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Wink2tall
February 3rd, 2010, 02:09 PM
I was just curious as to the point of an email client on your computer when their are internet based options like gmail and yahoo. Maybe I am missing something because I never used one before. If there is something I am missing, please point it out to me lol.

Excedio
February 3rd, 2010, 02:15 PM
I was just curious as to the point of an email client on your computer when their are internet based options like gmail and yahoo. Maybe I am missing something because I never used one before. If there is something I am missing, please point it out to me lol.

For me:

The ability to customize Thunderbird to my liking.
I can work on emails offline (I know that gmail allows this, but Yahoo does not).
Thunderbird allows me to create a signature using HTML, thus making it completely..me.
Filters. (Yahoo only allows for paid accounts)
The ability to have emails from multiple accounts go to one centralized location. I could use email forwarding, but Thunderbird makes the process much less time consuming.

infestor
February 3rd, 2010, 03:48 PM
if you dont work in an office for me they are pointless. we used to use outlook for conference room bookings and arranging meetings

Dragonbite
February 3rd, 2010, 04:04 PM
I like the lack of ads
Access to emails while not connected to the net
Access to contacts while not connected to the net
Ability to back-up emails and contacts
Ability to not lose old emails and clients if moving to a new email service
Combined email and contact view with Thunderbird & Lightning or Evolution
Ability to add Add-Ons to the client
Not page caching, accidental navigation clicks and such
Multiple email accounts (different providers even) in one single client which provides
one point of reference
can share rules and filters
can group like purposes, sources or any other organization regardless of which email it comes from
all without having to have cascading forwarding
no Firefox vs IE vs Opera vs Konquerer vs ..?.. which may or may not be supported or renders differently

pwnst*r
February 3rd, 2010, 04:35 PM
if you dont work in an office for me they are pointless. we used to use outlook for conference room bookings and arranging meetings

^this.

Wink2tall
February 3rd, 2010, 05:03 PM
Definitely some point I didn't think of. Thanks for a new view. Still love my gmail though, lol.

coolbrook
February 3rd, 2010, 05:30 PM
13. Not wanting to promote @gmail, @hotmail, @yahoo
14. IMAP is cool.
15. The good old Outbox vs. Sent Items folder. Scheduling sent messages and delaying them so they're not immediately sent after clicking 'send'. Perhaps that's an option in webmail these days.

Roasted
February 3rd, 2010, 05:35 PM
I have several email accounts, one for junk, one for professional contacts, etc. It's convenient having Thunderbird tie them all together. Not to mention it's much quicker to open Thunderbird than it is to open Firefox - then Gmail - etc. Small differences, but enough to warrant Thunderbird usage, both at work and at home.

aysiu
February 3rd, 2010, 05:38 PM
I have several reasons for using an email client (Thunderbird, if you want to know which one): I have multiple email accounts, so it helps me manage them all in one place. Some of my email accounts have very slow web interfaces. I can sort thousands of messages almost instantly. It's easy to make local backups of emails. It's easy to reply to an email message in one account using another account or to move a message from one email account to another.

Dragonbite
February 3rd, 2010, 05:50 PM
I set up the family with Thunderbird (actually, just my wife) so that when I moved her from Windows to Linux (and probably back to Windows soon) the application will be consistent since it is cross-platform.

Plus I have her personal email account forward into a Gmail account which is IMAPed to the email client. This way regardless of which system she is on (laptop or desktop) all of her email and contacts (Google Contact sync) are accessible.

For myself, though, I usually hop between Evolution or Thunderbird (I like the latest Thunderbird.. pretty sweet) plus I can access it via the web interface when I am at work.

madnessjack
February 3rd, 2010, 05:58 PM
Emails are treated like files. And I hate web apps. :P

Uncle Spellbinder
February 3rd, 2010, 06:02 PM
I HATE using webmail. I much prefer having it all in one place via a client. In my case, Thunderbird. Far easier to navigate and no adds or idiotic chat windows.

pwnst*r
February 3rd, 2010, 06:17 PM
I like not having to worry about backing up my emails, so webmail for me.

aysiu
February 3rd, 2010, 06:21 PM
I like not having to worry about backing up my emails, so webmail for me.
Can you clarify that a bit?

Why would you have to worry about backing up emails when using an email client?

lisati
February 3rd, 2010, 06:27 PM
I have several email accounts. When I was on dial-up, downloading all the messages into one place helped save time and freed up the phone line while I was reading incoming mail and composing replies. Having everything in one place can also make life easier when forwarding spam to a reporting service such as Spamcop (http://spamcop.net).

Dragonbite
February 3rd, 2010, 07:12 PM
I like not having to worry about backing up my emails, so webmail for me.

IMAP! That way, if you (in a client) move an email from one folder into another it is that way. When you, later on, open your webmail in a browser the file is still in the folder you moved it to.

IMAP is almost like remote-controlling your webmail, but better.

pwnst*r
February 3rd, 2010, 07:19 PM
IMAP! That way, if you (in a client) move an email from one folder into another it is that way. When you, later on, open your webmail in a browser the file is still in the folder you moved it to.

IMAP is almost like remote-controlling your webmail, but better.

Good to know, but I still don't have a use for a client.

speedwell68
February 3rd, 2010, 07:37 PM
I like not having to worry about backing up my emails, so webmail for me.

