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JohneG
February 28th, 2010, 02:48 AM
As above. Ideally linux software but if there are programmes on other platforms that are also open source and you would consider good enough to be professional quality by all means include them :D Also if there are programmes that you would consider very close to professional please include them and explain what you think they are missing. Thanks

howlingmadhowie
February 28th, 2010, 02:56 AM
As above. Ideally linux software but if there are programmes on other platforms that are also open source and you would consider good enough to be professional quality by all means include them :D Also if there are programmes that you would consider very close to professional please include them and explain what you think they are missing. Thanks

i'd say the gnu utils are better than any other versions of the basic unix utilities. gcc is also a very good compiler collection. zsh is a brilliant shell. other things which occur to me:

apache.
the hotspot jvm.
firefox/chrome are okay
the linux kernel
emacs of course :)
elinks is a really good text browser
openssh
gpg

doubtless there are quite a few other things, but these are the first programs which occurred to me as being comfortably better than any similar proprietary programs.

Bachstelze
February 28th, 2010, 03:07 AM
I would add:

gcc
openssl
openvpn
MySQL
Python
PHP

which are also used by countless companies.

undecim
February 28th, 2010, 04:28 AM
Bash
RSync
Aptitude
OpenSSH
Apache
MySQL
PHP
XMind
VLC
Blender
Inkscape
KDE 4.3+

Gimp is on its way (maybe the coming UI facelift will give it a "professional" feel)

TheBuda
February 28th, 2010, 04:35 AM
GIMP

Does Open Office count? Since office 2007, I cant use use Office anymore, so I've been 99% open office.

phrostbyte
February 28th, 2010, 04:43 AM
GIMP

Does Open Office count? Since office 2007, I cant use use Office anymore, so I've been 99% open office.

I actually did a presentation recently using OOo and was very happy with the results. OOo has some really beautiful built in templates, and it has OpenGL transition effects that blow PowerPoint of the water. :) Now if only OO Writer had a good grammar check we'd be in business.

jrusso2
February 28th, 2010, 04:51 AM
In client apps not very many maybe Firefox.

blueshiftoverwatch
February 28th, 2010, 04:53 AM
NetBeans (which sort of goes along with with PHP)

sgosnell
February 28th, 2010, 04:55 AM
I would say that almost all of the software available is professional quality. I see nothing that runs on Windows that is any better.

Grammar checkers in word processors are mostly worthless. They just don't work well in English. And if you need a grammar checker, you need to learn more grammar, which should be taught in public schools but seldom is these days. The English teachers don't seem to know English grammar very well, and whoever writes the grammar checkers don't know it at all.

clanky
February 28th, 2010, 04:16 PM
In before spinning cubes

Firefox, for all of it's faults is a very high quality piece of software, which I would consider to be professional quality.

O_Oo for all its good points is too slow and the interface is too ugly to be considered as professional quality IMO.

KDE whether you happen to like it or not has at last got to the stage where it is equal to or better than anything else that is around in terms of professionalism.

Chrome to me is the same, whether or not you happen to like chrome it is a professional quality piece of software.


I would say that almost all of the software available is professional quality. I see nothing that runs on Windows that is any better.

Go and have another look at some of the junk which is in the repodsitories, are you seriously trying to suggest that MS office is not better in terms of performance than O_Oo, that Photoshop isn't a million times easier to use than GIMP, that qCAD is in the same league as AutoCAD? There are vaild reasons for people to choose these applications over the proprietary alternatives, but to claim the "almost all" open source software is of a professional quality and that there is "nothing that runs on windows that is any better" is just ridiculous.

initramdisk
February 28th, 2010, 04:25 PM
John the Ripper with jumbo patch

celem
February 28th, 2010, 05:42 PM
GRAMPS

Very polished - solid as a rock

dyslexia
February 28th, 2010, 05:49 PM
Gnome, definitely; it's awesome.

bryncoles
February 28th, 2010, 05:56 PM
R (http://cran.r-project.org/) and LaTeX (http://www.latex-project.org/), without a doubt. Ubuntu itself too I consider to be of production quality, Apache I'm lead to believe runs the intertubes, so that.

