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Axel-P
May 3rd, 2010, 11:05 PM
(I'm not sure if I should post this here, move if necessary)

Dear *buntuers,

I have a question for you all: Why Linux?

I'll put thin in context ;)

So, starting in august, I'll be the head of the Linux team at my college. Our team make many projects in order to learn about various topics and in order to help others. As the president of the team, one of my duties is to get more members, so each trimester, the president and another member visit the classrooms of the department of computer science in order to find potential members. And I need some help :P.

I just would want some questions to be answered.

1)Why did you tried/installed linux in the first place?
2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?
3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?
4)Any other advice you may find helpful :)

Notes:
I know that I may find the answer to some of these questions with Google, and that's what I'm doing, so if you know of some thread, blogpost, etc. that may be helpful I'll appreciate it.

In our college we are pretty much platform independent. There are 1 or 2 softs that can't be run in Linux, like the flash IDE from adobe ](*,), but it's no big deal. I'm pretty much sure that the students will dual boot and I usually run a virtual machine if necessary :)

We do have a linux class, but just one, and it's DAMN boring. The last thing you want to know is read trough the man pages in order to learn the obscure options of grep. I'm just happy to know that it doesn't affects the interest in Linux

Thank you all!

jerenept
May 3rd, 2010, 11:17 PM
Why is this here? it should be in the Community Cafe.
I installed Ubuntu Lucid bcuz-

1)Because I can't afford to buy a Windows Product Key
2)My computer is too old to run Vista or Win7
3)NO D@MN VIRUSES AND ANTIVIRUS!!!!
4)Lucid runs unbelievably fast!!!
5)#3 AGAIN!!!
6)Opensource software is amazing!

A Computer Science student should do what is most beneficial to him/her. If you need Windows, keep it. If not, get rid of it in all its buggy, virus-infested glory.

I would recommend Ubuntu 10.04 or Linux Mint 9.

Other advice... Donate, maybe? You can help out in this way.
You could spread the word about Ubuntu, show off how fast your computer starts,etc.
Keep your computer updated!!--VERY IMPORTANT! It is very simple and gets you the latest and greatest from the FOSS community

WorMzy
May 3rd, 2010, 11:18 PM
1)Why did you tried/installed linux in the first place?
I believe that software should be free, and preferably open source, so Linux was an obvious choice. I also like how stable Linux is, frequent crashes were the bane of my Windows experience.

2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?
I dualboot so I can play games on Windows and get the most out of my hardware while doing so. Also, if the student needs a program that only exists on Windows, then flushing it is probably not the best idea!

3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?
Probably Kubuntu if the newbie is coming from Windows, I think that KDE would appeal more to them than GNOME.

4)Any other advice you may find helpful
Don't give up! Windows is ridiculously easy for the typical end user to use, and it likes to hold your hand through the entire experience. Linux is a lot less user friendly in that regard, as someones signature on here says: Linux assumes you know what you're doing. If you don't know what you're doing: ask for help! But don't rely on others help, try to understand things for yourself too.

TBABill
May 3rd, 2010, 11:20 PM
1. Windows Vista got infected with viruses too many times to invest my time in it. I ran the latest and greatest software to prevent it, but you can't stop kids from clicking the wrong .exe file. Windows causes me a lot of work as a parent and owner of 5 computers.
2. Doesn't matter what they do, but keeping Windows is a good idea if you ever may have a situation where something only works with Windows. Everyone has their own opinion, but nothing wrong with having whatever you need when you need it. Dual, triple, whatever....boot to the OS you need for what you need.
3. I would recommend PCLinuxOS or Mint to a newcomer. Ubuntu is easy for sure, but those are even easier and all the codecs are just setup for you. Makes life easy to get going when you have no idea what you are doing.
4. Distro hopping is fun, great for learning and a test of your skills at setting up various Linux systems, desktop environments, etc. Take the time to learn several and understand the differences, both good and bad. And take the time to answer others' questions when they are new...giving back is what a free OS is all about.

