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Rumor
February 22nd, 2006, 04:10 PM
My wife and I are both voracious readers, devouring anything from the back of a cereal box to novels by the hundreds. Below is a short list of some that are on my re-read list. These are books I have read more than once because they are just that good.

What books do you read for enjoyment? Fiction? Non-Fiction? Share your list (Author, Title(s), Genre). I always 'discover' new authors or books when I read what others folk enjoy.

My list:
Author: Guy Gavriel Kay
Title: The Sarantine Mosaic (Vol. 1 - Sailing to Sarantium; Vol. 2 - Lord of Emperors)
Genre: Fantasy
Exceptional characters, loads of intrigue. Two of my very fvorite books.
Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0061059900/sr=8-8/qid=1140618115/ref=pd_bbs_8/102-3891646-3189733?%5Fencoding=UTF8)

Author: Tad Williams
Title: Memory, Sorrow and Thorn (Trilogy: The Dragonbone Chair; The Stone of Farewell; To Green Angel Tower)
Genre: Fantasy
IMO, the BEST fantasy trilogy written
Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000BSFQUA/qid=1140618484/sr=2-2/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_2/102-3891646-3189733?s=books&v=glance&n=283155)

Author: Lois McMaster Bujold
Title: Shards of Honor
Genre: Science Fiction
This is the first of Bujold's books and is the real beginning of the Miles Vorkosigan stories. This book is a love story, but SUCH a love story. Both my wife and I have re-read this book many, many times.
Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1886778205/qid=1140618729/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-3891646-3189733?s=books&v=glance&n=283155)

Author: Stephen King
Title: The Stand
Genre: Fiction (horror?)
I first read the stand on Thanksgiving break in college in 1980 (I think). It was the first "End of humanity as we know it" book I'd read, and it captivated me. It is an epic struggle between good and evil.
Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0385199570/qid=1140618873/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-3891646-3189733?s=books&v=glance&n=283155)

Author: David Eddings
Title: The Belgariad & The Mallorean (10-book 'series')
Genre: Epic fantasy
David Eddings (along with his wife Leigh) wrote first The Belgariad, the story of Garion, an orphanded farm boy, and his rise to power. Then they wrote the second series, The Mallorean, continuing his story. I am not a fan of their recent efforts, but these two series, and the first Sparhawk series (The Elenium) deserve the attention of anyone who enjoys well written fantasy.
Belgariad: Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0345456327/qid=1140619058/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-3891646-3189733?s=books&v=glance&n=283155)
Mallorean: Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0345483863/qid=1140619235/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-3891646-3189733?s=books&v=glance&n=283155)
Elenium: Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0345367693/qid=1140619281/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-3891646-3189733?s=books&v=glance&n=283155)

Author: George R. R. Martin
Title: A Song of Ice and Fire (current series beginning with A Game of Thrones)
Genre: Fantasy
Despite the interminably long wait we had for the most recent volume in this series, Martin's bleak story is very, very, very good. I just hope the wait for the next book is not another several years.
Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0553573403/qid=1140619489/sr=2-2/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_2/102-3891646-3189733?s=books&v=glance&n=283155)

Author: Robert Jordan
Title: The Wheel of Time (current series beginnign with The Eye of the World)
Genre: Fantasy
Like the series above, I sincerely hope that Mr. Jordan lives long enough to finish this story. Epic does not even begin to describe it.
Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0812511816/qid=1140619609/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-3891646-3189733?s=books&v=glance&n=283155)

Author: John Sandford
Title: Certain Prey & Mortal Prey
Genre: Suspense
John Sandford's series built around his character, Lucas Davenport, is one of my favorite reads. These two, in particular, stand out in the series.
Certain Prey: Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/039914496X/qid=1140619801/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/102-3891646-3189733?s=books&v=glance&n=283155)
Mortal Prey: Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000W70EM/qid=1140619862/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-3891646-3189733?s=books&v=glance&n=283155)

Author: Dean Koontz
Title: Odd Thomas
Genre: Suspense
This book introduces a character whose given name is Odd. And he is rather odd in that, like the boy in the Sixth Sense, he can see dead people. The cast of characters, including the ghost of Elvis, makes this book, and the second book: Forever Odd, very enjoyable to read.
Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0553802496/qid=1140620228/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-3891646-3189733?s=books&v=glance&n=283155)

I'm sure I could go on, but most of you have probably stopped reading already :-D

Bragador
February 22nd, 2006, 04:35 PM
I like to read educational books and science fiction/fantasy books.