tommorris
February 28th, 2010, 10:05 PM
Vim (must remember to go and donate)
SciTE/Scintilla
PostgreSQL
Java HotSpot compiler
Mono (politics aside)
Scala language and compiler
git
mutt
rtorrent
Redmine
Xfce
GNU screen

katie-xx
March 1st, 2010, 02:33 AM
There are lots of top notch open source development tools.
Most have been mentioned already

GCC
Python
MySQl
PHP


Unfortunately, as someone else has already noted, the repositories do have some low quality apps and ..dare I say it here .....
Some of the kernel code looks as if it was written by a first year student ... this is actually acknowledged by the Linux Foundation from time to time ..but there seems to be no intention of going back to make things better!!

The fact of the matter is, for most applications, it wont be possible to produce good quality code without the benefit of a professional organisation to provide facilities. So dont be too hard on peeps who have developed small applications at their homes and managed to get them in the repos.



Kate

Queue29
March 1st, 2010, 03:19 AM
eclipse
Chrome
Firefox
Code::Blocks
Terminal Server Client

There are a number of others who have good functionality, but look and feel as though their interfaces were designed by egotistical programmers instead of real graphic designers.

katie-xx
March 1st, 2010, 03:25 AM
egotistical programmers instead of real graphic designers.

Graphic Designers ???????????????????????????????????????

Priceless


:p

Villiam
March 1st, 2010, 03:36 AM
Maya is the real film making / animation graphic designing professional software. O well it is available for linux and mac too 9along with windows). I love it. It is the industry standard at the moment. (although its not open source)

WinterMadness
March 1st, 2010, 03:49 AM
KDE 4.2 onwards are all pro quality, and is the best desktop environment on any system as far as im concerned.

K3B is the best cd burner you can get in my opinion. It not only looks nicer its just overall the best ive used.

Netbeans is amazing. Probably my favorite IDE

Firefox

Gimp is somewhat professional. I think in comparison to photoshop is not very good.

VLC is my favorite media player.

Open office could use some work i think.

swoll1980
March 1st, 2010, 04:10 AM
Blender is amazing.

Kdar
March 1st, 2010, 04:14 AM
I agree about Blender too. I find it to be best and most easy to use 3d modeling software.

I find it's menu layout to be so much easier to understand.

Primefalcon
March 1st, 2010, 04:21 AM
A lot actually.. far more than I'm going to post... so I'll just list my favs

Linux itself
Apache
Gimp
Blender
Audacity
Filezilla
Firefox
liferea
f-spot
open office
gparted
bash
evolution

SmittyJensen
March 1st, 2010, 04:57 AM
what about the old amarok (1.4)?

Frak
March 1st, 2010, 05:10 AM
llvm
clang
FreeBSD (platform as whole)
NetBSD (platform as whole)
Inkscape
Google Chrome
Webkit (I <3 Webkit)
Mono
Moonlight
Microsoft .Net Micro Framework
Flixel Engine
Appcelerator Titanium
PostgreSQL
Groovy Interpreter
Scala Interpreter

And one of my somewhat recent personal favorites:
Railo

Mr. Picklesworth
March 1st, 2010, 05:47 AM
Blender 2.6 :)

A really cool geographer gave an awesome (although quick) demo of Quantum GIS (http://www.qgis.org/) a geographic information system at the Ubuntu Vancouver meeting. It isn't a major player yet, but it's really growing in popularity and has an amazingly solid design.

Agreed that OpenOffice isn't perfection itself we shouldn't delude ourselves to that but it is definitely a better choice for a lot of businesses simply because Microsoft charges an incredible amount of money for MS Office even just individual applications. Unfortunately, the whole project feels like it's about to explode in some unexpected direction right now thanks to the whole Oracle acquisition.

Lots and lots of writers (especially math writers) use LaTeX. Maybe Lyx could fit into this jar.

