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View Full Version : OFFline book piracy costs publishers $1 Trillion



earthpigg
January 23rd, 2010, 07:26 PM
http://go-to-hellman.blogspot.com/2010/01/offline-book-lending-costs-us.html


Offline Book "Lending" Costs U.S. Publishers Nearly $1 Trillion

ot on the heels of the story in Publisher's Weekly that "publishers could be losing out on as much $3 billion to online book piracy" comes a sudden realization of a much larger threat to the viability of the book industry. Apparently, over 2 billion books were "loaned" last year by a cabal of organizations found in nearly every American city and town. Using the same advanced projective mathematics used in the study cited by Publishers Weekly, Go To Hellman has computed that publishers could be losing sales opportunities totaling over $100 Billion per year, losses which extend back to at least the year 2000. These lost sales dwarf the online piracy reported yesterday, and indeed, even the global book publishing business itself.

From what we've been able to piece together, the book "lending" takes place in "libraries". On entering one of these dens, patrons may view a dazzling array of books, periodicals, even CDs and DVDs, all available to anyone willing to disclose valuable personal information in exchange for a "card". But there is an ominous silence pervading these ersatz sanctuaries, enforced by the stern demeanor of staff and the glares of other patrons. Although there's no admission charge and it doesn't cost anything to borrow a book, there's always the threat of an onerous overdue bill for the hapless borrower who forgets to continue the cycle of not paying for copyrighted material.


complete article, along with more of the scathing details at the link.

this is a travesty. offline piracy is destroying literature!

i say we all locate the nearest public library, and burn it to the ground. along with all the pirated books inside. for our children, and our children's children.

JDShu
January 23rd, 2010, 07:27 PM
:lolflag:

blueshiftoverwatch
January 23rd, 2010, 08:01 PM
We need to end home cooking as well, it's killing the restaurant industry!

HoboElectus
January 23rd, 2010, 08:12 PM
Since when is 100 billion a trillion?

falconindy
January 23rd, 2010, 08:14 PM
Since when is 100 billion a trillion?


$100 Billion per year, losses which extend back to at least the year 2000
Looks like 1 Trillion to me.

HoboElectus
January 23rd, 2010, 08:15 PM
Looks like 1 Trillion to me.

I shouldn't skim read.

cguy
January 23rd, 2010, 08:20 PM
You shouldn't read at all! (unless you buy the text) :D

earthpigg
January 23rd, 2010, 08:41 PM
You shouldn't read at all! (unless you buy the text) :D

this.

you damn pirates.

Skripka
January 23rd, 2010, 08:48 PM
http://go-to-hellman.blogspot.com/2010/01/offline-book-lending-costs-us.html



complete article, along with more of the scathing details at the link.

this is a travesty. offline piracy is destroying literature!

i say we all locate the nearest public library, and burn it to the ground. along with all the pirated books inside. for our children, and our children's children.

Stupidly overly-dramatic and exaggerated statistics are stupidly overly-dramatic and exaggerated.

earthpigg
January 23rd, 2010, 09:04 PM
Stupidly overly-dramatic and exaggerated statistics are stupidly overly-dramatic and exaggerated.

satirical article is satire.

cascade9
January 23rd, 2010, 09:20 PM
i say we all locate the nearest public library, and burn it to the ground. along with all the pirated books inside. for our children, and our children's children.

I'd be all for burning books, but I hate the little mustache I have to grow to do so. :biggrin:

HoboElectus
January 23rd, 2010, 09:25 PM
I'd be all for burning books, but I hate the little mustache I have to grow to do so. :biggrin:

Just draw one on with a pen?

Zoot7
January 23rd, 2010, 09:26 PM
Sales aren't what they like so they blame piracy, seems to be very much the norm these days. :rolleyes:

For the record, the IFPI posted figures for 2009 there a few days ago, whereby it seemed according to them that piracy was laying them out on their deathbed.
http://www.ifpi.org/content/section_resources/dmr2010.html

Honestly the whole "Piracy Fiasco" is nothing more than greedy capitalists acting in the name of profit.

Lightstar
January 23rd, 2010, 09:31 PM
Soon public libraries will be illegal :*(
Knowledge should be free, how else can we evolve?

But.. I doubt piracy "costs" anything.
They don't make as much money, true, but their bank doesn't get depleted everytime someone borrows a book. I think the correct way to write it would be. "Book company *could* have made 1 trillion dollars"

AllRadioisDead
January 23rd, 2010, 09:34 PM
Soon public libraries will be illegal :*(

Yeah, right.

Chronon
January 24th, 2010, 12:27 AM
http://go-to-hellman.blogspot.com/2010/01/offline-book-lending-costs-us.html



complete article, along with more of the scathing details at the link.

this is a travesty. offline piracy is destroying literature!

i say we all locate the nearest public library, and burn it to the ground. along with all the pirated books inside. for our children, and our children's children.