SweetShadow
May 3rd, 2010, 11:38 PM
1)Cause i had an appetite for destruction and my first installation ever was a Slack 7 or something.talking about s&m.Cause i knew windows could satisfy my needs but i knew i had another option available.Much tougher but still an option.

2)Because everything comes down to choices.I can use both Oo or MS office to write a .doc or make a presentation.Games i choose to play (EVE Online and log in wow couple times a month) work great (FOR ME) under wine and windows.Some apps don't though so i still cant get rid of the win7 im dualbooting.

3)Something *light* in terms of functionality.Having a newcomer bump his head against the wall cause his new all shiny OS cant play mp3's or dvd's is a no go but as long as the procedure is a couple of clicks to get the job done is acceptable.Ubuntu/mint would be my *proposal*.As everything else in this field,its a matter of choice.

4)You should be really patient since no one is obligated to do anything in this community driven project.Do your part, feel good about it and in the end of the day one more pc will be running a linux dist.All you have to compete against is yourself not MS.

frappe1
May 3rd, 2010, 11:43 PM
1. I dumped Windows because I was fed up with the constant overcommercialization harming the quality of the software. When Vista and 7 passed for poor excuses for innovation, I knew the time had come to completely purge myself of Windows. With OSS, software that works takes precedence over mandates from the marketing department. OSS devs can focus on real innovation, rather than ginning up something "new" so people have to buy all over again.

The software in the repos was another huge motivating factor. Almost everything in the repos is quality software produced by devoted people. Some of it might lack functionality or not be fit for a specific task, but those issues can be worked around by trying different packages until I find the right one. With Windows, I would waste hours looking for programs that were overhyped commercial crap, then waste hours more making sure the software didn't phone home or contain spyware. I never knew how fit those programs were, because all of them had been dressed up and hyped by marketing. Marketing gets in the way of honestly communicating program capabilities. OSS devs are very upfront about what their software can and cannot do, because they aren't going for a hard sell.

I also value software which is free and whose source is open for inspection. I can modify and extend OS software as I see fit, which allows for an unparalleled level of integration and usability that isn't possible when commercial developers are doing everything possible to wall people off from making better use of software.


2. With the exception of highly specialized programs for (usually) professional use, OSS will do everything that proprietary will, and it does it better. Anybody who does not rely on one killer app has no need for the crappy closed source commercial software. Ubuntu, out of the box, does everything an average user needs, and can be greatly extended by opening Synaptic.

Science students have a brain, which means they don't need software built on the idea that a Visa card can substitute for a brain, as commercial software "support" believes.

Students might as well rip the band-aid off and get the transition over with sooner than later.


3. Ubuntu Karmic. There are better distros for other purposes, but for an out of the box system which works, Ubuntu fits the bill. Lucid still has too many bugs for anyone who doesn't want a bunch of issues.


4. The Internet is a valuable resource. If you have a problem with OSS, chances are that 100 other people have already found that issue and collaborated on a way to resolve it. That level of support just isn't possible with commercial software, since the average "customer" (not user) will call tech support, pay for their answer, then move on without helping document and correct the problem in the code base at large.

zacktu
May 3rd, 2010, 11:48 PM
Does your computer science use Linux for any courses? If that's true, then in my experience you've got a hard sell. Is there at least one course where it's more natural to use Linux?

smellyman
May 3rd, 2010, 11:48 PM
1)Why did you tried/installed linux in the first place?

A lot of people hate this on this board....,but I bought a Mac and realized how much better an OS can be other than Windows. It pushed me to Linux as well.

2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?

Well a computer science student should dual boot out of intellectual curiosity. It is their future field afterall

3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?

Mint, Ubuntu, PCLOS

4)Any other advice you may find helpful :smile:

One of the things I love about Linux is repositories/package managers. No longer do you have to spend time researching/searching/evaluating/buying/praying there is no spyware in apps. Hit the package mangers, find the software and try it. There are so many programs available (which was one of the surprises to me) and often far superior to any Windows counterpart.

linden940
May 3rd, 2010, 11:48 PM
1)Why did you tried/installed Linux in the first place?
To try something else other than just windows because at that time windows was starting to drive me nuts (got another bug and the whole system crashed) so went googling and found ubuntu so before I reformatted I gave it a try...ended up switching BACK to windows for about 8months (during that 8months I learned what i could about linux as a system.

