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View Full Version : Should Cannonical/Ubuntu buy a Superbowl TV Ad?



frogotronic
January 24th, 2010, 10:28 PM
Well, something to get people to think about Ubuntu? Get the "word" out?

Thoughts?

- CH

:-k

loopcoop
January 24th, 2010, 10:57 PM
If more people even knew there was a third option... macs are too expensive and MS is too annoying, someone should tell them.

marin123
January 24th, 2010, 11:09 PM
look at the other side... people are trying to learn ms/mac for years now, and finally when theyre starting to get it, you want them to start this all over again? :D

i think linux should be more advertised but among students and people who can get they way around computers.. if you force linux advertising, youre no better than ms...
people should use what suits them best... if you like linux, good for you, but dont force it or youre no better than ms...
in my opinion linux is jack of all trades, but ms has few advantages (thousands of programmers who develop apps for ms, i.e. cell phone flashing apps or games).. everything else, ms thumb down, linux two thumbs up :)

HoboElectus
January 24th, 2010, 11:15 PM
If you listen carefully, you can hear the sound of Shuttleworth going bankrupt.

AllRadioisDead
January 24th, 2010, 11:15 PM
Personally I don't think Ubuntu is ready to go mainstream.

doorknob60
January 24th, 2010, 11:25 PM
Eh, maybe in a few years. I don't think Ubuntu is quite ready for people that have to go to Geek Squad to install printer drivers and antiviruses yet... :P Yes there's people like that, unfortunately. Would be a good idea to do sometime in the future though. Would have to be a good ad though.

SuperSonic4
January 24th, 2010, 11:32 PM
It reminds me of an episode of Futurama where Professor Farnsworth pays to have a commerical aired during the superbowl but "not on the same channel of course" :p

wearyroad
January 24th, 2010, 11:34 PM
Eh, maybe in a few years. I don't think Ubuntu is quite ready for people that have to go to Geek Squad to install printer drivers and antiviruses yet... :P Yes there's people like that, unfortunately. Would be a good idea to do sometime in the future though. Would have to be a good ad though.

I agree, but linux needs more programmers. If we advertised, then at least it would be out there, possibly make a stir in the computer industry, and get people interested again.

kabloink
January 24th, 2010, 11:46 PM
If you listen carefully, you can hear the sound of Shuttleworth going bankrupt.

Similar to those dot.com businesses that blew most of their funding on Superbowl ads in the late 90s. We all know what happened to most of them.

gutterslob
January 25th, 2010, 12:00 AM
It might work if they can afford to pay Janet Jackson

Dayofswords
January 25th, 2010, 12:02 AM
you know a 30 second ad cost 1+ million USD right?

ibm should replay this ad
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwL0G9wK8j4

Xbehave
January 25th, 2010, 12:54 AM
I agree, but linux needs more programmers. If we advertised, then at least it would be out there, possibly make a stir in the computer industry, and get people interested again.
I think Linux has most of the geeks already, if not they have all at least heard of it. Ads might make Linux more mainstream but all that will bring is prop apps and better driver support, I think Linux already has most of the useful users it's going to get!

mrebanza
January 25th, 2010, 01:36 AM
not unless they make one of these

blueshiftoverwatch
January 25th, 2010, 01:59 AM
If someone's not tech savvy enough to have heard of Linux and seek it out on their own. They're not tech savvy enough to run it. After a superbowl ad the forums would be DDOS'd by people asking "why won't this .exe file run?".

aysiu
January 25th, 2010, 03:39 AM
What are they advertising?

"Go out and buy a Ubuntu computer at Dell... ignore the part about Dell recommending Windows 7"

or

"Go to our website and download an .iso, burn it to CD, set your BIOS to boot from CD, repartition your drive, install Ubuntu, and then troubleshoot any potential hardware incompatibilities."

Advertising is for products people can buy.

coolbrook
January 25th, 2010, 07:34 AM
Another thing to take into consideration is the timing of it all. It doesn't seem like much use to advertise in the first week of February when the LTS/spring version is released in the last week of April.

It's not a bad suggestion. There could be a joint effort featuring some of the main distros in the same commercial.

Icehuck
January 25th, 2010, 07:36 AM
They would spend over 1 million dollars for an advertisement that won't earn them even 1/2 that. Seems kinda pointless to me.

For some perspective - 30 seconds of advertising time during the 2010 telecast is expected to cost US $3.01 million.

Source (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_Bowl_advertising)

ankspo71
January 25th, 2010, 08:06 AM
I had to say no to the superbowl ad. gazillions of people might flock to get ubuntu, then there would be bandwidth problems for a month or more. Superbowl ads are very steep in price, probably much more than cannonical makes in a certain period of time. It might be better for them to have a magazine ad or something. They could target a certain crowd that way, plus the ad would last longer (at least a month compared to only 30 seconds)

A superbowl ad might put too much pressure on the ubuntu dev team too, because of the huge amount of complaints/bugs coming in, and the short 6 month release schedules.

