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Blacklightbulb
December 10th, 2009, 09:32 PM
Little story:
Today my mate brought me a system for diagnosis (turns out the mobo was fault anyways). As I was in need to check out the cpu I tried to detach the head sink. It was unbelievable hard to remove. I had to put on a LOT of force. Turns out my friend has emptied the entire thermal paste tube on it lol. Anyway, it finally came apart. Surprisingly though, the CPU wasn't there :?: It was glued hard in place on the heat sink while the socket lock was still in place on the motherboard! The socket border was full of thermal paste. When I tried to get the cpu off the heatsink, my hands became a mix of sweat and thermal paste and the cpu still wouldn't come of. Then I gave it a final thrust. It came of, slipped of my hand onto the floor, pins in the air. After cleaning the heatsink and mobo off thermal paste, it was the cpu's turn. As I was full of frustration, It accidentally slipped of my hands a second time. This time it hit the floor from a height of 1.5 meter in the gold triangle corner. I picked it to discover the corner was a bit flattened as if a piece of thick cardboard. Without much hope I picked the pliers and tried to squash it back together lol (I know that was stupid). Anyway, being so frustrated, I was a bit to rough and bent down some pins and most others were filled from thermal paste on my fingers. Just for the sake of it I tried to straighten the pins and clean the thermal paste with a compass (the one used to draw circle, that has a long needle). Only after it occurred to me that dragging sharp needle on the base of a cpu was a great idea. I put the AMD 64 3500+ (at least it not expensive I thought!) in an only test board. Switched to who system and............................................... ...........................nothing happened...........weird? no lol......then I spy the sliced wire that should be connected to the PSU. I repair the cable, switch it on........................and IT WORKS IT FREAKIN WORKS. I FREAKEN EVEN TOASTED THE SYSTEM AND IT STILL WORKS!!!!

I'm so amazed I had to write a whole wall of text of excitement!

NoaHall
December 10th, 2009, 09:36 PM
I did this before. Spilt some thermal paste on the pins, so cleaned them. Wouldn't fit then, as they were bent. Spent a while bending them back, and worked perfectly for about two years. Didn't use it on my main system though.

sdowney717
December 10th, 2009, 09:36 PM
the working silicon is actually buried inside that plastic casing. and is quite small. so all you did was adjust the outside of it not enough to harm it.

starcannon
December 10th, 2009, 09:38 PM
Little story:
Today my mate brought me a system for diagnosis (turns out the mobo was fault anyways). As I was in need to check out the cpu I tried to detach the head sink. It was unbelievable hard to remove. I had to put on a LOT of force. Turns out my friend has emptied the entire thermal paste tube on it lol. Anyway, it finally came apart. Surprisingly though, the CPU wasn't there :?: It was glued hard in place on the heat sink while the socket lock was still in place on the motherboard! The socket border was full of thermal paste. When I tried to get the cpu off the heatsink, my hands became a mix of sweat and thermal paste and the cpu still wouldn't come of. Then I gave it a final thrust. It came of, slipped of my hand onto the floor, pins in the air. After cleaning the heatsink and mobo off thermal paste, it was the cpu's turn. As I was full of frustration, It accidentally slipped of my hands a second time. This time it hit the floor from a height of 1.5 meter in the gold triangle corner. I picked it to discover the corner was a bit flattened as if a piece of thick cardboard. Without much hope I picked the pliers and tried to squash it back together lol (I know that was stupid). Anyway, being so frustrated, I was a bit to rough and bent down some pins and most others were filled from thermal paste on my fingers. Just for the sake of it I tried to straighten the pins and clean the thermal paste with a compass (the one used to draw circle, that has a long needle). Only after it occurred to me that dragging sharp needle on the base of a cpu was a great idea. I put the AMD 64 3500+ (at least it not expensive I thought!) in an only test board. Switched to who system and............................................... ...........................nothing happened...........weird? no lol......then I spy the sliced wire that should be connected to the PSU. I repair the cable, switch it on........................and IT WORKS IT FREAKIN WORKS. I FREAKEN EVEN TOASTED THE SYSTEM AND IT STILL WORKS!!!!

I'm so amazed I had to write a whole wall of text of excitement!