2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?
Linux in short is more stable and can last longer than some window systems because of all the bugs that are out there for windows. If the person has some computer know how (from the computer science classes/labs) they should be able to learn Linux pretty fast.

3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?
Ubuntu and the reason being that its wide used is many country's and the help that a person can get per the system is of up most.

4)Any other advice you may find helpful
As to learning anything that is new, you should READ about it first before you go trying to do anything so you know what you are getting into. This website would be a very good place to read up on Ubuntu but going to the other sites that are on the world wide web would be great as well. Another site that would be good to check into would be Youtube.com

frappe1
May 3rd, 2010, 11:59 PM
Does your computer science use Linux for any courses? If that's true, then in my experience you've got a hard sell. Is there at least one course where it's more natural to use Linux?
On the flip side, most CS degrees aren't utterly dependent on Windows, specifically. The few courses that are can be easily complied with inside a virtual machine. If your degree is in Windows API programming, then maybe Windows is a necessity, but other than that, 99% of college, including CS, is fairly OS neutral.

If Windows were such a big deal there wouldn't be Macs all over campus.

I would think it's most natural to use the best software overall, and worry about handling the 1% exceptions with exception handling, not by choosing software entirely around them.

OpenOffice + GIMP out of the box, for the half of the degree that is GenEd, makes more sense than constantly trying to finagle student keys for Office and Photoshop that, even with generous academic discounts, represent money that indebted students shouldn't be spending.

NightTiger2
May 4th, 2010, 12:05 AM
1)Why did you tried/installed linux in the first place?

Because I got tired of spending too much time and too often by trying to figure out problems with firewalls, anti viruses, anti spywares and anti whatever else is there anymore today on Windows

Because I want buy new hardware when I decide and not when M$ tells me to

And because of the simplicity of the interface and menus


2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?

Duelboot, so the switch will be less traumatic

3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?

Haven't decided yet, ubuntu 9.10 disappointed me and haven't checked others yet

paped
May 4th, 2010, 12:11 AM
For me it's....

1)Why did you tried/installed linux in the first place?
Needed a proper server for home and I can get a very stable and low cost one with Linux that runs on older hardware, the switch to desktop Linux was due to Vista, viruses, high cost (of Windows and the hardware to run it decently) and the stability of the server I have.
2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?
Why not is probably a better question, if they are computer students surely for when they get in to the job market having exposure to more the normal MS OS's and thinking would be a good thing.
3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer? Ubuntu or Mandriva, mainly GUI based and pretty simple to master.
4)Any other advice you may find helpful - Give it a try and have a play to see what you can do..

florus
May 4th, 2010, 12:24 AM
1) Because I found Vista unintuitive and I wanted to be in control of my own computer.
2) Dual boot so that students can make their own comparisons.
3) Ubuntu as it is well supported and has a great forum community.
4) Install with a separate /home partition.

ankspo71
May 4th, 2010, 12:49 AM
1)Why did you tried/installed linux in the first place?
2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?
3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?
4)Any other advice you may find helpful :)


1) I don't like MS's way of licensing and re-activation basically.

2) Dual booting gives you the best of both worlds. (but I will only dual boot linux now).

3) Ubuntu or derivatives (Mint, Kubuntu etc), PClinuxOS, Mandriva.

4) If you are a reader, regularly skim through these forums. I learn something new all the time just by looking around at the recent posts here.

Also, if you need alternate software, look at:
http://alternativeto.net/
http://www.osalt.com/

For 99% of your customization needs:
http://ubuntu-art.org/
http://gnome-look.org/

robvas
May 4th, 2010, 12:59 AM
1)Why did you tried/installed linux in the first place?

