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farkinid
December 11th, 2009, 03:34 AM
OK, I'm a really really new Ubuntu user. 1 1/2 weeks into Ubuntu and I find it very useful at work. So much so that I've begun talking to my family and friends about it.

However, since I started the preaching, I've been hearing the same word again and again. 'Geek' is this word and its got me worried. I've been using a Microsoft operating system almost my entire life. I remember the days of PC-Dos and then MS-Dos up till Windows 7 (currently dual booting it with Ubuntu 9.10 at home).

During the MS days, I've never been called a 'Geek'. But suddenly I'm branded a 'geek' because I discovered Linux is awesome at work (play is a different story). What can I do to remove this stigma? Also, please share the any examples of recovering from this label.

whiskeylover
December 11th, 2009, 03:35 AM
What can I do to remove this stigma?

Hahahaha! Too late.

whoop
December 11th, 2009, 03:40 AM
just wear the stigma ;)...

SLEEPER_V
December 11th, 2009, 03:43 AM
better than 'oh, you're one of those people."

chris4585
December 11th, 2009, 03:46 AM
being a geek isn't a bad thing... but just tell those people that anyone can use ubuntu, its not just for geeks

chillicampari
December 11th, 2009, 03:48 AM
...

However, since I started the preaching....

Guessing that might be a big part of it right there.

Sealbhach
December 11th, 2009, 03:49 AM
At one time, you needed to be a hardcore geek to even install any Linux distro. But not anymore. People still have old outdated ideas about desktop Linux.

.

tgalati4
December 11th, 2009, 03:55 AM
Wear your geekness proudly. Don't be a Smart Mass (http://thinkgeek.com)

Things that can help:

1. Use soap.
2. No 1 implies some form of bathing.
3. Remove excess body hair.
4. Change clothes every so often.
5. Repeat steps 1 through 4 as often as humanly possible.

lisati
December 11th, 2009, 03:56 AM
At one time, you needed to be a hardcore geek to even install any Linux distro. But not anymore. People still have old outdated ideas about desktop Linux.

.

:) My first nearly-hands-on exposure to Linux was through a version of Red Hat (courtesy of a book & CD from my local library) but I was put off even trying to install it by the "geeky" stuff I'd need to learn (and I'm no stranger to computers!!!!) A year or two later I discovered Ubuntu. The installation process was much friendlier, and I even got to try it before installing! Wow!

sliketymo
December 11th, 2009, 03:57 AM
Keep smiling,makes folks wonder what your up to.

farkinid
December 11th, 2009, 04:02 AM
Hmm... right. From all the replies above, I gather the best course of action is stop preaching, smile all the time (though I think this will make me look a little nuts), buy and use a Tauntaun Sleeping Bag (which is friggin cool) and accept my geekiness (and henceforth my inability to get laid?)

jpmelos
December 11th, 2009, 04:03 AM
Congratulations. You are now an enlightened human being and your duty is now to enjoy your freedom.

ElSlunko
December 11th, 2009, 04:14 AM
Geek is sheik :P

Mr. Picklesworth
December 11th, 2009, 04:17 AM
Wear your geekness proudly. Don't be a Smart Mass (http://thinkgeek.com)

Things that can help:

1. Use soap.
2. No 1 implies some form of bathing.
3. Remove excess body hair.
4. Change clothes every so often.
5. Repeat steps 1 through 4 as often as humanly possible.

Woah.

...You need to repeat those?

sliketymo
December 11th, 2009, 04:19 AM
OP got 'buntu.:lolflag:

the yawner
December 11th, 2009, 04:37 AM
Woah.

...You need to repeat those?
Shocking ne? And you have to do it more than twenty times a year.

As for TS, just try to be subtle about promoting the OS. The moment you start going "guys, you got to try this out" things start going downhill.

RiceMonster
December 11th, 2009, 04:38 AM
Follow this process:

1) Stop preaching

Diluted
December 11th, 2009, 04:40 AM
Yes, stop preaching. An OS is a tool, not a religion.

starcannon
December 11th, 2009, 05:38 AM
If you happen to know how to get into Bios, that is enough right there for a vast majority to consider you a geek. If you know about a command line interface for any of the 3 major operating systems, then all doubt is removed.

People like to give less than appealing names to people and things they do not understand. So your a geek today, if for some reason Linux were to become the OS of choice, or even capture 1/3 of the market share, then you'd just be a regular joe again.

Enjoy your new title.

mkendall
December 11th, 2009, 07:26 AM
What can I do to remove this stigma?

Don't be such a dork. There is no stigma.

murderslastcrow
December 11th, 2009, 08:40 AM
After you get people familiar with it and explain it a little slower, not so emphatically, it'll catch on. My family and friends are all pretty good with it since they've had a chance to try it, a little help switching, and although not all of them realize their freedoms are being respected, the point is that it's so good that they don't really need to know their freedoms are being preserved.

:O I'm a total geek and I get plenty of action. Just sayin'. XD

madnessjack
December 11th, 2009, 10:53 AM
Do like Joeb454

We were eating out with some ladieees once, I saw this familiar logo attached to his keyring. I burst out laughing, but when the girls asked what it was, he explained:

It's Ubuntu. It means 'humanity towards others'
or whatever the philosophy is!

I just looked at him an laughed :P

purgatori
December 11th, 2009, 11:00 AM
... I wish I had your problems.

Swagman
December 11th, 2009, 11:15 AM
You took the Red Pill

You can't be re-inserted into the Matrix


Enjoy

I'm going to learn Ubuntu (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yX8yrOAjfKM&feature=player_embedded)

Chame_Wizard
December 11th, 2009, 01:43 PM
Be happy,you have a much better life as a geek now.:P

nothingspecial
December 11th, 2009, 02:11 PM
3 years ago, I didn`t know how to switch a computer on.

Today, I advised someone in their usage of the python programming language.

It a disease, it starts with installing Ubuntu. The symptoms gradually get worse.

You can`t stop it, just ride it.......Geek. :D

t0p
December 11th, 2009, 02:18 PM
Wear your geekness proudly.

Things that can help:

1. Use soap.
2. No 1 implies some form of bathing.
3. Remove excess body hair.
4. Change clothes every so often.
5. Repeat steps 1 through 4 as often as humanly possible.

What do you mean by "excess body hair"? Hairs on the palms of your hands? A furry tongue? Long hairs sticking out of your ears? It might be unsightly, but none of that has anything to do with geekery.

Maybe you mean men should shave their legs? Wax their chests? Refrain from cultivating moustaches and beards? Well, none of that has anything to do with geekery either. It's a matter of personal taste: some folk like facial hair, some don't. Some folk like hairy men, some don't. But being hairy is absolutely nothing to do with being a geek.

But the stuff about bathing and changing clothes regularly is definitely relevant. Some computer enthusiasts can be engrossed in their computers for days at a time, forgetting about eating, sleeping, washing, changing clothes... another can of Jolt and they're good. But such geeks as those will take no notice of your advice. They don't care about social interaction, so the concept of caring what other people think is utterly alien to them.

mivo
December 11th, 2009, 02:21 PM
OK, I'm a really really new Ubuntu user. [...] However, since I started the preaching ... What can I do to remove this stigma?

By not preaching. You said you are "really, really new" to Linux, and before you have actually gained any substantial experience, you try to convert people to something you know only very little about.

It's very common for new Linux users to get very excited and then begin missionary work right away before even their first reinstall or distro upgrade, and while there is nothing wrong with enthusiasm, it's a geekish thing to do, because for most people a computer is simply a tool, not something you get all excited about. (Especially since most average users don't really look at an OS as something significantly different from their computer.)