HangukMiguk
January 25th, 2010, 09:19 AM
This is NOT their target audience.

k64
January 25th, 2010, 09:23 AM
Criticize Shuttleworth all you want, but Silber ('http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/184972/canonical_ceo_steps_aside.html') is staying alive and well.

frogotronic
January 25th, 2010, 12:58 PM
What are they advertising?

"Go out and buy a Ubuntu computer at Dell... ignore the part about Dell recommending Windows 7"

or

"Go to our website and download an .iso, burn it to CD, set your BIOS to boot from CD, repartition your drive, install Ubuntu, and then troubleshoot any potential hardware incompatibilities."

Advertising is for products people can buy.


Relief efforts for Haiti are not a product you can buy. Advertising is not about selling. This is a HUGE misconception. Advertising is about creating desire, and want. Google advertises its DROID not because its going to recoup the money from the advertising, but it advertises to create the desire to have the object. Then, the desire spreads and people buy the phone. Yes, they will likely recoup their money eventually, but not immediately.

If people don't know about Linux, how can they choose it?

BTW: Not everyone who watches US football is illiterate - consider most people in that audience have sophisticated smart phones.

Anyway, I think Ubuntu should try **some** kind of organised approach to advertising.

- CH

Swagman
January 25th, 2010, 01:01 PM
They had their chance with BrawnGP and blew it.

BrawnGP were practically sponsorless and went on to win World Constructors championship 2009.

I did an F1 Mock-up... It's somewhere on here.

aysiu
January 25th, 2010, 05:53 PM
Relief efforts for Haiti are not a product you can buy. Sure it is. If everyone who wanted to contribute to relief efforts in Haiti had to actually go to Haiti and provide relief, there wouldn't be much relief.

By making it easy (just text this number to donate to the Red Cross, for example), you are essentially advertising a product. The product isn't a physical item you purchased, but it is something easy you can do.

There is no point in advertising Ubuntu if there is no easy way people can use it (install it myself... or possibly find a vendor to preinstall it but not really support it).


If people don't know about Linux, how can they choose it? Easy. You make a product people can buy that has Linux on it, like a Droid or a Hero or a Nexus. What percentage of Android phone users have any idea what Linux is? You're not saying "Hey, take this weird software and hack your way onto a Windows Mobile device." You're saying "Here. Buy this device." Make it easy for folks.


Anyway, I think Ubuntu should try **some** kind of organised approach to advertising. I do too. And that should include providing an easy way for people to use Ubuntu. If the primary way to use Ubuntu is to download, burn, install, configure, and troubleshoot it yourself, that's not worth advertising.

Xbehave
January 25th, 2010, 06:45 PM
* DROID is Motorola not google
* Using Google is a terrible example, they do very little advertising, they got to #1 simply by being the best
* Advertising without a plan is a sure fire way to burn your way through cash
* Cannonicals plan to make a profit is simple
1) Become a popular linux distro
2) Support small/medium companies when they switch to ubuntu (often because they are recomended it by an insider (see 1)
So for a $1M advert to be worth it it will have to pull in a lot of contracts, advertisings isn't magic it goes on a balance sheet like everything else.

pricetech
January 25th, 2010, 07:14 PM
Advertising IS about selling. Yes you are trying to create a desire, or convince someone that your particular whatsit is precisely the one that will solve their problem, make them happy, whatever, but ultimately it is about selling something.

Aysiu is correct, but the Haitian relief effort advertisements are called Public Service Announcements. It's something the media does to foster good will, not generate advertising revenue.

However, I would consider the cost of an ad during the superbowl to be a huge waste of money and I'd question the wisdom of such a frivolous expenditure.

Do we need to get the word out ? Sure we do, "we" being the operative word. That's a big part of what the Open Source movement is about. WE need to get the word out and be willing to help newcomers learn, as long as they are willing to help themselves.

Ylon
January 25th, 2010, 07:31 PM
1$million ads?


use first 0.5$million to buy assembled netebook, sell them half the price costs to you. (many machine sends + 0.25$milion in your pocket+still 0.5$milion)

Wait...

use last 0.75$million to buy (new) assembled netebooks, sell them 3/4 of the price costs you (other machine sends, still 0,56$milion in your pocket


use remain 0,50$milion to buy machines and sell at the same price cost to you.. in loop (use 0,06$milion to manage etc.) until ends.


EDIT: all machine with ubuntu preinstallated+ 1 usb flash which offer about other 3~4 distro to choice.

whiskeylover
January 25th, 2010, 07:42 PM
use remain 0,50$milion to buy machines and sell at the same price cost to you.. in loop (use 0,06$milion to manage etc.) until ends.