Roasted
March 1st, 2010, 06:16 AM
I think if anything Oracle would choose to support OpenOffice and improve it instead of killing it off. I think it's too widely used by now, and doing anything negatively with OpenOffice would definitely gain a negative rep. Choosing to support it can only help them.

Speaking of which, I would consider OpenOffice to be of professional quality. It's on about 400 of our 1600 systems and counting. Absolutely zero issues have risen so far, except those few people who were used to the MSO 2007 layout.

I would also consider FOG to be professional grade, which I use for imaging Windows systems at work. It's worked marvelously.

Gnome - hands down.

KDE is.. ehh. I would say 4.3+ is good, but I'd still feel the need to do some intense testing prior to mass deploying KDE.

Firefox = our standard web browser at work. Very few issues.

phrostbyte
March 1st, 2010, 06:20 AM
I think if anything Oracle would choose to support OpenOffice and improve it instead of killing it off. I think it's too widely used by now, and doing anything negatively with OpenOffice would definitely gain a negative rep. Choosing to support it can only help them.

Speaking of which, I would consider OpenOffice to be of professional quality. It's on about 400 of our 1600 systems and counting. Absolutely zero issues have risen so far, except those few people who were used to the MSO 2007 layout.

I would also consider FOG to be professional grade, which I use for imaging Windows systems at work. It's worked marvelously.

Gnome - hands down.

KDE is.. ehh. I would say 4.3+ is good, but I'd still feel the need to do some intense testing prior to mass deploying KDE.

Firefox = our standard web browser at work. Very few issues.

I'm pretty sure I read on their website they they intend to "spend more money" then Sun did on OpenOffice.org and MySQL. As possible the largest "enterprise software" company, they might want to take Microsoft Office head on at some point.

WinterMadness
March 1st, 2010, 06:34 AM
I think if anything Oracle would choose to support OpenOffice and improve it instead of killing it off. I think it's too widely used by now, and doing anything negatively with OpenOffice would definitely gain a negative rep. Choosing to support it can only help them.

Speaking of which, I would consider OpenOffice to be of professional quality. It's on about 400 of our 1600 systems and counting. Absolutely zero issues have risen so far, except those few people who were used to the MSO 2007 layout.

I would also consider FOG to be professional grade, which I use for imaging Windows systems at work. It's worked marvelously.

Gnome - hands down.

KDE is.. ehh. I would say 4.3+ is good, but I'd still feel the need to do some intense testing prior to mass deploying KDE.

Firefox = our standard web browser at work. Very few issues.

have you used KDE on a non ubuntu distro?

RichardLinx
March 1st, 2010, 06:47 AM
openSUSE
KDE
Firefox
Blender
Gimp (Come on, it's pretty damn good)
Sauerbraten (The game engine, not necessarily the game)

Zoot7
March 1st, 2010, 10:29 AM
Ardour is the most prominent one that comes to mind.

clanky
March 1st, 2010, 11:00 AM
Yeah, forgot to mention Blender, definitely professional quality.

There is also a lot of very specialised software which is written for specific tasks which is professional quality, but it is not freely available.

Ralob
March 1st, 2010, 04:51 PM
XAMPP
VMWare- not open source, though Virtual-Box is
OpenSSH
Handbrake
VLC
Shutter
XBMC
K3b

DZ*
March 1st, 2010, 05:21 PM
have you used KDE on a non ubuntu distro?

I'm trying to use KDE on a Fedora 12. Since KDE had been upgraded to 4.4, it installed virtuoso, and that nepomuk/strigi thing is finally getting close to being useful. Dolphin can now instant-search content of pdf, doc, odt, odp files.

Still not quite there yet, unfortunately, since it misses things in unpredictable (to me) ways. I made a text file, then saved it as odp and as doc. Depending on which word I'm searching for, one two, or all three of these files appear in the results. some ("simple" ?) words or their combinations are not indexed at all, e.g. "brown fox".

Well, a search that misses stuff is as good as no search at all, but I'm hopeful.