Backing up email is a doddle. I just backup my entire Thunderbird folder, profile and all, it takes seconds. If your webmail provider goes down then you won't have access to your existing mail.

pwnst*r
February 3rd, 2010, 07:49 PM
Backing up email is a doddle. I just backup my entire Thunderbird folder, profile and all, it takes seconds. If your webmail provider goes down then you won't have access to your existing mail.

Google's HDD's (for example) are more reliable than your own.

Tibuda
February 3rd, 2010, 07:59 PM
If your webmail provider goes down then you won't have access to your existing mail.

You can open Gmail offline using Gears (gears.google.com). Indeed I think Gmail have all those features people have listed for mail clients. You can block ads with AdBlock, you can use it to centralize all your mail accounts, you can install addons...

I don't use mail clients because none of them can group the messages in threads like Gmail does (no, it is not the same as Thunderbird threads).

aysiu
February 3rd, 2010, 08:06 PM
You can open Gmail offline using Gears (gears.google.com). Indeed I think Gmail have all those features people have listed for mail clients. You can block ads with AdBlock, you can use it to centralize all your mail accounts, you can install addons... It's not really the same thing. If you centralize your other accounts using GMail, you have to use POP with those and not IMAP.

Tibuda
February 3rd, 2010, 08:09 PM
It's not really the same thing. If you centralize your other accounts using GMail, you have to use POP with those and not IMAP.

True, but IMAP have benefits over POP only if you are using a standalone client, but not if using Gmail.

I mean IMAP is useful if you want to sync mail clients in multiple computers. You don't need this if you are using a web interface.

EDIT: And if you want IMAP for a mail client, you could use this scheme:

work mail ----POP----> Gmail <----IMAP----> mail client

aysiu
February 3rd, 2010, 08:20 PM
True, but IMAP have benefits over POP only if you are using a standalone client, but not if using Gmail.

I mean IMAP is useful if you want to sync mail clients in multiple computers. You don't need this if you are using a web interface.

EDIT: And if you want IMAP for a mail client, you could use this scheme:

work mail ----POP----> Gmail <----IMAP----> mail client But then if you download all the POP messages into GMail, that leaves you no other option. What if you later decide "Eh, I don't dig GMail so much any more"? Then all those downloaded messages will be stuck in GMail. Sure, you can get them out, but that's annoying.

With IMAP and an email client, I can have all my accounts in one place, and if I decide "Eh, I don't dig GMail so much any more," I can just delete it off the list email accounts, and all my other accounts will function perfectly.

Incidentally, with GMail specifically, I remember there was some outage a while back for a couple of hours... the outage was for GMail via webmail. Those using GMail through an email client didn't experience the outage at all.

Tibuda
February 3rd, 2010, 08:34 PM
But then if you download all the POP messages into GMail, that leaves you no other option. What if you later decide "Eh, I don't dig GMail so much any more"? Then all those downloaded messages will be stuck in GMail. Sure, you can get them out, but that's annoying.

With IMAP and an email client, I can have all my accounts in one place, and if I decide "Eh, I don't dig GMail so much any more," I can just delete it off the list email accounts, and all my other accounts will function perfectly.
This is true.


Incidentally, with GMail specifically, I remember there was some outage a while back for a couple of hours... the outage was for GMail via webmail. Those using GMail through an email client didn't experience the outage at all.
I remember this incident. The IMAP server was working fine, but the HTTP server was down. I think it was possible to open Gmail in offline mode, but it could not send and receive messages. I have installed Thunderbird that day.

aysiu
February 3rd, 2010, 08:36 PM
Well, the bottom line is that it's all a matter of preference.

If someone likes webmail and it works for her, cool.

It doesn't work for me. I prefer an email client.

Dragonbite
February 3rd, 2010, 09:08 PM
Google's HDD's (for example) are more reliable than your own.

Yeah, that's why I prefer keeping my email on Google's redundant hard drives and systems and connect via IMAP. It's good enough for me really.

pwnst*r
February 3rd, 2010, 09:30 PM
I remember this incident. The IMAP server was working fine, but the HTTP server was down. I think it was possible to open Gmail in offline mode, but it could not send and receive messages. I have installed Thunderbird that day.

Except for most people it wasn't a huge deal because it wasn't critical.

scouser73
February 3rd, 2010, 10:50 PM
I have several reasons for using an email client (Thunderbird, if you want to know which one): I have multiple email accounts, so it helps me manage them all in one place. Some of my email accounts have very slow web interfaces. I can sort thousands of messages almost instantly. It's easy to make local backups of emails. It's easy to reply to an email message in one account using another account or to move a message from one email account to another.

+1, to me Thunderbird is a necessity for emailing.

teet
February 3rd, 2010, 11:42 PM
I've pretty much ditched thunderbird for the gmail web interface.

I have 3 email accounts. My 10 year old hotmail account for when I have to sign up for stuff on somewhat sketchy website, a windows live account associated with my school email, and my gmail account. I forward my hotmail account to the windows live account. I then have all my windows live mail redirected to gmail (I get this option since it's a *.edu account).

Using gmail's advanced filters, I sort out all my mail into "hotmail", "windows live", and regular old "gmail" tags. It's really pretty sweet.

-teet

Wink2tall
February 6th, 2010, 11:28 PM
Wow never thought this would stir up such a conversation lol. A great one at that. I guess since I only have 1 account Gmail had just seemed the way to go for me but I can definitely see the benefit of Thunderbird if you have a few more to manage.

Thanks!
-Wink