I started playing around with Linux in the late 90's, Windows crashed all the time back then. Plus Linux let you run mail server, web server, etc all on one box!

2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?

Do you use UNIX computers in your classes? It's great having all the UNIX tools like lexx/yac, compilers for different languages, different shells, etc.

3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?

Ubuntu is a good choice because it will install and run on most computers without much hassle. You can't really go wrong with SuSE, Fedora, or the other major distributions these days though. In fact, some people think Linux is too easy these days!

4)Any other advice you may find helpful :)

Keep plugging away at stuff. Read the man pages and everything you can find in /usr/share/doc. Ask Google! Also, if you're bored, try learning a new UNIX command.

bdentremont
May 4th, 2010, 01:17 AM
1)Why did you tried/installed linux in the first place?
2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?
3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?
4)Any other advice you may find helpful

1) I tried Linux because I have been impressed with the increasing quality of open source desktop software and ended up mostly using open source for my daily work. I'd been toying with the idea for a while, but after tinkering with a Linux web server for a while and hearing all the bad press about the resource demands of Vista, decided it was time.

2) I tried dual booting in the past and found it a pain to maintain two complete systems and switch between them, particular considering that all the common applications that one needs to use while doing a task in Windows need to be duplicated. For this reason, I'd strongly recommend virtual machine or wine rather than dual boot for people that need access to particular Win-only office products on an occasional basis. Of course, gaming is different matter which I think would be conducive to dual boot if I was into that. I'm an Mech. E. grad student, I generally do my own office work in OpenOffice and find it actually a bit better for technical writing. I use Word occasionally for collaborative works that demand this format. Windows gets opened a few times a month.

3) I've been pleased with my choice of Ubuntu, mainly due to the huge about of documentation both official and in the forums.

4) Find yourself a good description of the rational of the standard directories in the Unix file structure before tinkering.

Axel-P
May 4th, 2010, 01:31 AM
Oh my god, so many answers!!
I'm sooo pleased :D

I should have specified this! I'll edit my post :P
In our college we are pretty much platform independent. There are 1 or 2 softs that can't be run in Linux, like the flash IDE from adobe ](*,)

And just for you to know, the reason why I'm asking this is because I will have to answer to this questions (or similar) in my presentation :P. I'll keep reading future replies!

Thanks again!

Palanthas
May 4th, 2010, 01:38 AM
1)Why did you try/install linux in the first place?
If I remember right, my dad had brought home some Hed Hat CDs and I tried them but got frustrated right away because I could not install any thing. I didn't under stand the terminal and was way to used to install wizard doing everything for me. Throw in the CD or download the file, double click setup/install.exe and a few minutes later your good to go. Like WorMzy pointed out, I was too used to having my hand held as it were. So I gave up for a few years and then found Ubuntu. I forget how... I installed it and after trying to install a few programs, failing of course... they were probably .exe/windows files, I started looking for help online and found these forums. Ever since then I have fallen in love with Ubuntu and I am always trying to convert others.

2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?
I used to dual boot but then a friend gave me an extra computer so now I have Ubuntu running on one machine and windows on the other. I think these students should dual boot especially if they are planning to work with/on computers. It would not be good for them to stick with only one OS.

3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?
Personally I prefer Ubuntu but to be honest I have only lightly tinkered with Fedora, Mint, and Kubuntu.

4)Any other advice you may find helpful
As others have said, don't give up. Keep plugging away. The more you can learn about the various operating systems the better.

Spiritof76
May 4th, 2010, 02:47 AM
1)Why did you tried/installed linux in the first place?
A college student was all excited about This Ubuntu thing I was needing to build a Desktop so I decided to give it a go.

2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?
While I use Ubuntu 99% of the time I wouldn't want to be without access to Windows. Have 3 systems now a Desktop, a netbook, and a server, They all run Ubunto Linux only the netbook is a dual bootable. If I only had one machine, It would be dual bootable. To be honest though it can be months between a Windows booting.

