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destructaball
December 27th, 2009, 11:06 PM
I remember how awesome i thought it would be to be able to run android apps in ubuntu.
http://www.engadget.com/2009/05/26/canonical-giving-ubuntu-the-gift-of-android-apps/
What happened to it? I've googled it and I can find no mention of how the project is going, features regularly miss releases but they're rarely just forgotten about.

Queue29
December 27th, 2009, 11:19 PM
Why would you even want apps designed for a tiny screen cell phone to run on your laptop/desktop/devicethatisnotaphone?

Anything you can do on a phone, you can do on Ubuntu, using programs designed to run on .. Ubuntu. Except make phone calls I guess, but an execution environment isn't going to help with that anyway.

joey-elijah
December 27th, 2009, 11:19 PM
Y'know i wondered the same thing...

joey-elijah
December 27th, 2009, 11:21 PM
Why would you even want apps designed for a tiny screen cell phone to run on your laptop/desktop/devicethatisnotaphone?

Anything you can do on a phone, you can do on Ubuntu, using programs designed to run on .. Ubuntu. Except make phone calls I guess, but an execution environment isn't going to help with that anyway.

The idea behind it wasn't so much the "why" as the "we can".

Besides there are lots of reasons why having Android apps running in Ubuntu would be awesome and would a) widen the market for Android Apps and b) give users choice! There are plenty of android applications which i'd love to be able to run on my desktop.

Queue29
December 28th, 2009, 12:03 AM
There are plenty of android applications which i'd love to be able to run on my desktop.

Examples?

Maybe if the FOSS world would quit wasting time on projects like this, something worthwhile might be produced?

ElSlunko
December 28th, 2009, 12:06 AM
Examples?

Maybe if the FOSS world would quit wasting time on projects like this, something worthwhile might be produced?

Yeah FOSS has nothing worthwhile to show.

Queue29
December 28th, 2009, 12:16 AM
Yeah FOSS has nothing worthwhile to show.

I meant in place of what amounts to a phone - emulator (which already exists - just use the Android plugin for eclipse)
Without FOSS I wouldn't have a job.

gnomeuser
December 28th, 2009, 01:24 AM
Why would you even want apps designed for a tiny screen cell phone to run on your laptop/desktop/devicethatisnotaphone?


I have to admit the calendar widget/application on my HTC Hero is most beautiful, functional and well designed calendar applications I have ever used. I would love it if I could have it on my desktop as well.

dimeotane
February 27th, 2010, 11:09 PM
I'm wondering the same thing. Perhaps Ubuntu got flack from Google for their demo, and they've not showed it again since.

Another method of getting Android in Ubuntu, is to boot the android.iso in virtualbox.

motin
April 15th, 2010, 10:44 AM
Yeah, WHAT HAPPENED?? It sounded so promising last year, but now, nothing, I mean _nothing_, has happened for months and months?

The developer hacking away on this hasn't updated it's blog since Aug 27 2009
http://mjfrey.blogspot.com/

He but mentions the fact that some core parts that are needed to use google services are not included in the git tree. "Free but not Open". Maybe his interest dropped after this insight.

The android.iso is available here: http://code.google.com/p/live-android/
EDIT:

Comment by caavchen, Nov 22, 2009
No updates or news since four months ago. I think this project is dead. If you are looking for running Android on x86, Please try Android-x86 1.6, http://www.android-x86.org/. This is a real open source project and very activity.

Comment by xeskhw, Nov 22, 2009
Totally agree with caavchen. Android-x86 is much better.

Then there is the simulator approach: http://news.softpedia.com/news/How-to-Run-Android-Applications-on-Ubuntu-115152.shtml
(For me, running on a netbook, the default simulator skin is to big to fit on screen real estate and veeery slow though)

According to the blueprint:
https://blueprints.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+spec/mobile-karmic-android-execution-environment

It's prio is set to "Priority: Low (Needs guidance)" with the whiteboard at "Waiting on OSG to hear more on Android progress"

It's like everyone that thought about hacking away on this are thinking "hey, no need, canonical is working hard on this, I'll jump on the wagon when they get some code up at launchpad". But then Canonical is no longer working on it, without announcing that fact, which leads to the silent death of any possiblity of seeing this in Ubuntu in the foreseeable future...