I feel like only reading fictions is kind of a waste of time so I also educate myself on the side. I have already a political book to read this summer and I want to find myself a book on logic.

I also like to read Neil Gaiman's the Sandman. It's a wonderful series.

vertigo
February 22nd, 2006, 04:48 PM
I read absoluetly anything I can lay my hands on. The current reading list is:

Author: Robert Rankin
Title: The most amazing man who ever lived
Genre: Fantasy

Author: Brain Lumley
Title: Psychomok
Genre: Horror/fantasy
3rd book in a series (psycomech/pychosphere/psycomok)

Recomendations: anything by Terry Pratchett, Robert Rankin, Robert Heinlien, Patricia Cornwell, Frank or Brian Herbert and Kevin J Anderson

There are to many good books out there at the moment and I'm working my way through as many as possible.

raublekick
February 22nd, 2006, 04:53 PM
Right now I'm reading America: The Book - A Citizen's Guide to Democracy Inaction. It's a really funny take on American politics, but a little crude at times (not that I care, but others might).

Last semester I was fortunate enough to have some classes that had interesting required reading:
Rationality in Action - John Searle, an interesting account of the philosophy of the mind.
Paradise Lost - John Milton, great epic about Satan's plot for the fall of man.
Utopia - Thomas More, I went into this thinking it actually would provide me with a utopian land. But in the end I just saw some great ideas and a world that would be hellishly boring.

Over winter break I read Lucky Wander Boy, a tale about a normal dude who gains an obsession with a game from his youth, and has a philosophical outlook on certain games and gaming in general. It's an easy read and only a few bucks on Amazon. If you like videogames, I highly suggest this.

This semester I have no desire to read anything serious, because I just want to put my brain at ease when I can.

Next on the list is probably some sci-fi.

mostwanted
February 22nd, 2006, 04:56 PM
George Orwell - 1984

I think it's the best book ever written. It seems everyone who reads it is instantly blessed with a very liberal mindset :p

I can also recommend:

George Orwell - Animal Farm
Stanislaw Lem - Solaris
Aldous Huxley - Brave New World
Aldous Huxley - Ape and Essence

KingBahamut
February 22nd, 2006, 05:01 PM
Hmmmm....This is a relatively easy one.

RA Salvatore - Pick one, Like them all.
Steven Brust - Jehereg and Taltos are personal favorites, but the rest are good


Jack Chaulker - Well World books , Nathan Brazil is the man.
Larry Niven - Ringwold Series
Jack Vance - The Dirdir, The Pnume
Fred Hoyle - The Black Cloud

And as an added bonus, the person that can tell me what the last 4 authors share in common, and its a biggie, gets major bonus points with me. Youd have to be an old time geek like me to probably get it though, still, a worthy challenge.

Rumor
February 22nd, 2006, 05:31 PM
Jack Chaulker - Well World books , Nathan Brazil is the man.


Have you read Chalker's "Rings of the Master" series? I found that one especially satisfying.

Rumor
February 22nd, 2006, 05:34 PM
George Orwell - 1984

I think it's the best book ever written. It seems everyone who reads it is instantly blessed with a very liberal mindset :p


Give Ira Levin's "This Perfect Day" a try. A very neat take on the Orwellian story. And another novel my wife and I have both read several times.
Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0394448588/sr=8-1/qid=1140625941/ref=pd_bbs_1/102-3891646-3189733?%5Fencoding=UTF8)

endersshadow
February 22nd, 2006, 05:34 PM
Running Money - Andy Kessler
The Ender Series (all books) - Orson Scott Card
Lord of the Rings - JRR Tolkein
Catch-22 - Joseph Heller
Mere Christianity - C.S. Lewis
1776 - David McCullough

All great books :-D

Master Shake
February 22nd, 2006, 06:05 PM
Books I have read...

The Adventures of Jonathan Gullible: A Free-Market Odyssey -- Ken Schooland
The Tripods Trilogy -- John Christopher
Of MIce and Men -- John Stienbeck
Give Me A Break! -- John Stossel
The Devil in the White City -- Erik Larson (This book is REALLY good. It juxtaposes the man who would build Chicago's 1893 World's Fair against the serial killer that set up shop right outside.)
Uncle John's Bathroom Reader #17
The Mensa Guide to Casino Gambling
Sudoku for your Coffee Break (OK, so its a book of puzzles)

weasel fierce
February 22nd, 2006, 06:15 PM
Various fantasy and scifi, with Jack Vance (Dying earth, lyonesse) and Heinlein as favourites

bonzodog
February 22nd, 2006, 07:28 PM
I have nearly all of Terry Pratchetts books here, my favourite of them is 'Lords and ladies'; "lots of hey nonny nonny and blood all over the place"
I have all five parts of the Hitchhikers Guide Trilogy, By Douglas Adams.
Best non-fiction I have ever read has to be 'Just For Fun' about the Linux revolution and Linus Torvalds.