Also, that virtuoso trio is rather memory hungry. I have 32 Gb on that computer, so I can take any bloat, but still it bothers me that KDE 4.4 happily takes 3.4 Gb.

weichimaster
March 1st, 2010, 06:28 PM
GNU backgammon is pretty strong.

perce
March 1st, 2010, 08:44 PM
TeX/LaTeX; it's wonderful, if you don't know it yet, try it and dump Openoffice

markbuntu
March 3rd, 2010, 12:04 AM
Terminal.
Dominating the Earth since the time of the dinosaurs and still the biggest monster out there, creating fear and horror everywhere with just the mention of its name. The old masters who created terminal where very aware of what they were doing and so combined the words terror iminent and final to name the most powerful of all creatures they were unleashing on the primitive human tribes then living in the cold dark caves of "computer rooms" buried in the basements of universities and research centers. They created a god.

These primitive cave dwelling programmers came to worship and feed this uncaring monster and, as with all religious cults, differences of dogma eventually forced division. These primitives divided into the preistly orders of programmers and sysadmins therby dividing the tasks of feeding the great god and interceding between the god and its "users".

While the scattered preistly tribe of sysadmins sought to placate the user's fear of the great god Terminal who dominated the world and kept many potyential users away in fear, it was only after the programmers adopted the dogma of GUI that reconfigured Terminal as a hidden god that the people approached the tabernacle of computing without fear. After that the religion spread far and wide more rapidly than any religion before as more and more people clamored to become users.

But these programmers were not incognizant of their worshipful obligations to the great god and, while bringing computing to the masses through the dogma of GUI, vastly increased the reach and power of their terrible god. Not every tenet of computing was approachable through GUI alone, a fact that was cleverly hidden. Eventually every user would need to come face to face with the terrible god Terminal and pay heavily for preistly intervention to avoid or mitigate catastrophe.

These days there is a cult that encourages the direct communication of the user with the god Terminal. the cult of linux. Started in Finland some years ago by a novice programmer this cult has spread widely but is considered as heretical and evangelical by the now mainstream GUI religions and so persecuted mercilessly even though the great priests of these GUI religions still worship and feed Terminal in secret.

The cult of linux has found wide approval and adoption by the great and powerful sysadmins, monks who can bring the world's greatest and most powerful corporations and governments to their knees with a few keystrokes, belonging to an order that never adopted the programmers dogma of GUI in the first place.

Terminal, the greatest and most powerful god in the pantheon of computing, the source of all that exists, the one ring that rules them all.

Richard1979
March 3rd, 2010, 12:09 AM
http://www.renoise.com/

It's not open source though, it's proprietary music creation software.
It's very professional - I paid for the Windows version about 5 or 6 years ago and I still get all software updates including the Linux version because their license allows you to get 5 or so of the next versions on every version you buy.
So, I bought version 1.5 which lets me download all up to v2.0 as much as I want.

samjh
March 3rd, 2010, 12:36 AM
Lots of stuff.

Office and productivity:
OpenOffice.org Evolution KDE PIM (KMail, Kontact, etc.) Thunderbird

Web:
Firefox Chromium

Art:
GIMP Inkscape Blender

Music and video:
VLC Amarok Banshee Songbird

Games:
Battle for Wesnoth Flightgear

Development tools:
Eclipse Netbeans KDevelop QtCreator Bluefish

Databases:
MySQL PostgreSQL

Many software libraries, and Linux itself.

sgosnell
March 3rd, 2010, 01:24 AM
Just because one package isn't the best in the world, that doesn't mean it isn't professional quality. I've seen some real junk come out of professional software companies, and I've seen superb software coming out of someone's garage. I've seen very little Linux software that I wouldn't consider professional quality, even if there are similar apps that might look better in other OS's, or provide more features.

clanky
March 3rd, 2010, 03:21 PM
I've seen superb software coming out of someone's garage.

Like what?

fugazi32
March 3rd, 2010, 03:43 PM
Ardour is the most prominent one that comes to mind.

Seconded!
:D
Even my friend who knows Logic/Cubase was rather impressed!!!

Roasted
March 3rd, 2010, 04:02 PM
have you used KDE on a non ubuntu distro?