Anything we can do to help?

hellocatfood
July 8th, 2010, 06:27 PM
Unfortunately I don't think anything is going to happen with this. Maybe when the software centre allows paid apps people will start wanting it again, but until then we're out of luck

Johnsie
July 15th, 2010, 01:09 PM
having this would give us access to a whole lot of new apps that many of us already enjoy on our phones. Apps would be like widgets on Ubuntu and it would be useful for alot of people who use their phone to organise thier lives.

MaxIBoy
July 15th, 2010, 01:28 PM
Ubuntu *does* run on a lot of phones. I think you can install it on any phone supported by Android (admittedly with a lot of work.) At which point it really would be useful to have an Android execution environment available.

hellocatfood
September 9th, 2010, 06:10 PM
Ubuntu *does* run on a lot of phones. I think you can install it on any phone supported by Android (admittedly with a lot of work.) At which point it really would be useful to have an Android execution environment available.

Ubuntu may run on a lot of phones but there's no support for it. There are a huge number of reasons why Android is successful but one of them is because it's supported by lots of phone manufacturers. Recently it seems like every week there's another company making a phone, tablet or other device running Android.

Bringing Andorid apps to Ubuntu I think would help to blur the lines between desktop and mobile and would just give both more platforms to release their software on

bornagainpenguin
December 7th, 2010, 08:33 PM
There are plenty of android applications which i'd love to be able to run on my desktop.

Examples?


FeedR (http://feedr.podzone.net/)! I know the guy writing Naufrago! is hard at work trying to bring this feature back to the Linux desktop, but with the demise of Straw there are no offline feed readers for Ubuntu. FeedR is a nice little app that allows me to cache my feeds for offline reading in places where I don't have access to internet. If I could get it to run on my eeepc as well as it runs on my Pandigital Novel I'd be ecstatic!

Weather & Toggle Widgets (http://androidandme.com/2010/04/reviews/weather-toggle-widget-easily-personalize-your-weather-settings/)! What's that you say? Ubuntu has a weather app built right into the Gnome desktop, which lives in the notification area? Yeah, but unlike the Weather & Toggle Widget, the weather applet doesn't know where I live. I have to go as far as thirty miles away to get "local" weather.

Aldiko (http://www.aldiko.com/) and Laputa (http://laputareader.com/)! Because as good as FBReader and Lucidor (http://lucidor.org/lucidor/) are these are ePub readers that work better and are easer to read with.

Those are just a few of the apps I love in Android, that would be well at home in Ubuntu, including ones that have features not available at all right now.

--bornagainpenguin

PS: Sorry for the necro, but I'd just remembered that this was promised and went hunting for it, when I found this thread, I couldn't let it pass... (http://xkcd.com/386/)

discord
December 8th, 2010, 01:36 PM
with honeycomb, they will make android tablets, so future apps might not only be for the small screen. I'd love to have these widgets, on my debian desktop ;)

Paulplex
December 8th, 2010, 01:47 PM
T...There are plenty of android applications which i'd love to be able to run on my desktop.Yup; 'Angry Birds', anyone? :D

Adrastus
April 25th, 2011, 04:39 AM
Can anyone shine some light on this? The launchpad page for the project isn't helpful at all.

Johnsie
April 25th, 2011, 12:02 PM
Android could end up becoming an Ubuntu killer if the compatibility layer isn't introduced. It's better to work with Android than against it. We have alot to gain from Android if people would put their minds to it.

onebir
July 10th, 2011, 08:34 AM
I've just been trying apps that work well in "tablet mode" on a tablet netbook (Asus T91). In particularly a PDF/djvu reader for fullscreen book reading. None of the existing ones work perfectly (Evince is ok). I suspect some android apps could work better for this...

bornagainpenguin
December 14th, 2011, 08:11 PM
SIGH...

Would have really rather have seen this instead of "Unity" because it would have really added to the application and games stack without messing with the functionality of my OS experience in the GUI.

