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earfer
December 5th, 2009, 07:14 AM
Lets get stright to the point~!

What does...




If you have /boot on a separate partition, that need's to be mounted aswell. For reference, /dev/sda2 will be used.

$ sudo mount /dev/sda2 /mnt/boot Make sure you don't mix these up, pay attention to the output of FDISK

means?

I mean what does it mean when it said "If you have /boot on a separate partition"? is it a ext? or a swap partition?

Heres what my hardrive looks like...


Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 774 16904 129572257+ 83 Linux
/dev/sda2 * 16905 16917 102400 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda3 16917 29652 102294528 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda4 29653 30401 6016342+ 5 Extended
/dev/sda5 29653 30401 6016311 82 Linux swap / Solaris


Thanks in Advance~

wesleybailey
December 5th, 2009, 07:26 AM
When you install linux, some distributions give you the option to install different parts of the linux os, on different mount points.

In this example all the linux files reside on the partition /sda1


Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda1 8.9G 905M 7.6G 11% /


You could also split up the linux files like this.


Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda1 8.9G 905M 7.6G 11% /
/dev/sda2 8.9G 905M 7.6G 11% /boot


Hope this explains that quote

presence1960
December 5th, 2009, 07:26 AM
Lets get stright to the point~!

What does...



means?

I mean what does it mean when it said "If you have /boot on a separate partition"? is it a ext? or a swap partition?

Heres what my hardrive looks like...


Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 774 16904 129572257+ 83 Linux
/dev/sda2 * 16905 16917 102400 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda3 16917 29652 102294528 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda4 29653 30401 6016342+ 5 Extended
/dev/sda5 29653 30401 6016311 82 Linux swap / Solaris


Thanks in Advance~
within your sda1 partition is a directory named /boot. Most people install Ubuntu this way which is the default. But for various reasons some create a separate boot partition in which that directory which would have been in / (root) of ubuntu now becomes a separate partition of it's own.

One good reason to utilize this is when Ubuntu will be installed outside the area readable by older BIOS versions(usually 137 GB but less for really older BIOS). This is a limitation of BIOS not Ubuntu. If there is not a BIOS update that will fix this then one must utilize the separate boot partition in order to get ubuntu to boot.

Example: you have a BIOS with a readable area limit of 137 GB. You have a 250 GB hard disk and your existing partitions take up the first 200 GB. If you install Ubuntu after those your BIOS will not be able to read the files necessary to boot Ubuntu and thus will get a GRUB error. For those not willing to redo their partition table and put Ubuntu on the front of the disk they can shrink a partition and create a boot partition from the freed space which will fall within the 137 GB area readable by BIOS. This will allow Ubuntu to boot.

earfer
December 5th, 2009, 07:27 AM
Yes thankyou. But may i ask how do you found out which is on boot?

presence1960
December 5th, 2009, 07:35 AM
Yes thankyou. But may i ask how do you found out which is on boot?

I don't quite understand this question.

When you install Ubuntu and use the manual option at the Prepare disk space window you create a boot partition (if you haven't already done so), highlight it and set the Filesystem type, tick the format box and in the drop down box for mount point select /boot. When you set all partitions and are ready to install the files that are in boot directory on a default install will be placed in the separate boot partition. This is how to create an install utilizing a separate /boot partition.

Hope this answer it. if not rephrase the question please.

wesleybailey
December 5th, 2009, 07:36 AM
.

earfer
December 5th, 2009, 07:38 AM
within your sda1 partition is a directory named /boot. Most people install Ubuntu this way which is the default. But for various reasons some create a separate boot partition in which that directory which would have been in / (root) of ubuntu now becomes a separate partition of it's own.

One good reason to utilize this is when Ubuntu will be installed outside the area readable by older BIOS versions(usually 137 GB but less for really older BIOS). This is a limitation of BIOS not Ubuntu. If there is not a BIOS update that will fix this then one must utilize the separate boot partition in order to get ubuntu to boot.

Example: you have a BIOS with a readable area limit of 137 GB. You have a 250 GB hard disk and your existing partitions take up the first 200 GB. If you install Ubuntu after those your BIOS will not be able to read the files necessary to boot Ubuntu and thus will get a GRUB error. For those not willing to redo their partition table and put Ubuntu on the front of the disk they can shrink a partition and create a boot partition from the freed space which will fall within the 137 GB area readable by BIOS. This will allow Ubuntu to boot.


Im sorry but can you please simplyfy that? from expert to nub or midy?
Ive lost you~!

some more random info:

- in the code sda 2 is system reserved and sda 3 is windows 7.
- sda 2 has a flag = boot

earfer
December 5th, 2009, 07:40 AM
I don't quite understand this question.

When you install Ubuntu and use the manual option at the Prepare disk space window you create a boot partition (if you haven't already done so), highlight it and set the Filesystem type, tick the format box and in the drop down box for mount point select /boot. When you set all partitions and are ready to install the files that are in boot directory on a default install will be placed in the separate boot partition. This is how to create an install utilizing a separate /boot partition.