3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?
Ubuntu 10.4 is an LTS and is pretty nice. I haven't had a reason to try others though,

4)Any other advice you may find helpful
Linux and Ubuntu is a funny creature. I mentioned I run 3 systems that I use daily. Neither system resembles or behaves like the other. My Desktop has been Compiz whizzed out. The Netbook is pretty simplistic. and the server doesn't even have a monitor, mouse or keyboard. One of the things That have held back Linux is that it was originally designed by computer science geeks for computer science geeks. It has C SQL, make, Python, Perl and ruby all built in. Learning a litlle bit about a *nix type system makes it s little easier to to pick up Solaris, VAX/VMS or any other serious system. If you want to learn something from your OS, Linux is king.

Primefalcon
May 4th, 2010, 02:58 AM
Well I just got a new computer with XP on it around the end of 2007, I was already a fan of open source programs like Audacity, Firefox and other such programs....

I didn't like the the constant pay to upgrade with Microsoft, though I had no real dislike of Microsoft (that's actually changing now with the whole HTC like behavior they're throwing around, they frankly are acting like the evil corp I've always been arguing that they're not.....).

And though Linux sounded like a Lino product to me... I don't like apple with how closed they are let alone their inflated price.... So I thought I'll give Linux a good try... So I asked around for peoples opinions on what is the best Linux... the name I kept hearing was Ubuntu.... I downloaded fedora and wiped windows.... had issues (had it running since and I like it but not as much as Ubuntu)..... downloaded Ubuntu 7.10 on my wifes pc, worked perfectly.... haven't looked back Absolutely loved it from the first day.

2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?
gives a lot more power and easier to script with bash, easier to modify anything

3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?
Either Ubuntu or Mint since mint has codecs, flash, java and other stuff pre-installed and it has a windows like control panel and has a single windows like menu in the bottom left, one stupid complaint I hear from windows users on trying Ubuntu is, I can;t get used to no start bar... I hate this I am going back.... (don't laugh it has happened a lot)

4)Any other advice you may find helpful
don't play around try it seriously as your main OS for a week solid, be open

Axel-P
May 4th, 2010, 03:17 AM
I pretty much approve the idea of telling the newcomers to try Ubuntu or Mint. Besides the Open Source philosophy I don't see any reason to use Fedora instead of Ubuntu or Mint. And the only reason why I prefer Mint (my main OS with KDE) is because it has the important codecs out of the box :)


Thanks for all the answers!

Keep them going :) I'm good with computers not with marketing, so I like to have as many ideas as possible xD

23dornot23d
May 4th, 2010, 03:23 AM
1)Why did you tried/installed linux in the first place?

It was free with a magazine from what I can remember 1974 ... caledra ,,, I think ?

2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?

Not sure they should flush windows ... choice can be useful ... dualboot gives them
choice ...... sometimes you will find a program that only runs on one platform.

3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?

Linux Mint or Mandriva ...... Ubuntu is leading the way and is taking no prisoners ....

4)Any other advice you may find helpful

Stick with LINUX ,,,, you will have years of fun and become part of a team ......
Work towards helping others and helping yourself too .....
Look for what the underlying principal is of creating something this brilliant .....
Some may say its showing off ..... we all need to show off what we are capable of
now and again ...... so do it ...... on a system thats FREE ,,, check out BLENDER
and BLENDER artists.org ...... see what this is capable of .... a 15 year old did this
model on my site .... Thanator by Dudeman95 (http://sites.google.com/site/blenderlearn/assignments/project021) ,,,, check it out
ALSO WATCH
Elephants Dream (http://www.google.com/search?client=ubuntu&channel=fs&q=elephants+dream&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8) - if you haven't seen it already - Watch it .....

Primefalcon
May 4th, 2010, 03:24 AM
I am prefer Ubuntu for myself, love the community for for recommending to a new user, I am honestly swinging towards mint of late... seems easier for a new user and a little more... gulp... windows like, while still having all the power of Linux and security of sudo and the wide diversity of the ubuntu repo's

JDShu
May 4th, 2010, 03:48 AM
1)Why did you tried/installed linux in the first place?

