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AM_SOS
May 11th, 2010, 08:24 AM
hello all,
i am currently using KK 9.10 and am satisfied with its performance.
now the update manager tells me that a new Ubuntu release 10.04 LTS is available.
i have previously upgraded my system to newer versions of ubuntu starting with 8.04 .
however, this time i notice that 10.04 seems to have a different kind of suffix - "LTS". does this mean that this version is not meant for general purpose users like me ? is it perhaps for specialist users / programmers ?
in case it is for general purpose users, are there any major improvements over KK 9.10 ?
thanks !

Labus
May 11th, 2010, 08:50 AM
LTS=Long Term Support
It will be supported and updated longer than usual releases.

darkod
May 11th, 2010, 08:50 AM
LTS means Long Term Supported. It will be supported for longer time, and more attention paid to improvements, etc. Usually it is released every 2yr or similar. 8.04 was the previous LTS.

Some people wait and upgrade only from LTS to LTS, for example from 8.04 to 10.04, without upgrading every 6 months with new release.

c00lwaterz
May 11th, 2010, 08:55 AM
LTS = long term support. This LTS is supported for longer period of time and The updates are high importance.

AM_SOS
May 11th, 2010, 09:21 AM
hey thanks!
seems to me the main issue then is whether to upgrade from the LTS version to the 'normal' versions which are put out every 6 months.
can anyone shed light on the issues with upgrading from LTS to LTS ?
so far i have been upgrading every 6 months and was happy to see the improvements to the software center in 9.10.
will i not be missing out on improvements and other changes if i do not upgrade from the 10.04 LTS to the normal 6 months release when it comes ?
thanks!

vaiocomputer
May 11th, 2010, 09:32 AM
Yes. If you update from LTS to LTS you won't get the new features until the next LTS comes out. I don't like to wait that long, so every 6 months it is.

AM_SOS
May 11th, 2010, 10:46 AM
thanks,
i think right now i want to keep upgrading every 6 months. so should i go ahead and upgrade to 10.04 LTS now ?
or should i wait for the next release 6 months later since i dont want to participate in the LTS system ?
you said that one misses out on the new things that come up with a new version every 6 months. i am curious - what exactly do these new features include ? are we talking about things like firefox updates etc or more complicated things to do with the internal OS programming ?
basically if i go for LTS will i miss out on e.g. updates and newer versions of firefox etc that come up every 6 months ?
thanks!

Razzie
May 11th, 2010, 10:54 AM
thanks,
i think right now i want to keep upgrading every 6 months. so should i go ahead and upgrade to 10.04 LTS now ?
or should i wait for the next release 6 months later since i dont want to participate in the LTS system ?
you said that one misses out on the new things that come up with a new version every 6 months. i am curious - what exactly do these new features include ? are we talking about things like firefox updates etc or more complicated things to do with the internal OS programming ?
basically if i go for LTS will i miss out on e.g. updates and newer versions of firefox etc that come up every 6 months ?
thanks!

Its the more built in features that are changed, like, updated effects and things in gnome, features like hal removal, updated user interfaces etc. etc.

things like firefox are upgraded when developers put a new version in the repository. what can change is the default browser in the new version of ubuntu for example

at least this is what i understand from it ;)

You can jump over now to the new lts version, and in six months jump over again to the short term support version.

My opinion on LTS and the shorter releases is, if you want the bleeding edge stuff, new features every 6 months, and keep up with newest development. and dont mind tinkering a bit to get your system working like you want it every half year. take the newest version without looking at the support term.

If you like a stable platform, dont care about new features that much, and dont have the time tweaking your system every 6 months take the LTS version and stick with it till the next one comes out ;)

vaiocomputer
May 12th, 2010, 02:52 AM
If you want to get the newest features stable enough for general release, then upgrade every 6 months. Some of those upgrades will be 'LTS,' so there isn't like some separate system. LTS releases are just normal releases with extra attention for stability and less for new features.

AM_SOS
May 12th, 2010, 02:56 PM
thanks all !

but can you please be more specific as to what features i will lose out on if i choose to go for LTS versions ?

e.g. in 9.10 there were improvements to the software center and a nice interface was introduced. had i been using an LTS version would i have missed out on such features ?

basically i would like to know what kind of features / improvements i will lose out if i go for LTS ?

ALSO, many of you have mentioned LTS versions leading to greater stability of the OS. although i am not a heavy user, i can vouch for the general stability of ubuntu.
so what do you mean when you say LTS allows for stability ? of what kind and stability during what processes ?

thanks again !

vaiocomputer
May 12th, 2010, 11:08 PM
Here, look at this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Ubuntu_releases .
If you want to upgrade from LTS to LTS, you'll basically be upgrading every 2 years and miss out on all the supplementary 6 month updates. You'll basically be skipping versions and receive software feature updates only on 2 year intervals instead of 6 month intervals.

AM_SOS
May 14th, 2010, 04:06 PM
thanks for the links.
basically, i need to find out something simple from the point of view of my usage- with the LTS i will get firefox 3.6 and other such softwares.
i a newer versions of such softwares that i use will be made available with the 6 monthly release of Ubuntu, will i also get a chance to upgrade these softwares to the newer versions?
or will i have to say keep using firefox 3.6 for 2 yrs and then finally upgrade to whichever version is being offered with the next LTS in 2012?

secondly, take system facilities such as the software center. would the new look software center launched recently have been offered instantly to LTS users ? or will they be getting it only now when they upgrade to 10.04 ?

thanks!

colintivy
May 14th, 2010, 05:21 PM
Going from one LTS to the next gives you at least everything that was in the previous 6 month update (perhaps without any bugs that may have been present). The comment about a bit of system tweaking to sort out the system when going for the bleeding edge software potentionally may mean the removal of bugs found after the issue came out. This ought to be much less of a problem going LTS to LTS when they should have all been dealt with during the production of the new one. This does not say that there will not be issues with a new version but at least there should be fewer.

Having your /Home on a seperate partition should allow for the security of your historical data and settings.

snowpine
May 14th, 2010, 06:54 PM
The default behavior for Ubuntu LTS is this:


or will i have to say keep using firefox 3.6 for 2 yrs and then finally upgrade to whichever version is being offered with the next LTS in 2012?

However, keep in mind, you can upgrade any application to any version you want at any time. Just because the Ubuntu version is "frozen" does not mean you can't install a newer version yourself. I recommend doing this sparingly, as it can potentially make your system less stable, and to only use trusted software sources.

For example, I use the Ubuntuzilla method to get the latest stable Firefox: http://sourceforge.net/apps/mediawiki/ubuntuzilla/index.php?title=Main_Page

In other words, the default behavior for all Ubuntu releases (including LTS) is to "freeze" all applications at their current version on release day, for maximum stability (they will get bug fixes and security patches over time, but not major version updates). Individual users may choose to install newer versions of applications that they need for work/play.

AM_SOS
May 15th, 2010, 08:19 AM
thanks all for clarifying the issue !

for now i think it should be a better idea to stick with the regular 6 monthly updates. that way one gets quick access to all the latest changes made to the OS and supporting programs (firefox etc).
as far as the problem with bugs is concerned, i think the right thing to do is to keep the system updated. that way the bugs shouldn't really matter !

thanks !