And what would this accomplish?

m4tic
January 25th, 2010, 07:47 PM
1$million ads?


use first 0.5$million to buy assembled netebook, sell them half the price costs to you. (many machine sends + 0.25$milion in your pocket+still 0.5$milion)

Wait...

use last 0.75$million to buy (new) assembled netebooks, sell them 3/4 of the price costs you (other machine sends, still 0,56$milion in your pocket


use remain 0,50$milion to buy machines and sell at the same price cost to you.. in loop (use 0,06$milion to manage etc.) until ends.


EDIT: all machine with ubuntu preinstallated+ 1 usb flash which offer about other 3~4 distro to choice.

I dont get you

fatcrab
January 25th, 2010, 07:53 PM
Criticize Shuttleworth all you want, but Silber (http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/184972/canonical_ceo_steps_aside.html) is staying alive and well.

???

aysiu
January 25th, 2010, 07:56 PM
And what would this accomplish?
A better use of millions of dollars than advertising Ubuntu at the Superbowl.

LowSky
January 25th, 2010, 08:02 PM
If no one knows of your product no one will use your product, and Canonical is going to need a lot of money for just 30 seconds of airtime, the Superbowl is the most expensive yet largest reaching audience.

If Canonical wants to be taken seriously then maybe a few ads will help sell to businesses and all the while sparking general public interest too. But the Superbowl is too crazy, best place would be cable or internet ads.

whiskeylover
January 25th, 2010, 08:04 PM
A better use of millions of dollars than advertising Ubuntu at the Superbowl.

Seriously?

You mean to tell me that people would flock to buy netbooks preloaded with Ubuntu just because they're the same cost as elsewhere?


Even assuming that Cannonical discounts each notebook by, say, US $200 (anything less than that wont result in any mad rush to buy Ubuntu loaded computers), thats still only 5000 computers. And most of them would be bought by the Linux community. Say, 10% of those go towards new Linux users. Thats around 100 new users.

So you mean to say that Cannonical spends a million dollars on this campaign, and only manages to get 100 new users and that accomplishes something?

I'm no business major, and these are only my opinions, nothing else.

Edit: 500, not 100.

mikeannike
January 25th, 2010, 08:06 PM
I personally think that ubuntu should take the money that they would spend on a superbowl ad and use it for smaller advertisements. I don't think ubuntu is ready to put all of that money up for a superbowl ad. But then again everyone in a America will be watching. Either way i support it.

aysiu
January 25th, 2010, 08:07 PM
Seriously?

You mean to tell me that people would flock to buy netbooks preloaded with Ubuntu just because they're the same cost as elsewhere?


Even assuming that Cannonical discounts each notebook by, say, US $200 (anything less than that wont result in any mad rush to buy Ubuntu loaded computers), thats still only 5000 computers. And most of them would be bought by the Linux community. Say, 10% of those go towards new Linux users. Thats around 100 new users.

So you mean to say that Cannonical spends a million dollars on this campaign, and only manages to get 100 new users and that accomplishes something?

I'm no business major, and these are only my opinions, nothing else. I think they're both useless endeavors, but at least the people who get the computers preloaded would have a good Ubuntu experience.

All the previously Linux-ignorant Superbowl watchers who tried to download the .iso but couldn't get it to work will just think Linux is a piece of crap and never want to try it again.

Better use of money doesn't mean good use of money. Better is a relative term. Giving away a few thousand Linux-preloaded laptops, bad idea. Advertising Ubuntu at the Superbowl, terrible idea. Both bad ideas, but one is a better idea than the other.

alexfish
January 25th, 2010, 08:11 PM
Well, something to get people to think about Ubuntu? Get the "word" out?

Thoughts?

- CH

:-k

1. What is Superbowl
2. How can I get Superbowl

lykwydchykyn
January 25th, 2010, 08:22 PM
I don't think advertising in general would be a waste, but advertising during the superbowl would.

First, if you're going to start running ads why start with the most expensive, generalized commercial time on earth? The same money could buy a lot more regular advertising in more targetted channels.

Second, I may be wrong but I'd bet the Superbowl audience is primarily USA. I think the US market is a waste of time for Canonical and other Linux vendors. I'd spend my money on Europe, Africa and Asia, where there is demonstrated interest in FOSS and other non-Microsoft solutions.

ankspo71
January 25th, 2010, 08:36 PM
I think the US market is a waste of time for Canonical and other Linux vendors. I'd spend my money on Europe, Africa and Asia, where there is demonstrated interest in FOSS and other non-Microsoft solutions.

I have shown a few of my US friends my Ubuntu setup, and they keep on assuming it's not as good as Windows or Mac because they have never heard of it being mentioned in the media before. Sadly, the media has that much affect on people over here. Microsoft and Mac (as well as manufactures like HP and Dell) advertise all the time over here in the US. I would like to see a small advertisement outside of the Linux magazines for once, where some non Linux users would take some interest. Even an ad or an editorial in a newspaper would be nice for a change. :P In my opinion, it doesn't have to be Ubuntu. I would be happy to see any Linux get the spotlight.