Holy hell....

pricetech
December 10th, 2009, 10:02 PM
If you're gentle, straightening pins won't hurt a thing. It never ceases to amaze me though that some people can't seem to let go of the myth that "if a little is good, a lot should be better".

starcannon
December 10th, 2009, 10:04 PM
If you're gentle, straightening pins won't hurt a thing. It never ceases to amaze me though that some people can't seem to let go of the myth that "if a little is good, a lot should be better".
Hey, it works with beer....

Bartender
December 11th, 2009, 02:52 AM
Next time you find yourself applying ludicrous amounts of force to a CPU, stop. Put the heatsink back on and run the thing for 10 minutes or so. Generally some heat will help soften up thermal paste.

Your friend needs to read up on the proper amount of thermal paste. More is not better.

Marvin666
December 11th, 2009, 02:56 AM
Pea sized amount at most, then spread evenly over the whole surface of the cpu.

tom66
December 11th, 2009, 02:58 AM
Next time you find yourself applying ludicrous amounts of force to a CPU, stop. Put the heatsink back on and run the thing for 10 minutes or so. Generally some heat will help soften up thermal paste.

Your friend needs to read up on the proper amount of thermal paste. More is not better.
He said the motherboard was faulty. It would be likely the CPU would only run for a few seconds at a time.

SunnyRabbiera
December 11th, 2009, 03:01 AM
Well take a processor, smash it with a hammer and find out :D

argosreality
December 11th, 2009, 03:02 AM
Processors are fairly durable (unless you've actually popped them off their sodder...friend did that when he forgot he'd attached an aftermarket heatsink with a mixture of superglue and thermalgoo) but still I have a bad feeling about the continued longevity of that processor ;)

Anyone ever had to fix the pin layout on the 80pin SCSI drives? THAT was frustrating especially after a full cup of coffee

JBAlaska
December 11th, 2009, 03:05 AM
I run into this all the time with cheap thermal paste, It's best to just unlock the CPU and remove the heatsink and cpu as a unit. Then you can use a exacto knife (or a steak knife) to pry them apart. acetone or Vodka works good for cleaning the paste of (don't use rubbing alcohol as it has baby oil in it).

As you found out a CPU can take quite a beating as long as it doesn't get a static zap.

SunnyRabbiera
December 11th, 2009, 03:05 AM
Processors are fairly durable

until you strap some dynamite to them :popcorn:

Sorry too much mythbusters :D

MooPi
December 11th, 2009, 03:21 AM
Does anyone remember that Gateway at one time used thermal glue between the heat sink and CPU. A friend brought me their Gateway because it was rebooting and smelled hot. It turns out that the fan on the heat sink had gone bad as well as the heat sink being clogged with cigarette tar. I decided to replace both the heat sink and fan and proceeded to pull on the unit trying to free it. It didn't come so I twisted a little then tried to pry it gently with a small screw driver. Still wouldn't come off so I increased the force ever so slightly until everything came flying off. Heat sink, fan and CPU. Needless to say that Gateway was a wonderful paper weight from that moment on. Stupid Gateway.

BuffaloX
December 11th, 2009, 04:14 AM
Wow that's one sturdy CPU.
Good rescue despite all the mishaps. :popcorn:

You got lucky this time, cracked corners can easily kill the CPU, since it easily breaks the internal wiring.
Bended pins are usually not a problem just a pain. Unless they are bend so they are completely laying down flat, then they may brake when you try to straighten them. But even if a pin breaks, you may salvage the cpu by inserting the broken pin or a straightened piece of paper-clip in the socket hole for the lost pin, and putting a small piece of alu foil over it. But I'm not sure that's in the manual. :P


I run into this all the time with cheap thermal paste, It's best to just unlock the CPU and remove the heatsink and cpu as a unit. Then you can use a exacto knife (or a steak knife) to pry them apart. acetone or Vodka works good for cleaning the paste of (don't use rubbing alcohol as it has baby oil in it).

As you found out a CPU can take quite a beating as long as it doesn't get a static zap.

Many heatsinks block the handle to release the CPU from the socket.

Yes you can use a knife, but be very careful not to crack the CPU housing.