This guy should write for The Onion!

Chronon
January 24th, 2010, 12:28 AM
Yeah, right.

But. . . but. .. socialism. . . and. . and. . this is 'merica!

The Toxic Mite
January 24th, 2010, 12:34 AM
Bullcrap.

Babbage
January 24th, 2010, 12:36 AM
Yes I agree its a terrible crime. Everyone who shares a book with someone should be prosecuted, and prevented from accessing books again. [-X

Berk
January 24th, 2010, 12:39 AM
I thought it was an interesting article, so took the link over to another forum I use.
One of the guys there is a librarian here in the UK, it turns out that libraries do have funding to pay royalties to the authors.


The UK uses something called the public lending rights society to calculate which books by which authors are borrowed each year (it would be an enormous task to calculate it for each authority every year, so what they do is ask a selection of authorities per year for their records and estimate this into a countrywide figure, sucks to be a local author but otherwise there would be no money actually left to pay the authors) and has a sliding scale of figures which are then used to calculate how much an author gets in any particular year but basically for the UK the maximum you can receive in a year for your books being borrowed in a library is 6600 but i don't know how many of your books have to be borrowed for this to trigger.

The good side about this is that it goes straight to the author, not the publisher.

Aha, found it, this years rate per loan amount was 6.29p.

I have no idea how much of that is relevant to US libraries though, I just thought it was an interesting point.

Edit: Adding his link for more info on the payments that can be made to the authors found here: http://www.plr.uk.com/registrationservice/payments.htm

Malakai
January 24th, 2010, 12:55 AM
I do so love when aspiring writers point out the ridiculously fallacious overblown estimates about the harm + lost revenue piracy causes.

My favourite argument works for games, movies, tv series, and books. Ill use the library in my analogy. People who can afford to buy a book they like, will buy it, whether it is available in a public library or not, most of the time.
People who cannot afford to buy it, are likely not going to buy it whether a local library has it in stock or not. They can however still read and enjoy it, and spread the word about it, if it is available freely at a library.

I see movie, music, tv show sharing much the same way. Most people pirating things are not in the "I would have bought it if it wasn't available for download online" category. They would have borrowed it from a friend, or played it at a friends house (game), or watched/borrowed it at a friends house (movie/tv show).

Should it also be illegal to allow a friend to come over and watch a movie they themselves do not own, or play one of your games without bringing a copy they already paid for over with them?

Im sure the movie/music/game industry lawyers/bigwigs would absolutely love the answer to that question to be YES. Alas it is not so, because the idea of things working that way is totally insane.

Someone who isn't me, frequently pirates games and then buys them. But that same someone will usually not buy a game, even one that looks like it might be good, if they cannot download and sample it first. As far as games go, the absolute best anti-piracy measure is something that should be done anyway: INCLUDE GOOD MULTIPLAYER, which requires you to have a unique cd key to play online.
No annoying, punishing, bug-ridden fancy anti piracy schemes neccessary. There is a reason people still buy & stores still sell DiabloII, WC3, and Starcraft, despite none of them having draconian DRM on them (and most no longer even run cd checks with newest patches) blizz knows the want/need to play them online is enough motivation for people to go out & buy them.

Moreso I would argue that being able to download and play the single player parts of those games only encourages more sales; sampling d2 single player is just enough fun to draw you in and make you want to experience the multiplayer aspect of the game, to the pt where when you finally see the D2 Chest in the store you cannot resist dropping the money on it. Heck I have bought D2/LOD at least 3 times, starcraft twice, and WC3 + expansion both once when they were new, and then re-bought the battle chest just recently when I lost my originals in a move.

Frak
January 24th, 2010, 01:15 AM
Heh

THAT MUST REALLY SUCK, HUH?

Also, $100,000,000,000 != $1,000,000,000,000

jflaker
January 24th, 2010, 01:18 AM
Soon public libraries will be illegal :*(
Knowledge should be free, how else can we evolve?

But.. I doubt piracy "costs" anything.
They don't make as much money, true, but their bank doesn't get depleted everytime someone borrows a book. I think the correct way to write it would be. "Book company *could* have made 1 trillion dollars"

The "Cost" or "loss" is the money they could have made.

I think the problem is that there are few electronic versions available. If someone takes the time to scan a 400 page book into a PDF...I say let them share. Pirating books takes a hell of a lot of effort compared to movies or audio

JDShu
January 24th, 2010, 01:23 AM
I think the problem is that there are few electronic versions available. If someone takes the time to scan a 400 page book into a PDF...I say let them share. Pirating books takes a hell of a lot of effort compared to movies or audio

There are machines that do this actually, though they cost millions of dollars.

k64
January 24th, 2010, 01:32 AM
It's only because of the proprietary nature of book sellers, IMHO.

Frak
January 24th, 2010, 01:59 AM
There are machines that do this actually, though they cost millions of dollars.
And are terrible at what they do.