Been playing with Android x86 lately and while it is still a bit rough, once enough bugs get worked out and hardware acceleration kicks in it will be enough to eat Ubuntu's lunch. I fear the choice to do Unity instead of this spells an unfortunate "focus shift" for Canonical...

--bornagainpenguin

PS: Also, add the Fanfiction Reader (https://market.android.com/details?id=com.apps.webreader&hl=en), Game Dev Story (http://www.appbrain.com/app/game-dev-story/net.kairosoft.android.gamedev3en), and Beautiful Widgets (https://market.android.com/details?id=com.levelup.beautifulwidgets&hl=en) to the list of Android apps I wish were available on Linux. The last because for some strange reason Ubuntu seems to think the closest town to me is over thirty miles away so the weather is always wrong.

--bornagainpenguin

HDave
December 21st, 2011, 05:56 PM
Android could end up becoming an Ubuntu killer if the compatibility layer isn't introduced. It's better to work with Android than against it. We have alot to gain from Android if people would put their minds to it.

I couldn't agree more. I also hope we've all realized by now that the "why would you want to run a tiny cell phone app" argument is nonsense. If you have picked up an Android tablet (e.g. Nook, Galaxy Tab, etc.), or even a large screen smart phone like the HTC Thunderbolt you know what I mean.

Frankly, I find the quality and features of Android apps to be as good as, or in some cases, better than the web or desktop versions.

I can't believe that Canonical put all this effort into Unity, etc. to make Ubuntu work on a Tablet when Android is already there. IMO that effort should have been spent creating a synthesized Ubuntu/Android environment where we get the best of both worlds, but on a traditional large screen, multi-processor CPU, keyboard & mouse driven computer.

Let me put this another way, there are many great desktop apps that I cannot run on Android such as Adobe Creative Suite and Quickbooks, etc. so I need to have a desktop/laptop computer with a big screen and a keyboard. But since I can't run some of these apps on Ubuntu, I keep a Windows VM around. If I could run a Windows VM side by side with Android on my desktop computer, then what do I need Ubuntu for? Think about it.

If they don't get on with this work, 5 years from now people will wonder what happened to Ubuntu and the Linux desktop. Maybe they'll do a search and find this thread and go...."Oh, Ubuntu focused on winning the desktop war just in time for nobody to care".

benmajor2005
January 4th, 2012, 12:54 AM
Even though I've developed software for mainframes360/unix/linux boxes over the past 30 years, the option to mine Droid apps for useful dock-widgets/panel-applets sounds very appealing. Why would it have to be anything more glamorous, threatening or weird than that.
We already use applets from different desktops, and apps from different OS's, together on one machine (because people want or need to). What's the big deal? Most people would laugh at religious desktop zealots decrying Ubuntu users from violating the pureness of their desktops with an XFCE applet? What's wrong with more options and more exposure for android apps?
I doubt there is just a small market for people wanting/needing to display multiple apps side-by-side on a larger desktop screen. There are plenty of reasons that could be interesting/useful/fun. Or allow individual apps to be projected much larger for the vision-challenged or situations where for whatever reason, a person can't hold the device in their hands pr be close to it.
Some people prefer/need to work with multiple monitors on a singe desktop? What's so crazy & unmarkatable about using multiple apps on a larger screen with a computer that has more I/O, storage, and connectivity options.
Some people out in linux-land seem to think "Don't need no stink'n android apps on MY desktop. Got everything I ever need right here in my trusty repositories~! Heck, what I can't locate, config or pipe, I'll script or hack...humbug. murmur murmor murmor..." it's possible to do anything with Linux [chest thumping here] That is, so long as u are lucky enough to fit the technical\work\education\experience\lifestyle criteria. If u are, more #bash!sudo&&grep|script!!> to yah. But I'd rather not go hunting and hacking on a very useful mobile device to get what I need, then come back to my desktop and go hunting and hacking for what I need.
To each his own. Wise man once said "Don't Yuk! somebody's Yum!".
Why bother to enable Android apps to run on other platforms? Don't take my word for it. Just ask Google. ChromeOS and Android will merge, WebOS will find it's niches, iPhone apps won't be limited to iPhones, and iPad apps won't be limited to iPads. Apps will scale appropriately to the needs and realities of use-cases and platform attributes. So to, Chromedroid, OS or whatever the heck it will be called (maybe revert to just the brand name, "Google" once the platforms are integrated?)

