.

Tristam Green
May 12th, 2010, 06:17 PM
That's a legit email, and it was sent from his iPhone, not from his iPad.

In response to the OP: One can be both at the same time, and I think Steve Jobs is the quintessential rude straight-talker.

mickie.kext
May 12th, 2010, 06:23 PM
It seems Steve Jobs personally answers a LOT of his own emails. The replies are often VERY short, and often abrupt.

Remember he's almost 60 now, and old farts aren't as polite in general, especially when hassled.

And he's right. You DON'T get expensive electronics wet. This is old news. There are water-resistant versions of notebook computers, but Apple/Dell/HP/Acer don't make them.

Haha, you have a point. But I do not think he is quite right. Guy basically just asked Apple to assess the damage so before deciding whether to buy new Laptop (from apple) or get this repaired. And Apple is asking him to fork $300 just for looking at Laptop, and then God know how much more for fixing, or buying new laptop.

Tristam Green
May 12th, 2010, 06:27 PM
Haha, you have a point. But I do not think he is quite right. Guy basically just asked Apple to assess the damage so before deciding whether to buy new Laptop (from apple) or get this repaired. And Apple is asking him to fork $300 just for looking at Laptop, and then God know how much more for fixing, or buying new laptop.

Diagnostic fees are a fact of life. Go take your car to a shop, out-of-warranty, and ask them what's wrong with it. I guarantee you'll be charged at least $85 flat-hour diagnostic fee for a 10-minute test.

MooPi
May 12th, 2010, 06:30 PM
It seems Steve Jobs personally answers a LOT of his own emails. The replies are often VERY short, and often abrupt.

Remember he's almost 60 now, and old farts aren't as polite in general, especially when hassled.

And he's right. You DON'T get expensive electronics wet. This is old news. There are water-resistant versions of notebook computers, but Apple/Dell/HP/Acer don't make them.
Can I use this in response to someone calling me rude :) I can tell them it's just a matter of age and you said so. From, not so old a fart but getting up there.

ssj6akshat
May 12th, 2010, 06:31 PM
I question the legitimacy of this. Why would Steve Jobs be emailing a customer? If he did get the email, you would think he would just send them to customer service.


Everybody knows that Steve Jobs' email is sjobs[at]apple[dot]com same goes for Mark Shuttlworth which is mark[at]ubuntu[dot]com

and they reply to emails

mickie.kext
May 12th, 2010, 06:32 PM
Diagnostic fees are a fact of life. Go take your car to a shop, out-of-warranty, and ask them what's wrong with it. I guarantee you'll be charged at least $85 flat-hour diagnostic fee for a 10-minute test.

Black is problem. He is not out of warranty, he even paid for additional special warranty they call "Apple care". If that mean something, he should get special treatment. Either that, or "Apple care" is just excuse for taking more money for nothing.

MooPi
May 12th, 2010, 06:36 PM
Have any responders ever tried to open a Mac laptop to work on. Great googly moooglies they make it hard on a person. A gazillion small screws of varying sizes and shapes that all resemble, multiple layers just to change a hard drive out. By comparison my Compaq took two screws and I was in. So I guess the 300$ is warranted.:(

LowSky
May 12th, 2010, 06:44 PM
I've owned one Apple product and it was a bad experience, never again.

pwnst*r
May 12th, 2010, 06:44 PM
Pro Rude Dude: http://www.boygeniusreport.com/2008/03/28/apple-doesnt-care-about-its-customers/

Pro Straight Talker: http://www.crunchgear.com/2008/03/30/steve-jobs-sends-pointed-email-to-macbook-pro-owner-poor-customer-service/

I vote "rude dude". While the $300 fee may be justified (see comments in Pro Straight Talker article), his rude response was not.

Fake.

eriktheblu
May 12th, 2010, 06:49 PM
It is very worrisome to me that the only way to get my computer fixed is to pay almost $300.00 up front
Probably not much more than it costs to receive the machine, administratively process it, then have a tech take it apart and ship it back.

with no guarantee that this will fix the problem.
Who in their right mind would make such a guarantee without first diagnosing the problem?


I was horrified to learn that their is no system to assess the problem and bill once all damage is known.
So the system should be what exactly? Send the computer to Apple, let them spend their resources (time, labor, equipment) to diagnose the problem, then never get paid once you realize it's not worth fixing?


I am reluctant to put money into a problem that could easily grow.Yet somehow Apple should be eager to do the same?

McRat
May 12th, 2010, 06:50 PM
Can I use this in response to someone calling me rude :) I can tell them it's just a matter of age and you said so. From, not so old a fart but getting up there.