I read in the news that China was using something called Linux as the official operating system. Curious, I asked a tech savvy friend who happened to use Linux (I didn't know until I mentioned it to him) and he showed me Knoppix.

2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?

My intro to computer science course required us to use Visual Studio, but the more advanced courses required the program to be compiled in gcc. svn was also a requirement. Course autograders might be sensitive to what compiler you used and it is better to be safe than sorry. Actually, I used puTTy and used the server's emacs for a very long time, but doing it straight from a Linux computer is much more comforatble.

3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?

Ubuntu, for me I have had the least hassle with it.

4)Any other advice you may find helpful

If you really want to learn how Linux works, LFS is probably a better project than Gentoo ;)

mamamia88
May 4th, 2010, 05:25 AM
because i knew a guy who wouldn't stop bragging about his mac right about the time vista started getting super slow. started looking up alternatives to vista and the rest is history

seenthelite
May 4th, 2010, 05:43 AM
1)Why did you tried/installed linux in the first place?

I was looking to buy my first Apple computer and came across Ubuntu, tried it out installed it and saved a lot of money.

2)Why should a student in computer science dual boot or flush Windows?

I dual boot because I can and Windows is a good alternate Operating System if and when required.

3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?

Mandriva KDE or Ubuntu 10.04

4)Any other advice you may find helpful

Enjoy Linux and Virtualbox is worth considering as a Linux host for other Operating Systems.

V for Vincent
May 4th, 2010, 06:25 AM
1)Why did you tried/installed linux in the first place?


I was scheduled to start working with a LAMP server, so I figured I'd get something of a head start. That, and I wanted to find out if the "Linux is better" arguments were true.



2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?


In addition to the relative security, stability etc. from which everyone can benefit, you can learn a lot from it. You very well might encounter Linux in your line of work and, if not, it gives you a chance to look at the code of whatever type of project interests you. CS students shouldn't limit themselves to just their curriculum.



3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?


Depends on the newcomer, but I think mint is a safe bet.



4)Any other advice you may find helpful :)

You could run into difficulties, but more often than not it's just because you're not used to anything else than Windows. Keep an open mind.

MarcusW
May 4th, 2010, 07:14 AM
1. Just curious I suppose.
2. Linux is generally easier to configure to fit your needs, which is nice if you don't mind messing around a bit with your system. (which a student in computer science shouldn't)
3. Ubuntu or Debian.
4. The repo is a good reason to switch, brings both ease when it comes to installing software and security since it's a secure download from a trusted source. :)

Techsnap
May 4th, 2010, 08:16 AM
1)Why did you tried/installed linux in the first place?
2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?
3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?
4)Any other advice you may find helpful :smile:

1. Because I didn't like Windows XP at all.
2. If you have a load of Windows specific programs then you should dual boot, however if most of your programs are Windows based I wouldn't recommend installing Linux in anything other than a Virtual Machine.
3. OpenSUSE, it's easy to configure, comes with loads of software and has a graphical administration program (YaST).
4. I recommend you do a lot of reading and definitely use a Virtual Machine for a while to learn how to use it, when I first switched to Linux I went straight to Slackware and I had to use my Dreamcast to go online to find out how to get my PCs modem working on Slackware.

nikhilbhardwaj
May 4th, 2010, 08:35 AM
2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?


it'll help you be a better programmer.
and anybody who studies computer science should be familiar with atleast two OSes
mac might be good too but its too expensive

MacUntu
May 4th, 2010, 08:47 AM
1)Why did you tried/installed linux in the first place?

Curiosity.

2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?

To broaden his horizon. Even if you're the theorist kind of student - it doesn't hurt to try new things. BTW - you're not an uncool or bad CS student if you stick to Windows. :P

3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?

The only one I used intensively is Ubuntu, so (K/L/X)Ubuntu or one of its derivates. OpenSUSE maybe. Not Arch, not Gentoo, not Debian, probably not Fedora.