I just saw that you are in the US too. It surprises me that you would want to have the advertisements elsewhere, but you do make a good point, it probably would be a better audience for the money being spent.

cariboo
January 25th, 2010, 08:50 PM
I don't know about the rest of the world, but when the Superbowl is televised here in Canada, we don't see the big money advertisements, as most of the advertisers don't pay to have them aired all over North America, let alone the rest of the world.

doublewitt
January 25th, 2010, 09:02 PM
I know that some businesses thrive incredibly without big cost advertising - word-of-mouth is attributed to their success.

So for me, big cost advertising is a [-X
There is too much risk involved...
Talk about Ubuntu - spread the word...
Just be a big mouth...! - till someone tells you to shut up :lolflag:

lykwydchykyn
January 25th, 2010, 09:04 PM
I just saw that you are in the US too. It surprises me that you would want to have the advertisements elsewhere, but you do make a good point, it probably would be a better audience for the money being spent.

It's just business. The US is an entrenched market, and on top of that we're major entertainment consumers which presents a bit of a problem for Linux adoption (read: commercial games, DRM-controlled media, Silverlight, etc). Developing markets, or places like the EU where legislation has leveled the playing field a bit, are just a better investment.

Would I like to see more uptake in the US? Sure, but I'd rather see Linux vendors making money in more realistic markets. There will be that much more funding and that much better a product when they do decide to take a crack at the US market.

Warpnow
January 25th, 2010, 09:08 PM
Something I googled told me it cost 2.7 million for a 30 second super bowl advertisement. Think of what they could do with 2.7 million dollars. I think that money would be better invested into getting ubuntu PCs into stores like wal-mart, where they could actually make their money back.

That said, down the road, a super bowl ad may be a great idea.

forrestcupp
January 25th, 2010, 09:09 PM
What are they advertising?

"Go out and buy a Ubuntu computer at Dell... ignore the part about Dell recommending Windows 7"

or

"Go to our website and download an .iso, burn it to CD, set your BIOS to boot from CD, repartition your drive, install Ubuntu, and then troubleshoot any potential hardware incompatibilities."

Advertising is for products people can buy.
+1

People buy a Mac computer, go home, turn it on, and use it.

People buy a Windows PC computer, go home, turn it on, and use it.

For people to use Ubuntu, they still have to buy a computer that doesn't have anything to do with Ubuntu. Then they have to download Ubuntu and burn the iso using the OS already on the computer that is already perfectly usable. Then they have to decide whether they want to install it over the default OS or alongside it...

Plus, what return does Canonical get from their investment of over $1 million for a commercial slot?

LowSky
January 25th, 2010, 09:23 PM
I know that some businesses thrive incredibly without big cost advertising - word-of-mouth is attributed to their success.

So for me, big cost advertising is a [-X
There is too much risk involved...
Talk about Ubuntu - spread the word...
Just be a big mouth...! - till someone tells you to shut up :lolflag:

Name 5 large companies that have thrived on just word of mouth? Your local pizza place doesn't count. Without any advertisement no business thrives, yes word of mouth is a form but its much slower and reaches the fewest people, no large company has ever made it on word of mouth alone. To even suggest it as the best option is horrible advice. I hope you don't have a degree in Marketing or Business.

lykwydchykyn
January 25th, 2010, 09:27 PM
Name 5 large companies that have thrived on just word of mouth? Your local pizza place doesn't count. Without any advertisement no business thrives, yes word of mouth is a form but its much slower and reaches the fewest people, no large company has ever made it on word of mouth alone. To even suggest it as the best option is horrible advice. I hope you don't have a degree in Marketing or Business.

When I worked for Starbuck's back in 2002, they *claimed* they had built the business to its then-current level without ever doing a real, honest-to-goodness advertising campaign, e.g. primarily on grass-roots word-of-mouth advertising. I cannot vouch for the truth of that, that's just what corporate told us.

Can we count that as one?