Hope this answer it. if not rephrase the question please.

aha sorry thats for wesleybailey at first but dw about it. it was a stupid question.

presence1960
December 5th, 2009, 07:42 AM
Im sorry but can you please simplyfy that? from expert to nub or midy?
Ive lost you~!

some more random info:

- in the code sda 2 is system reserved and sda 3 is windows 7.
- sda 2 has a flag = boot

That is the simple version, maybe reading on BIOS will help you undestand.

System reserved in Windows 7 is the partition that contains windows 7 boot files. I may be incorrect but I think Windows 7 does that when installing to a clean hard disk. If installing it to an existing partition I don't think it creates a system reserved partition. At least it didn't when I installed Win 7 RC to an existing partition on my rig.

earfer
December 5th, 2009, 07:47 AM
That is the simple version, maybe reading on BIOS will help you undestand.

System reserved in Windows 7 is the partition that contains windows 7 boot files. I may be incorrect but I think Windows 7 does that when installing to a clean hard disk. If installing it to an existing partition I don't think it creates a system reserved partition. At least it didn't when I installed Win 7 RC to an existing partition on my rig.

ok lemme give more info about what i mean...(i guess i wasn't "straight to the point*)

I installed Ubunut 9.10 (Grub 2) on the whole entire disk.
Then i made another partition that is for win 7.
I installed it i did the guide to reinstall grub 2 but didnt get far.


https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Grub2#Recover%20Grub%202%20via%20LiveCD

I stopped when it told me to...




If you have /boot on a separate partition, that need's to be mounted aswell. For reference, /dev/sda2 will be used.

$ sudo mount /dev/sda2 /mnt/boot Make sure you don't mix these up, pay attention to the output of FDISK

I didnt know what /boot and which sda it was.

hope i made a little clearer for everyone.

garvinrick4
December 5th, 2009, 07:48 AM
Is this what you want. Every partition to boot on sda1 called system.
Extended sda3 is Linux and inside of extended partitions is 2 linux partions
and 2 swap partitions. But all the boots are in the grub2 on
partition sda1. sda2 is windows 7 sda4 is what linux sees as
a vista boot, it is the D: drive in windows the image of the O.S.
to reinstall window 7 with.
So 1 for boot. 1 for windows. 1 for D: in windows.
1 large extended partition for linux.
2 partitions inside of linux partion and 2 swap partitions in side of extended partition.

4 a grand total of 8 partitions for 3 OS's.
The 2 swap partitions are for virtual memory basically in the 2 linux systems.
All Windows are NTSF format.

Gparted software will do it all for you when you load Ubuntu software.



Disk /dev/sda: 320.1 GB, 320072933376 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xe7e8e0a0

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 1 26 203776 7 HPFS/NTFS
Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/sda2 26 26132 209696248 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda3 26133 37330 89947935 5 Extended
/dev/sda4 37331 38914 12709888 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda5 32107 37111 40202631 83 Linux
/dev/sda6 37112 37330 1759086 82 Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sda7 26133 31856 45977967 83 Linux
/dev/sda8 31857 32106 2008093+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris

Partition table entries are not in disk order
rick@rick-laptop:~$

presence1960
December 5th, 2009, 07:49 AM
ok lemme give more info about what i mean...(i guess i wasn't "straight to the point*)

I installed Ubunut 9.10 (Grub 2) on the whoe entire disk.
Then i made another partition that is for win 7.
I installed it i did the guide to reinstall grub 2 but didnt get far.


https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Grub2#Recover%20Grub%202%20via%20LiveCD

I stopped when it told me to...



I didnt know what /boot and which sda it was.

hope i made a little clearer for everyone.
If you don't have a separate boot partition skip that set of instruction. You want to use sda1 and then install GRUB to /dev/sda.

earfer
December 5th, 2009, 07:54 AM
Is this what you want. Every partition to boot on sda1 called system.
Extended sda3 is Linux and inside of extended partitions is 2 linux partions
and 2 swap partitions. But all the boots are in the grub2 on
partition sda1. sda2 is windows 7 sda4 is what linux sees as
a vista boot, it is the D: drive in windows the image of the O.S.
to reinstall window 7 with.
So 1 for boot. 1 for windows. 1 for D: in windows.
1 large extended partition for linux.
2 partitions inside of linux partion and 2 swap partitions in side of extended partition.

4 a grand total of 8 partitions for 3 OS's.
The 2 swap partitions are for virtual memory basically in the 2 linux systems.
All Windows are NTSF format.

Gparted software will do it all for you when you load Ubuntu software.



Disk /dev/sda: 320.1 GB, 320072933376 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xe7e8e0a0

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 1 26 203776 7 HPFS/NTFS
Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/sda2 26 26132 209696248 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda3 26133 37330 89947935 5 Extended
/dev/sda4 37331 38914 12709888 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda5 32107 37111 40202631 83 Linux
/dev/sda6 37112 37330 1759086 82 Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sda7 26133 31856 45977967 83 Linux
/dev/sda8 31857 32106 2008093+ 82 Linux swap / Solaris

Partition table entries are not in disk order
rick@rick-laptop:~$

WAHHH!!! DONT GET YOU!!!!:-k


If you don't have a separate boot partition skip that set of instruction.