Actually when I was flirting with KDE for a short time I went straight to Mandriva, followed by openSUSE.

It's good, don't get me wrong... but I wouldn't mass deploy it. Not yet, anyways.

chucky chuckaluck
March 3rd, 2010, 04:16 PM
Games? I'm not sure apps one uses while pretending work should be considered professional.

Warpnow
March 3rd, 2010, 04:49 PM
Now if only OO Writer had a good grammar check we'd be in business.

Meeeehhhh, Office's Grammar checker sucks, too. Alot of false positives, ie, phrases that are perfectly fine get highlighted, especially if its a story. Grammar checker is probably better for technical writing than prose, but I still find it to be bad.

clanky
March 3rd, 2010, 04:53 PM
Grammar checkers generally suffer from this, to be honest, I have always thought that you need as good a knowledge of grammar to figure out whether the grammar checker is right or wrong as to just write correct sentences in the first place.

DownTown22
March 3rd, 2010, 04:56 PM
- Gimp
- Inkscape
- Blender
- OpenOffice
- VLC
- MySQL
- Mono
- APACHE
- Linux

I'd throw in some KDE applications if they weren't ridiculously named. Just because it's a KDE application, we don't need to be forcing a 'K' into every word.

Johnsie
March 3rd, 2010, 05:08 PM
Well, I guess it depends what the person wants to so:

For me and the other the company techies:

Apache
PHP
MYSQL
Eclipse
Gedit



For the non-techies:

Firefox (some people in work just call it 'Mozilla')


The non-techies wont touch OOO at all because they like Excel and Outlook (usually the even have a specific version that that that they like and complain if you change them away from that). The techies would use Open Office sometimes but the GUI's in Microsoft Office look alot better.

Evolution is close to Outlook but IMO isn't as professional looking. I wouldn't even dare to make anyone use it instead of Outlook.


Things that I think need to be improved to get more people using Open Source in the workplace:

Better GUI, similar to what people are used to
Proper Exchange support in Evolution (not just checking every 10 minutes)
Better colour schemes
Better training schemes for people to learn how to use and get failiar with open source software.

The main thing I've noticed in the Office environment is that people don't like change, because they are in their comfort zones. For them using a computer alone is a struggle and just getting to where they are now was difficult for them. Learning something new will make them struggle even more.



Ps. I've done some experiments, making some computers in work dual-boot and the users wont even boot into Ubuntu because they are afraid of Linux and not knowing what to do.

rahilm
March 3rd, 2010, 06:06 PM
Firefox - best browser on earth (at the time of writing)
Gedit
Blender
Gimp
Rhythmbox
Banshee
Geany
VLC
Mplayer
ffmpeg
GNU Core Utilities
XBMC
Gparted
Deluge (i'm loving it!!)
OOo
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
etc
.
.
.
.
.
.
etc
.
.
.
.
GNOME
Linux

bunburya
March 3rd, 2010, 06:08 PM
Despite what has been said about OpenOffice I have to say I do think it is of professional quality. Even if it doesn't quite beat MS Word in all respects that doesn't mean it isn't of professional quality. And the few times I have used OOCalc I have had a better experience than MS Excel.

Similarly I think GIMP is up there as well. Again it's not as good as Photoshop but I think it's beter than the vast majority of other proprietary image editors out there.

clanky
March 3rd, 2010, 07:34 PM
Despite what has been said about OpenOffice I have to say I do think it is of professional quality. Even if it doesn't quite beat MS Word in all respects that doesn't mean it isn't of professional quality. And the few times I have used OOCalc I have had a better experience than MS Excel.

Similarly I think GIMP is up there as well. Again it's not as good as Photoshop but I think it's beter than the vast majority of other proprietary image editors out there.

Yes on calc, but to me the rest of OOo isn't quite there in terms of what I would think of as the necessary polish for something to be considered professional quality.

GIMP, hmmmmmm, in terms of functionality yes, but the interface lets it down, to me it is almost there, but needs to be more user friendly.