aysiu
January 25th, 2010, 09:31 PM
Name 5 large companies that have thrived on just word of mouth? Your local pizza place doesn't count. Without any advertisement no business thrives, yes word of mouth is a form but its much slower and reaches the fewest people, no large company has ever made it on word of mouth alone. To even suggest it as the best option is horrible advice. I hope you don't have a degree in Marketing or Business.
From An interview with Al Ries, Best-Selling Author of "The Fall of Advertising & The Rise of PR." (http://www.tvaproductions.com/article/advertising-vs-pr---17.php):
Steve: In your book the Fall of Advertising & The Rise of PR you state that today's major brands are born with publicity - not advertising...
Al Ries: Yes, all the recent brand successes have been PR successes, not advertising successes. Red Bull, Starbucks, Harry Potter, Linux, Palm, The Body Shop, JetBlue, and Google.
Steve: Examples?
Al: Starbucks spent less than $10 million in advertising its first 10 years. That's less than one million a year, a trivial amount for a national brand. Here's what Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks, has to say about advertising. "It is difficult to launch a product through consumer advertising because customers don't really pay attention as they did in the past. I look at the money spent on advertising and it surprises me that people still believe they are getting returns on their investments."
The Body Shop is a worldwide brand that has never advertised. Instead, Anita Roddick travels the world looking for ingredients for her natural cosmetics, creating many publicity opportunities. Actually The Body Shop needs to do what Botox has done. Shift from a PR mode to an advertising mode. (Ms. Roddick was recently fired because sales have stagnated at The Body Shop.)
The fastest-growing retail chain in the world is Zara, headquartered in Spain and now operating in 27 different countries. As a matter of fact, their tags show the price of their merchandise in 27 different currencies. Zara does no advertising except for two sale ads a year.
JetBlue is flying high, primarily because of PR. The October 14, 2002 issue of Forbes, referred to them as "Lord of the Skies."
PlayStation and PlayStation 2 were introduced with a fanfare of publicity and went on to become the leading video-game brand.
Microsoft Xbox followed the same pattern. As a matter of fact, 75 percent of the target audience expressed an "interest to buy" before the first Xbox ad ran.
Linux has not advertised because no one owns the brand. It's open-source software. Yet Linux has some 99.9 percent name recognition in the hightech community.
The Wall Street Journal has become a high-technology trade paper. If you are in the high-tech field and your brand is not mentioned favorably and frequently in The Journal, you are not going to make it in the high-tech field.
It was publicity in The Wall Street Journal and other management publications that built brands like Cisco, Dell, Oracle, Microsoft, Palm, SAP, Sun Microsystems and Yahoo.
Steve: But didn't some major dot.coms succeed with advertising?
Al:
What dot.coms are successful? Amazon, Ebay and other dot.coms that relied on PR to build their brands. Those that tried to do it with advertising were notable failures. Google is another dot.com brand that rode to the top primarily with PR. Before I'd Googled that, the only two I knew off the top of my head were Google and Body Shop.

texaswriter
January 25th, 2010, 09:31 PM
Heh, I voted yes, but there are some people who just are clueless. That actually remind me of this virus that went around like 7 years ago. Lots of places were charging over $100 a pop to come to their home and install a $29-$49 piece of software.


Anyways, there will always be people who: Profit!! off of people like that.

:confused:

plurworldinc
January 25th, 2010, 09:50 PM
A Superbowl ad for Ubuntu would be amazing to see and a wonderful idea to get the word out. One of the main reasons more people are not using Ubuntu or Linux is just because they have no idea it's out there. If more people know about us then there would be a great chance of mainstreaming the system.

Just because there is a Superbowl ad does not mean the OS will suddenly become mainstream, but would just let the rest of the world have a peek of what most of use already know.

Look how well the Superbowl ad has worked in the past, remember 1984

Xbehave
January 25th, 2010, 09:50 PM
add Google to your list google do very little advertising.

pricetech
January 25th, 2010, 10:50 PM
1. What is Superbowl
2. How can I get Superbowl

1. It's a huge vessel that my son eats cereal out of.
2. Invite my son over for cereal.

On the other hand, if your question is serious:
1. The superbowl is the yearly championship game for American football.
2. I have no idea.

texaswriter
January 26th, 2010, 12:10 AM
Super Bowl is for American football what the World Cup is for futball (called soccer here in the States)

n0dix
January 26th, 2010, 12:17 AM
If they put the ad in the final Futbol (soccer) CUP this year i ensure you that more people will see than superbowl-

doublewitt
January 26th, 2010, 01:59 AM
Name 5 large companies that have thrived on just word of mouth? Your local pizza place doesn't count. Without any advertisement no business thrives, yes word of mouth is a form but its much slower and reaches the fewest people, no large company has ever made it on word of mouth alone. To even suggest it as the best option is horrible advice. I hope you don't have a degree in Marketing or Business.

Just off-hand, I can think of 2:

ACN
Melaleuca

In case you didn't know, these 2 companies enjoy great success. In the last few months, ACN did some "big" advertising but before that, they were real big with word-of-mouth technology. Anyways, there are more...

Xbehave
January 26th, 2010, 02:04 AM
If they put the ad in the final Futbol (soccer) CUP this year i ensure you that more people will see than superbowl-
It would be more expensive too because it is carried by different channels in different countries.

n0dix
January 26th, 2010, 02:06 AM
It would be more expensive too because it is carried by different channels in different countries.

Well it is, i don't think in that.:lolflag: me.

Kragnerac
January 26th, 2010, 02:38 AM
Eh, maybe in a few years. I don't think Ubuntu is quite ready for people that have to go to Geek Squad to install printer drivers and antiviruses yet... :P Yes there's people like that, unfortunately. Would be a good idea to do sometime in the future though. Would have to be a good ad though.

