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Akatsuki26
February 5th, 2010, 12:07 PM
This is what I enter in terminal: (I want to install flashplayer)

"myname"@ubuntu:~$ sudo aptitude install ubuntu-restricted-extras
[sudo] password for "myname": (I entered my password here)
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information... Done
Reading extended state information
Initializing package states... Done
Couldn't find any package whose name or description matched "ubuntu-restricted-extras"
Couldn't find any package whose name or description matched "ubuntu-restricted-extras"
No packages will be installed, upgraded, or removed.
0 packages upgraded, 0 newly installed, 0 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
Need to get 0B of archives. After unpacking 0B will be used.
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information... Done
Reading extended state information
Initializing package states... Done

What am I doing here?

Thanks!

dvlchd3
February 5th, 2010, 12:13 PM
The ubuntu-restricted-extras package is in the multiverse repository. Make sure you have that enabled in your sources.list file.

Can you find the package by searching in Synaptic package manager?

Akatsuki26
February 5th, 2010, 12:18 PM
Where can I find my sources.list file? Thanks.

also, another question. I looked in the Software Center and found Ubuntu Restricted Areas.

When I click on it, it's written "Not available in the current data"!

Can anyone help?

capybara!
February 5th, 2010, 12:24 PM
Your sources.list should be here:
/etc/apt/sources.list

Open it with some editor, for example
sudo emacs /etc/apt/sources.list

Then add something like

deb http://nl.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ hardy multiverse
deb-src http://nl.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ hardy multiverse
deb http://nl.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ hardy-updates multiverse
deb-src http://nl.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ hardy-updates multiverse

to the file

and maybe change "hardy" to whatever version you have and change "nl." to "com." or something like that, depending on the country you are in.

Hope this helps...

anaconda
February 5th, 2010, 12:24 PM
/etc/apt/sources.list

YOu can edit it with eg:
gksudo gedit /etc/apt/sources.list

And after editing it
you need to update your apt-data by:
sudo apt-get update

PS. you can also do all of this graphically by using
System>Administration>Synaptic package manager

crazy_fox
February 5th, 2010, 12:25 PM
sources.list is in /etc/apt/sources.list

You should not try to edit this manually if you are new or not willing to mess you system in order to learn.

Which version of ubuntu are you running?
If you are in 9.10, open Ubuntu Software Centre and search for "restricted".

toogooda
February 5th, 2010, 12:30 PM
Hey Buddy,

You need two things
first have you selected all the sources for apt that are listed System->software Sources esp restricted on first tab and canonical on second tab. this tells ubuntu where to look,
Second update

sudo apt-get updatethen is should find it ok

Cheers AT

Fred2a
February 5th, 2010, 12:31 PM
Go to System -> Administration -> Software Sources (or Sources - I can't remember exactly)

I think the 2nd tab has the repository lists put check marks in the Multiverse repo.

Save/Reload data and you should now be able to install using either Software Centre or Terminal or Synaptic - whichever is your preference.

audiomick
February 5th, 2010, 12:34 PM
sources.list is in /etc/apt/sources.list

You should not try to edit this manually if you are new or not willing to mess you system in order to learn.

Which version of ubuntu are you running?
If you are in 9.10, open Ubuntu Software Centre and search for "restricted".
My thoughts exactly.

Another fairly safe GUI route is the synaptic package manager in system> administration. In that, there is an option under "preferences" for setting up you package sources.

"Fairly safe" is still relative. There is less chance of saving garbage to your package list, or even accidently erasing it entirely, but of course you can still tell the application to remove packages that are existential to the computer.

houseworkshy
February 5th, 2010, 12:34 PM
There is a new and quick way of doing this. It's called an apt:url. If you go here https://help.ubuntu.com/ and go through the guide for your version of Ubuntu one of the links will do it for you. It's quite a nice feature for a new comers quick start as at the end of the guide one will not only have a very basic overview but have video/sound/flash etc sorted out too.
As an aside because you will be asked for your password and will effectively be in an admin mode for a while ( fifteen minuets) don't have the browser open elsewhere. Whilst this new feature is easy and fast to use nor have I heard of any problems with it (if one can't trust Ubuntu.com who can one trust?) I feel strangely nervous about its' potential. I think trusted pages only and not browsing elsewhere during the fifteen minuets grace sudo period may become the standard advice in years to come so may as well start with good habits now.

After that this book, the pdf download is free.

http://www.ubuntupocketguide.com/index_main.html

Superb short overview, and IMO deserves a place in anyones documents. Got me started and I still refer to it occasionally.

sisco311
February 5th, 2010, 12:37 PM
The ubuntu-restricted-extras package is in the multiverse repository. Make sure you have that enabled in your sources.list file.



Yep, it's in the multiverse repo.

The fastest way to enable the repo & install the package is:

sudo software-properties-gtk -e multiverse
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install ubuntu-restricted-extras

apochry
June 30th, 2010, 01:13 PM
Just wanted to say THANKS!