OK, I'm done with the soapboax. Gonna go and get me a virtual ice cream sandwich...

HDave
January 4th, 2012, 06:21 AM
Amen to that brother.

1clue
January 4th, 2012, 06:35 AM
Did anyone mention Android software development and testing?

bornagainpenguin
February 15th, 2012, 09:57 PM
Why bother to enable Android apps to run on other platforms? Don't take my word for it. Just ask Google. ChromeOS and Android will merge, WebOS will find it's niches, iPhone apps won't be limited to iPhones, and iPad apps won't be limited to iPads. Apps will scale appropriately to the needs and realities of use-cases and platform attributes. So to, Chromedroid, OS or whatever the heck it will be called (maybe revert to just the brand name, "Google" once the platforms are integrated?)

Not just that, but there's also the fact that BlueStacks (http://bluestacks.com/) is forging ahead and porting their Android Player runtime environment to Windows and MacOS, but not Linux--probably precisely because Canonical made such a big stink about releasing their own and BlueStacks doesn't want to compete. So we get nothing.

What makes it even more depressing is that if Canonical were to build something that could run Android apps natively and do so in such a way they integrated into the operating system they would have a much better implementation than could ever be possible on Windows or MacOS because they could build functionality right into the OS itself...

Instead we get the Unity and Hud focus shift.


--bornagainpenguin

aaaantoine
February 16th, 2012, 12:28 AM
Examples?

Maybe if the FOSS world would quit wasting time on projects like this, something worthwhile might be produced?

Netflix. If the web version is going to be bound to Silverlight, then users can fall back to the Android version.

Edit: Uh, sorry. I just realized how old this is.

HansKisaragi
February 16th, 2012, 02:36 AM
I love android but i don't want to run android apps on linux.-

1clue
February 16th, 2012, 02:59 AM
Actually I would. I am contemplating a Linux PC in my car, and an android emulator would give me access to lots of neat android mobile apps and still let me at an unrestricted, unmonitored Linux box.

3rdalbum
February 16th, 2012, 05:10 AM
We need an Android execution environment in Linux, otherwise there will be few/no tablet-optimised programs for Linux, even by the time Canonical partners with a tablet manufacturer.

Plus, having 20,000 Android games on the desktop would be a feather in our caps, even if they are really very shallow smartphone games. Not all of them would be shallow - I imagine Experia Play-optimised games would be able to work too, but mapped to the keyboard or other input devices.

HansKisaragi
February 16th, 2012, 05:42 AM
We need an Android execution environment in Linux, otherwise there will be few/no tablet-optimised programs for Linux, even by the time Canonical partners with a tablet manufacturer.

Plus, having 20,000 Android games on the desktop would be a feather in our caps, even if they are really very shallow smartphone games. Not all of them would be shallow - I imagine Experia Play-optimised games would be able to work too, but mapped to the keyboard or other input devices.

Most android apps are multi-touch apps.

Would be pretty weird to use on a pc.. just saying.. but you have a point.

1clue
February 16th, 2012, 06:41 AM
Most android apps are multi-touch apps.

Would be pretty weird to use on a pc.. just saying.. but you have a point.

Mac OS is multi-touch as well with 1, 2, 3 and 4-finger gestures. It takes all of about 10 minutes to get used to it, 20 minutes to improve your productivity with it and about 2 weeks to get used to single-touch going back to Linux. I'm all for multi-touch on Linux. Can't believe it's not there already.

For something that sounds so simple and trivial, it really makes a huge difference.

HansKisaragi
February 16th, 2012, 10:25 AM
Mac OS is multi-touch as well with 1, 2, 3 and 4-finger gestures. It takes all of about 10 minutes to get used to it, 20 minutes to improve your productivity with it and about 2 weeks to get used to single-touch going back to Linux. I'm all for multi-touch on Linux. Can't believe it's not there already.

For something that sounds so simple and trivial, it really makes a huge difference.