It has been "maybe in a few years, but it's not quite ready yet" for many years, now. If this sort of idea consists, it may turn into a constant hindrance. I'm not suggesting a full blown advertising attempt like the Superbowl, but at least something more than just mouth-of-word. The influx of users should inspire more developers to develop for Ubuntu, like the iPhone/iPod Touch App Store. If there were a much larger market, developers who were previously Windows/Mac OS X oriented may notice the recently enlarged market, and become interested in developing for Linux. The small user base (if contrasted to the two larger OSes) has been a reason a number of developers have been hesitant to code for Linux. If we allow Linux to stay in the shade from the public eye for an indefinite amount of time, there is a possibility it may lose its friction and sink into obscurity. :(

ubunterooster
January 26th, 2010, 03:05 AM
SURE, you pay :P

user1397
January 26th, 2010, 05:43 AM
if they have the money for it, then yea why not?

it'll probably raise awareness of ubuntu at least twice as much as say Dell has advertised ubuntu on its computers

ubuntu's goal is to become a competitive mainstream OS, not a hobby OS.

texaswriter
January 26th, 2010, 06:01 AM
Carpe Diem: "Seize the day"... I don't think it would be practical to buy expensive ads, mostly because Ubuntu is free.

dragos240
January 26th, 2010, 06:54 AM
の。

lykwydchykyn
January 26th, 2010, 07:17 AM
Maybe they should just sponsor a car in the indy 500. That'll really boost Linux market share.

:-\"

aysiu
January 26th, 2010, 07:31 AM
Maybe they should just sponsor a car in the indy 500. That'll really boost Linux market share.

:-\"
Exactly.

chessnerd
January 26th, 2010, 07:45 AM
If it didn't cost millions of dollars, then Canonical should definitely do it. However, it does.

Now, I do think that, maybe, Canonical, Red Hat, Novell, the FSF and a whole bunch of other Linux groups could get together and make an ad for the Superbowl about Linux in general. That would be more feasible, but still wouldn't be the best because of the cost of Superbowl ad time.

I might suggest buying ad time over the course of a week or so, but a Superbowl ad would catch the attention of the whole country (maybe the world) and could send a message, like the Mac 1984 ad, that desktop Linux is here and it is ready.

Not enough time left to do that now, but maybe for next year...

madhi19
January 26th, 2010, 08:05 AM
It a little too soon but when Ubuntu One has a Windows client they could advertise about that service. You get a return on investment on that part of Canonical business and at the same time you build brand recognition. But like I said in that brainstorm (http://brainstorm.ubuntu.com/idea/21582/) you get a big impact by having Mark go on Oprah it probably cost you a lot less!

jrev
January 26th, 2010, 09:55 AM
What are they advertising?

"Go out and buy a Ubuntu computer at Dell... ignore the part about Dell recommending Windows 7"

or

"Go to our website and download an .iso, burn it to CD, set your BIOS to boot from CD, repartition your drive, install Ubuntu, and then troubleshoot any potential hardware incompatibilities."

Advertising is for products people can buy.


Why not propose an address to buy a computer with ubuntu already installed ?
This information could be given in the installation forum for the beginners that are waiting for a practical way to go Ubuntu.

And propose a printer whose driver is in the actual ubuntu verssion ?

whiskeylover
January 26th, 2010, 12:30 PM
Why not propose an address to buy a computer with ubuntu already installed ?
This information could be given in the installation forum for the beginners that are waiting for a practical way to go Ubuntu.

And propose a printer whose driver is in the actual ubuntu verssion ?

Why the huge font?

doughed2003
January 26th, 2010, 12:54 PM
I had to say no to the superbowl ad. gazillions of people might flock to get ubuntu, then there would be bandwidth problems for a month or more. Superbowl ads are very steep in price, probably much more than cannonical makes in a certain period of time. It might be better for them to have a magazine ad or something. They could target a certain crowd that way, plus the ad would last longer (at least a month compared to only 30 seconds)

A superbowl ad might put too much pressure on the ubuntu dev team too, because of the huge amount of complaints/bugs coming in, and the short 6 month release schedules.

Great idea. like PC Magazine and include a live cd of one of the distros. but not sure if a full size cd would be ok in a mag. a business card one might work better.

jrev
January 26th, 2010, 01:17 PM
Why the huge font ?

It was for the superbowl ad :p

You have seen the effect !

ashwinrao
January 26th, 2010, 01:18 PM
I don't know how many of you aware of this fact. In Kerala which is a small and 100% literacy state of India, most of the primary schools are having Linux as primary OS in their computer labs. The next generation of children's will be primarily Linux users and Windows OS will be foreign for them. I like the idea of introducing Linux distros in basic level of education.

pricetech
January 26th, 2010, 06:53 PM
Maybe they should just sponsor a car in the indy 500. That'll really boost Linux market share.