But how do you check if you DO or do not have a seperate boot partition?

garvinrick4
December 5th, 2009, 08:09 AM
sudo fdisk -l that is a small L not an l


The partition with the * is the boot partition. How is that.

earfer
December 5th, 2009, 08:14 AM
sudo fdisk -l that is a small L not an l


The partition with the * is the boot partition. How is that.

So thats the seperate partition? aka (/boot)?

so do i type in the terminal:


$ sudo mount /dev/sda2 /mnt/boot

like that?

u.b.u.n.t.u
December 5th, 2009, 10:41 AM
I installed Ubunut 9.10 (Grub 2) on the whole entire disk.
Then i made another partition that is for win 7.


Better to install Windows 7 on the entire HDD and then install Ubuntu 9.10 on a partition(s).

presence1960
December 5th, 2009, 02:36 PM
So thats the seperate partition? aka (/boot)?

so do i type in the terminal:


$ sudo mount /dev/sda2 /mnt/boot

like that?

NO...

This is fdisk from your original post:


Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 774 16904 129572257+ 83 Linux
/dev/sda2 * 16905 16917 102400 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda3 16917 29652 102294528 7 HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda4 29653 30401 6016342+ 5 Extended
/dev/sda5 29653 30401 6016311 82 Linux swap / Solaris

You have 2 Linux partitions- root (sda1) & swap (sda5). You do not have a separate boot partition. You would know anyway if you did have a separate boot partition because you would have specifically had to create one manually during the install of Ubuntu. Just skip those instructions.

The * in fdisk denotes a boot flag not a boot partition. Windows needs a boot flag turned on to be able to boot, Linux does not.
One last time you do not have a boot partition disregard the set of instructions dealing with the extra boot partition.

darkod
December 5th, 2009, 02:49 PM
Just do what presence says. You would know if you have separate /boot because you would need to create that manually during install.
Your /dev/sda2 is the 100MB partition win7 creates, you can see it's ntfs type.

garvinrick4
December 5th, 2009, 04:09 PM
Where is the D: partition for Windows 7? If that was XP would
look right? Should there not be a System about 100 meg. A Windows
7 and a D: Linux reads the D: in 7 as Vista it cannot tell the difference but that is the image of 7's OS.
Then an extended, a linux and a swap. That would be 6 and their
are 5 in her fdisk.

What am I missing here?

darkod
December 5th, 2009, 04:13 PM
Where is the D: partition for Windows 7? If that was XP would
look right? Should there not be a System about 100 meg. A Windows
7 and a D: Linux reads the D: in 7 as Vista it cannot tell the difference but that is the image of 7's OS.
Then an extended, a linux and a swap. That would be 6 and their
are 5 in her fdisk.

What am I missing here?

Don't know.
/dev/sda1 /
/dev/sda2 100MB win7 boot (doesn't show with letter in win7)
/dev/sda3 win7 system C:
/dev/sda5 swap

What are you looking for?

garvinrick4
December 5th, 2009, 06:13 PM
If it is Windows 7 I was looking for the D: partition that it needs
to put its image in. The recovery is a default. The D: for now Linux sees
as Vista in boot menu. Cannot tell deference for time being. It is not in her
"fdisk -l". I saw the Vista in my install of 7 so investigated. No big deal.

darkod
December 5th, 2009, 06:18 PM
I think you are mixed up by the fact that most branded machines these days ship with recovery/restore partition with an image of the system as it comes from factory/dealers. But this is not always the case. Plus you are free to delete that recovery partition if you have another way to install your windows OS if you need to.
Personally I consider these partitions useless. Most of them literary wipe the hdd and create the same setup as when it was bought. Which means it would not only destroy a second OS but it will also destroy all your windows data even if you never had linux and use it only for windows. That is no way to restore OS, IMHO. If it shipped with a Windows DVD, that would give you options to really repair your OS. But try telling that to MS and explain how much inconvenience they create for their own customers who paid for their license fair and square.

garvinrick4
December 9th, 2009, 10:17 PM
Have truple boot with Windows 7, 9.10 and 10.04. Used the image of windows 7 in grub called Vista and reinstalled Windows 7 as an experiment to see if it just reinstalled on its
own partition or cleaned whole drive. It just saw its NTSF partition and left my Extended
partition alone. Boot partition came out fine. D: partition fine, just overwrote the C: partition with fresh install. THIS WAS MY OWN EXPERIMENT AND DO NOT GUARANTEE ANY
OTHERS. I just wanted see what happened, curiosity.
Machine a Hp- G71-34 OUS Had to make my own Disks when opened box. 3 DVD's a one opportunity thing to make disk image. Can make all the repair disks I want. Used
g-parted to configure partitions. Linux see's D: drive as Vista in GRUB2 it is your Windows
7 image on internal Disk. Also has a recovery boot which requires your self made recovery
disk.
I do seem to use Linux OS all the time now but with size of drives now a days I see no reason to not leave a partition for OS that came loaded on machine.