4)Any other advice you may find helpful :)

Before using the command line for file operations, make sure you know what you're doing and you're fully awake (eg. I once deleted a subfolder '~' with 'rm -rf ~/', which wiped half of my home directory :D)

Hignar
May 4th, 2010, 09:01 AM
1)Why did you tried/installed linux in the first place?

I had to use *nix systems at university for access to matlab & LaTeX. I got curious about installing a *nix system on my own computer so I didn't have to wander up to campus. After a bit of internet research Linux seemed like the obvious choice. This was back in 2002 and the linux scene was much different back then.

2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?

I would have thought the main reason would be to have a better understanding of computers and have a more rounded knowledge of available operating systems. I'd also imagine that their intellectual curiosity should urge them on. If not I'd question how interested they truly are in their area of study.

3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?

Probably k/x/ubuntu or mint. However, I've introduced people to linux through Zenwalk before and they've got on fine but I did have to perform the initial install for them.

4)Any other advice you may find helpful

To make use of something that wasn't available when I started and try your first install inside a virtual machine.

Also make use of the online communities. Newbies will run into problems (I still run into problems now) and in my experience the best way to solve them is to look for people who've already had the same problems. If that fails then there are always people on various forums who are willing to help out.

v1ad
May 4th, 2010, 09:15 AM
anyone that is into computer science and does not give linux a full hearted try needs to find a different field.

MacUntu
May 4th, 2010, 09:17 AM
anyone that is into computer science and does not give linux a full hearted try needs to find a different field.

That's BS.

v1ad
May 4th, 2010, 09:19 AM
i did not say use it as an operating system.give it a try. if your are going into a computer science, you should be happy to try it out and experience everything associated with it.

MacUntu
May 4th, 2010, 09:24 AM
I know enough qualified post-graduates that never bothered trying Linux beyond running a LiveCD once or twice. As I said, it's good to broaden one's horizon, but it's no must.

v1ad
May 4th, 2010, 09:26 AM
what i am saying is, that there is CS Students, and there is CS enthusiasts. there is a difference. if you really love CS then you would give it a try.

smellyman
May 4th, 2010, 10:17 AM
anyone that is into computer science and does not give linux a full hearted try needs to find a different field.

i agree. that is why inmy answer to the question "Why dual boot linux and Windows if you're a computer science major' the answer was intellectual cruiosity.

doesn't make sense not to try it...

cap10Ibraim
May 4th, 2010, 01:12 PM
1)Why did you tried/installed Linux in the first place?
Because I want to learn more about computers and systems , to be a part of this great community, and to feel independent from microsoft and paid software companies
2)Why should a student in computer science dualboot or flush Windows?
I am a computer science student


I use windows for Assembly (masm) , I know that i can use nasm but I want to stick to the course
for .NET and using some windows libraries in C++



I use Ubuntu for Prolog , C , C++,PHP, and HTML

3)Which distro would you recommend to a newcomer?
newcomers are different it depends

juancarlospaco
May 4th, 2010, 01:17 PM
Why not???

Animal X
May 4th, 2010, 01:21 PM
It's waaaay better than a Rubik's Cube :)

98cwitr
May 4th, 2010, 02:02 PM
1)It was the uber way to compute
2)Because Linux is a superior OS to Windows
3)Ubuntu
4)Learn to use Google and the forums as much as you can.

koenn
May 4th, 2010, 08:50 PM
didn't read the entire thread, so maybe this has been said before:

seeing that you want to recrute in a computer science department, and assuming most people already 'know' Windows :

using a 2nd, rather different OS (Linux) can teach you that operating systems can solve the same problem in different ways.

Example:
Using only windows, you may get the idea that file paths always start with the drive letter of the drive/partion where the drive lives.
Linux shows you a that there are other ways of handling this. You learn that an OS is supposed to provide a mechanism to access files on storage media, that there is more than one way to accomplish this. You may also see certain advantages of one approach over the other.

Same goes for a bunch of other stuff : access to networked storage, handling file system security, ...