:-\"

NASCAR. But then they might have to release "yallbuntu" to get rednecks to download it.

I can say this because I AM a redneck.

whiskeylover
January 26th, 2010, 07:05 PM
I can say it too because I'm NOT a redneck.

RabbitWho
January 26th, 2010, 07:18 PM
what's a super bowl?

whiskeylover
January 26th, 2010, 07:53 PM
A really big bowl.

Also, this (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_Bowl).

NCLI
January 26th, 2010, 09:23 PM
Almost no one outside of the US has heard of the superbowl, seriously. Internet ads and word of mouth is way better.

fromthehill
January 26th, 2010, 09:46 PM
add Google to your list google do very little advertising.
if there are more billboards there will be one with a google ad on it
if there is only one it will be hired by google
every single busstop has a google ad
they hired the entire front, second and backpage of a well-read newspaper
on the side of the road

you can't hide, they are everywhere :p

thelostubunt
January 26th, 2010, 09:49 PM
Good Idiea. Kinda

n0dix
January 26th, 2010, 10:37 PM
I don't know how many of you aware of this fact. In Kerala which is a small and 100% literacy state of India, most of the primary schools are having Linux as primary OS in their computer labs. The next generation of children's will be primarily Linux users and Windows OS will be foreign for them. I like the idea of introducing Linux distros in basic level of education.

Is good to know that. I will want that for Venezuela. The first touch of a distro where in the college. In here we don't have that culture. ;)

n0dix
January 26th, 2010, 10:39 PM
Almost no one outside of the US has heard of the superbowl, seriously. Internet ads and word of mouth is way better.

This is truth. That's way i recommend the Final Fultbol (Soccer) Cup. More people will see that. ;)

plurworldinc
January 31st, 2010, 04:24 PM
I was somewhat shocked to see that 71% of the people that answered this poll where against Canonical/Ubuntu having an ad in the Superbowl this year. I love using Ubuntu and a number of great Linux distro because they work. Everyone on the forum is a user of Ubuntu or Linux or at least has an idea what comes again.

Before three years ago I never even heard of Linux.If my Windows software failed the computer failed and it would have been thrown away. Now i at least know there is an option and a powerful alternative to Windows.

That poll should have read 100% support, if we as a community can not stand behind what we all love then what is the point being here at all.

chucky chuckaluck
January 31st, 2010, 04:33 PM
ad most likely to be used for a bathroom/beer break. the million dollars might be better spent on 'getting the word out' about reality.

Martje_001
January 31st, 2010, 04:40 PM
No, Linux isn't quite ready yet.

- We don't have a great indexing service yet (Gnome 3)
- We can't run games
- We're in the middle of a revolution looking at X / KMS / ATi-specifications and drivers / Nvidia RE / DRI2 / Galium3D
- We don't have a replacement for iTunes (yet, Ubuntu Music Store?)
- etc.

SuperSonic4
January 31st, 2010, 04:48 PM
No, Linux isn't quite ready yet.

- We don't have a great indexing service yet (Gnome 3)
- We can't run games
- We're in the middle of a revolution looking at X / KMS / ATi-specifications and drivers / Nvidia RE / DRI2 / Galium3D
- We don't have a replacement for iTunes (yet, Ubuntu Music Store?)
- etc.

Strigi covers your first point

dasunst3r
January 31st, 2010, 04:58 PM
I hold the conviction that word-of-mouth is the most economical and effective method of "getting the word out." Here's a counter-poll: What would you listen to more:
1. A personal endorsement from a friend with reasons as to why a certain product may be right for you
2. Some mass-broadcasted marketing slogan

There is not much money to go around, and it could most certainly be spent in better places.

Primefalcon
January 31st, 2010, 05:09 PM
I say yes to any major advertising, the problem with Linux is that it isn't advertised enough, also canonical needs to make deals with hardware manufacturers more and get it pre-installed

RabbitWho
January 31st, 2010, 05:24 PM
I think everyone should boycott this "superbowl" you speak of until they are willing to show gay people kissing. With tongues. And bottom pinching.

a2z
January 31st, 2010, 06:15 PM
look at the other side... people are trying to learn ms/mac for years now, and finally when theyre starting to get it, you want them to start this all over again? :D

i think linux should be more advertised but among students and people who can get they way around computers.. if you force linux advertising, youre no better than ms...
people should use what suits them best... if you like linux, good for you, but dont force it or youre no better than ms...
in my opinion linux is jack of all trades, but ms has few advantages (thousands of programmers who develop apps for ms, i.e. cell phone flashing apps or games).. everything else, ms thumb down, linux two thumbs up :)

I'm almost 46. I started with ms win98 in `98. I've sat and taught myself the system along with multiple software including my first gimps at the www.
Had I known at the time linux existed, I may have or may not have made the linux choice.
However, A year ago, I got fed up with ms, and did a quick google search on os's. Still not knowing much about other options except for
a few names thrown around like mac apple, ibm. hm (thats all I can really think of even now)
But anyway, I am happy to have found linux. Especially ubuntu. But afraid to dabble in other flavor.
As I said before, ms is like training wheels for computers. Linux is an open door to more.