It's one of the perks of getting gray...
:)
"Sport, I've got socks older than you are, so STFU unless spoken to first."

McRat
May 12th, 2010, 06:54 PM
Guys, this is a fact of life when you have consumer goods that have low resale value.

My Canon camera failed, and they wanted $150 before they would look at it. It was a $300 camera.

If it's any consolation, Apple has a very good rep with the repair policies compared to other consumer electronic companies. Often that $300 will cover all repairs or a new computer.

pwnst*r
May 12th, 2010, 06:54 PM
Probably not much more than it costs to receive the machine, administratively process it, then have a tech take it apart and ship it back.

Who in their right mind would make such a guarantee without first diagnosing the problem?


So the system should be what exactly? Send the computer to Apple, let them spend their resources (time, labor, equipment) to diagnose the problem, then never get paid once you realize it's not worth fixing?

Yet somehow Apple should be eager to do the same?

/thread

Tristam Green
May 12th, 2010, 07:00 PM
Black is problem. He is not out of warranty, he even paid for additional special warranty they call "Apple care". If that mean something, he should get special treatment. Either that, or "Apple care" is just excuse for taking more money for nothing.

Warranties, even "special gold edition apple awesomesauce" warranties, have limitations and exceptions. I can almost guarantee water damage isn't covered by any warranty Apple offers - even if it's as simple as "spilled cup of water".


/thread

^-- +234525

McRat
May 12th, 2010, 07:26 PM
Only slightly off-topic:

Bought a Sony notebook computer for $1200. At 6 months of age, the screen cracked. It was not handled any rougher than other notebooks. It was just flimsier than most. Not lighter, smaller, or better, just weaker than Dells, Compaqs, IBMs, Toshibas.

Sony wanted over $800 to replace the $150 LCD display. $800 up front. They would not sell parts. Since the computer crashed at random since day one, it sits on the shelf with a busted screen.

That is the norm for the industry, like it or not.

mickie.kext
May 12th, 2010, 07:30 PM
Warranties, even "special gold edition apple awesomesauce" warranties, have limitations and exceptions. I can almost guarantee water damage isn't covered by any warranty Apple offers - even if it's as simple as "spilled cup of water".



^-- +234525

I was not arguing that they should replace laptop under warranty when is clearly customer's fault, only that customer should get free diagnostics. Because if not, what is the point of warranty then? You can go to local computer store/repair shop and get thing examined cheaper. I know that some companies have that stupid policy to charge everything and anything even if it drives away customers, and that is fact of life. But whatever, nevermind, it is not important enough to argue about that.

CharlesA
May 12th, 2010, 07:34 PM
Water damage on electronics usually voids the warranty. Fact of life.

Tristam Green
May 12th, 2010, 07:39 PM
Water damage on electronics usually voids the warranty. Fact of life.

no wai, you kidding?

-Tristam Green

sent from my dEsktop

pwnst*r
May 12th, 2010, 07:40 PM
lol

KiwiNZ
May 12th, 2010, 07:40 PM
User received one life's little lessons. Look after your assets. There is no free rides.

McRat
May 12th, 2010, 07:41 PM
For those who do not know:

Many modern consumer electronics have water sensors in them now, cellphones in particular.

As far as cellphones go, there is a reasonable expectation that you would have to use one in the rain. And the sensors have been triggered by high humidity as well. This is a current battleground, and IIRC there are lawsuits pending.

Seems the focus on the cellphones should not be voiding warranties, but making phones water-resistant.

Penguin Guy
May 12th, 2010, 07:52 PM
...my MacBook Pro unfortunately sustained water damage. I understand this is entirely my fault...

This is what happens when your MacBook Pro sustains water damage. They are pro machines and they don't like water.
Fair reply, what did you expect?

CharlesA
May 12th, 2010, 07:53 PM
no wai, you kidding?

-Tristam Green

sent from my dEsktop

Made my morning. :)

McRat
May 12th, 2010, 10:37 PM
For those who have a need, Panasonic makes a Toughbook line of notebooks that are water-resistant and armored.

The price? If the price is a factor in your decision-making, you aren't a potential customer. About $6,000 for a 13" model with normal options.

JDShu
May 13th, 2010, 01:43 AM
Apple is a large enough company for Jobs to be as rude as he wants to customers.

Bachstelze
May 13th, 2010, 02:09 AM
Serves customer right, if you ask me.

ubunterooster
May 13th, 2010, 02:36 AM
Do some research on Jobs' history. He knows how to run a business well. He's not known for being a nice guy and has no need to be a nice guy. He is a great success and I would not be surprised to see him overtake Ballmer.