The problem is not just cheap thermal paste, I've experienced this with Arctic Silver too.


Next time you find yourself applying ludicrous amounts of force to a CPU, stop. Put the heatsink back on and run the thing for 10 minutes or so. Generally some heat will help soften up thermal paste.

Your friend needs to read up on the proper amount of thermal paste. More is not better.

That sounds like a good trick, and even if the motherboard is "dead", there's a good chance the CPU is actually running anyway.
If that's not the case, I suppose a hairdryer could be used.

I've found that the best way to loosen stuck heatsinks, is to turn them like you would turn a screw.

Pulling them clear off the socket has worked for me too a couple of times.

blueshiftoverwatch
December 11th, 2009, 10:05 AM
the heat sink being clogged with cigarette tar.
Did he put his ash tray directly in front of the case's intake fan?

Sin@Sin-Sacrifice
December 11th, 2009, 10:52 AM
Heh... I stepped on my buddy's old pentium when he was blindly tearing apart his system. He freaked out. I calmly pointed out that his 6 pin wasn't pushed in all the way, bent the pins back, which almost all looked like lightning bolts, slapped everything back together and he used that system for a long time. I use to be scared of touching PC innards because of the propaganda about them being fragile (I was scared to put the ram in a system I built when I was a lad because it wouldn't just slide in) and although they are, somewhat, I've found that you don't have to use rubber gloves, masks, tweezers, and a painter's touch with them. Hell... I touch a grounded... uhh... thing and have at it.

I actually saw a maintenance guy in a factory I worked for try to replace a circuit board for a motion sensor and while shoving it in it's slot cracked it in half (it was long and skinny)... he looked up at me, laughed and pushed the one half in with the other. I was freaked a little as the press operator because this thing stopped a 600 lb puller from screaming into me at about 30 mph when I stepped in front of it. He put it all back together and tested it... worked perfectly and probably still does today. I couldn't stop thinking that thing was going to crush me because I had to step in front of it about 400 times a night.

3rdalbum
December 11th, 2009, 10:58 AM
Processors usually have a 3 year warranty, don't they? I've never heard of a processor dying of old age either.

It does surprise me that it survived two drops onto the ground; that's pretty good.

sideaway
December 11th, 2009, 11:03 AM
The old AMDs are beasts though... I've had a similar account with my old athlon 2000+ still working today my friend :D Been through two motherboards though :P

Gizenshya
December 11th, 2009, 11:46 AM
Hey, it works with beer....

I second this motion!

With thermal compound, the less the merrier. The idea is to put a very thin coating that is just enough to "connect" both surfaces at all points (even coat, no air bubbles), while not actually having the metals physically touch eachother (they are connected va the compound). Thermal compound doesn't dissipate heat, it effectively increases surface area of both surfaces, while conducting heat between the surfaces. This just allows the heatsink to more effectively "get" the heat from the processor. So that's why you need to get it as thin as possible-- you want to keep your heatsink as physically close as possible to the object (processor) that needs cooling.

pea-sized? A pea-sized glob of thermal compound is enough to do 10 processors, with lots to spare. Even a slight amount over what is necessary can easily reduce conduction effeciency by 20-50%. In other words, too much isn't better, it actually acts as insulation between the processor and heatsink. In my last build, I thought I got the compound thin enough, but I was disappointed with my overclocking results. I wiped the compound (just a paper towel), and reseated the heatsink on the processor. Now i'm running 10% faster and cooler.

If you ever see anything squishing out the side, when you put the heatsink on it, take it off! you have waaaay too much.

To remove the heatsink from processor, you don't pull, you slide ;)

Think of it like getting a strong magnet off a piece of steel. Sliding takes only a fraction of the force that pulling does.

There shouldn't be much static friction at all, but even if there is, a little twist before the slide will get rid of that :)

It is worth noting, though, that some manufacturers don't use thermal compound. They actually adhere the heatsink to the processor, and these really shouldn't be removed. They can rip the processor itself right off its board (leaving the base in the mobo). I don't think they use those anymore, though. The only thing I've seen recently are thermal compound on the little metal shields over the processor. These (the new ones) are much easier to work with, and much safer, IMO.