So I'd say yes, linux needs to get the word out. To anyone who'll listen. You can't see it if it's not there.
And not by means of vehicles such as youtube where other ops can bash a good thing.

a2z

alexfish
January 31st, 2010, 06:23 PM
what's a super bowl?


Found this:
Super Bowl has become an unofficial holiday. Millions of people gather at homes and bars to watch the NFL cap their season. Along with the Super Bowl, comes Super Bowl parties. Some of these parties are nothing more than people sitting around, eating, drinking and watching the game. However, it can be a lot more.
Instructions


Start planning now. Make a list of people who truly enjoy parties. Avoid the negative drag and go for the positive, fun loving individual. This lone act will increase the fun two-fold.
Do more than a TV and snacks. Create an atmosphere of being at the Super Bowl. Send out invites that are tickets and inform the guests they must have them to entire. Set up a ticket gate at the door and have them enter through this area. Or ask everyone to dress like someone involved in the game, players, official, coach, cheerleader etc.
Come up with pre-game activities. This can include setting up a gaming system and let guests fight it out on NFL Madden. Set up a paper football tournament. Make a paper football out of the paper (Shaped as a triangle football we all used as kids) and have guests play a game against each other.

When the game starts, Like me ,create an atmosphere for those not wanting to watch the game. This could be something along the lines a movie session for anyone not wanting to watch the game.

Next Question :

Question 1.What is NFL

SuperSonic4
January 31st, 2010, 07:36 PM
Question 1.What is NFL

A 4 hour commercial break with American football occasionally interspersed between adverts

RabbitWho
January 31st, 2010, 07:41 PM
A 4 hour commercial break with American football occasionally interspersed between adverts

Ah ha! it's all to do with American football? I thought it might be a baseball thing, or is it lots of different sports like the olympics?

SuperSonic4
January 31st, 2010, 07:44 PM
Ah ha! it's all to do with American football? I thought it might be a baseball thing, or is it lots of different sports like the olympics?

It is not unlike the Champions League final in real association football

plurworldinc
February 1st, 2010, 03:52 AM
I thank word of mouth is a great way to get the word out about Linux, but this is a computer system, not a toy. If you want to be a serious contender in the OS market and prove yourself then you need to take risk and let the world know you are in the room.

Now i know the Superbowl is just another football game in the States, but most of us only watch the Superbowl for two reasons, the game and the ads. Most commercials ran during the Superbowl are talked about for months, maybe even years, that is why it's the world most expensive time-slot on television, world wide.

Ok, maybe Linux is not ready for mainstream, but you can sell the dream of something new. Tell the world and let them know we are here and we are coming. Tell the world they have been using us for years and never know our name. Most important , just et them know we are in the same room.:-({|=:-({|=:-({|=

samh785
February 1st, 2010, 03:59 AM
Personally I don't think Ubuntu is ready to go mainstream.
It needs to mature a bit yet, I agree.

aaaantoine
February 1st, 2010, 04:22 AM
When I worked for Starbuck's back in 2002, they *claimed* they had built the business to its then-current level without ever doing a real, honest-to-goodness advertising campaign, e.g. primarily on grass-roots word-of-mouth advertising. I cannot vouch for the truth of that, that's just what corporate told us.

Can we count that as one?

Maybe in 2002 they didn't advertise, but by 2004 I had seen a number of Starbucks ads on the LIRR (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_Island_Rail_Road)...

lykwydchykyn
February 1st, 2010, 06:27 AM
That poll should have read 100% support, if we as a community can not stand behind what we all love then what is the point being here at all.
Had you read the responses you'd see that, for the most part, the main objection is that such an ad would be an ineffective and inefficient use of resources. You are creating a false dichotomy saying "either you support a superbowl ad, or you don't support Ubunu".



Maybe in 2002 they didn't advertise, but by 2004 I had seen a number of Starbucks ads on the LIRR (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_Island_Rail_Road)...

I'm sure they have, and I've seen other ads since. I'm only pointing out what employees were told officially. Other sources seem to back this up.

But that was 8 years ago and I don't claim to have investigated the truth of it.

The bottom line is, there are examples of businesses which have built to substantial levels with only, or primarily, grass-roots advertisement.

pwnst*r
February 1st, 2010, 06:41 AM
Although I prefer football over gridiron football, I can't stand the cry babies that play a lot of the times.

LightB
February 1st, 2010, 09:06 AM
Glad the sensible choice is ahead.