Touch screens are not a standard yet for desktop pcs and cost 3 times more usually.

I just looked at a local web store and they had 2 touch screens.

1 cost 6 times more for a 17" touch then for what i paid for my 24" 1080p screen.

But hey.. it never hurts to have touch-ability in the OS.

1clue
February 16th, 2012, 04:19 PM
It would be cumbersome at best for touch screens on a desktop PC. That IMO is why they are so rare, they're only really used for special applications or kiosks.

Macs are multi-touch through the track pad. Apple has that down so well right now that I stopped using my "magic mice" (which are also multi-touch but only 2 fingers or 1 finger) and started using a track pad by choice, because it's more convenient than the mouse.

3rdalbum
February 17th, 2012, 02:22 AM
Would have really rather have seen this instead of "Unity" because it would have really added to the application and games stack without messing with the functionality of my OS experience in the GUI.

The GUI change was inevitable - Gnome 2 isn't maintained anymore, and MATE didn't exist at the time (and it seems to barely exist even now).

bornagainpenguin
February 21st, 2012, 09:14 PM
The GUI change was inevitable - Gnome 2 isn't maintained anymore, and MATE didn't exist at the time (and it seems to barely exist even now).

Sure, but it could have been Shuttleworth in front of the MATE or the Cinnamon projects instead of Lefebvre. Instead we got "unity" and all its intentional lack of customizations. Heck the Cinnamon project proves that it really didn't take a whole GUI shift it would have been completely possible to extend Gnome Shell fallback mode to maintain the default look and feel of Ubuntu. Probably a lot less work also...

Which would have allowed Canonical to focus on bringing some life into the Android Execution Environment, instead of trying to foist Netbook Remix on people who don't really want it...

Regardless, the above is not why I'm posting in this thread. I just saw this and wondered what the other disappointed posters in this thread thought:


Ubuntu on Android becomes real, looks to take on Moto's Webtop experience

By Phil Nickinson (/author/phil-nickinson)

http://www.google.com/images/icons/ui/gprofile_button-16.png
(https://plus.google.com/115963387846188704264) 21 Feb 2012 12:04 pm


http://cdn.androidcentral.com/sites/androidcentral.com/files/imagecache/w550h500/postimages/684/ubuntu-android-2.jpg (http://cdn.androidcentral.com/sites/androidcentral.com/files/postimages/684/ubuntu-android-2.jpg)

This, folks, is Ubuntu (http://androidcentral.com/tags/ubuntu) on Android. An honest-to-goodness, not janky or VNC'd (http://www.androidcentral.com/ubuntu-galaxy-tab-101), full build of the Linux distro powered by an Android smartphone.

We'll let that sink in.


http://cdn.androidcentral.com/sites/androidcentral.com/files/imagecache/w300h250/postimages/684/ubuntu-1.png (http://cdn.androidcentral.com/sites/androidcentral.com/files/postimages/684/ubuntu-1.png)


Canonical -- the company behind Ubuntu -- today announced that it's bringing the full Ubuntu experience to multi-core Android phones in the same way that Motorola has attempted to extend its hardware to a more traditional computing experience with Webtop (http://androidcentral.com/tags/webtop). That is, you'll connect your phone to a keyboard and display, and from there have full control over a proper Ubuntu experience, all powered by the phone. Because your Android smartphone is already running a Linux kernel, the marriage between your phone and Ubuntu is darn near seamless. The Ubuntu build actually shares the kernel from your phone and boots in parallel.

See the rest of the article here (http://www.androidcentral.com/ubuntu-android-becomes-real-looks-take-motos-webtop-experience?utm_source=topbar&utm_medium=alert&utm_campaign=mobilenations&utm_term=120221-Full+Ubuntu+Linux+on+Android+is+a+reality!).

Personally I think it is a step in the right direction and very cool, but not something that looks like it will get in the hands of the average person who posts on Ubuntu Forums any time soon. Certainly not a replacement for being able to run the many cool hundreds and thousands of Android apps on Ubuntu any time soon. Not an excuse for the mess that is "unity" and which makes mockery out of the word.

But it is cool.

--bornagainpenguin