XDevHald
February 22nd, 2006, 07:29 PM
Anything about security, mainly researching articles and reading them to stay up to date on platform development of linux.

ciaran.mooney
February 22nd, 2006, 07:33 PM
Currently Reading

Author : Neil Gaiman
Title : American Gods
Description : Not quite sure what its about...

The books I would reccomend would be

Author : George Orwell
Title : 1984
Description : Modern classic showing how big brother becomes integral to our lives.

Author : Joseph Hellner
Title : Catch 22
Description : Very weird book, helps I'm the son of a squaddie so get some of the more obscure humour. Its a book you have to work at to read, but is enjoyable none the less.

KingBahamut
February 22nd, 2006, 07:34 PM
No body took a shot at the KB quiz for the day, sigh. =)

Part 2 of my post -

Orielly anything.

Rumor
February 22nd, 2006, 07:50 PM
No body took a shot at the KB quiz for the day, sigh. =)


Hmm. I know that Niven and Vance have won Hugo Awards, but I don't know about the other two.

KingBahamut
February 22nd, 2006, 07:58 PM
Nope, Niven, Chaulker, Hoyle, and Vance.....

All have characters that Appear in Barlowe's Guide to Extraterrestrials, of which I have a hardback copy as well.

bored2k
February 22nd, 2006, 07:59 PM
Currently reading: Sams Learn C++ in 21 days, 5th edition.

I usually enjoy computer related books, manga and the Bible.

One of my favorite book of all time:
Stupid White Men ...and Other Sorry Excuses for the State of the Nation! (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0060392452/103-4691408-1127829?v=glance&n=283155)

Kimm
February 22nd, 2006, 08:06 PM
I LOVE fantacy and that pretty much makes up everything I read.

The Belgariad and the Mallorean by David Eddings are wounderfull!! (see first post to)

But my absolute favorite book series has to be (all three books):

The Farseer: Assasin's Apprentice
The Farseer: Royal Assasin
The Farseer: Assasin's Quest

Written by: Robin Hobb

It ROCKS! Never have I been able to get so deep inside a book, I just dont ever wana put it down, but I have a dilema, I dont wana finnish the last book :cry:

Rumor
February 22nd, 2006, 08:49 PM
But my absolute favorite book series has to be (all three books):

The Farseer: Assasin's Apprentice
The Farseer: Royal Assasin
The Farseer: Assasin's Quest

Written by: Robin Hobb

It ROCKS! Never have I been able to get so deep inside a book, I just dont ever wana put it down, but I have a dilema, I dont wana finnish the last book :cry:

Yes, I've read the farseer trilogy and really enjoyed it too. It seemed that Ms. Hobb was bound and determined to see just how much abuse she could dish out on Fitz, the protagonist of the story.
I'd also recommend her Liveship Traders trilogy. The characters are richly developed and the story is very engaging.

Rumor
February 22nd, 2006, 08:53 PM
Nope, Niven, Chaulker, Hoyle, and Vance.....

All have characters that Appear in Barlowe's Guide to Extraterrestrials, of which I have a hardback copy as well.

Well, humpf.

So, do you prefer Niven alone or when he collaborates with Pournelle, Barnes or someone else? I think my favorites are his collaborative efforts. Footfall and Lucifer's Hammer in particular. I loved Footfall . . . elephants from outer space! :D

ember
February 22nd, 2006, 08:58 PM
Hmm .. it seems the correlation between linux and fantasy literature is quite strong ;)

Well, so I add my recent books, generally I tend to read two or three books at the same time, the last were:

The Deadline: A novel about project management
DeMarco, Tom
Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0932633390/sr=8-2/qid=1140637757/ref=pd_bbs_2/103-6110634-8299802?%5Fencoding=UTF8)

Waltzing with bears: Managing risk on software projects
DeMacro, Tom
Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0932633609/sr=8-4/qid=1140637757/ref=pd_bbs_4/103-6110634-8299802?%5Fencoding=UTF8)

Slack : Getting Past Burnout, Busywork, and the Myth of Total Efficiency
DeMacro, Tom
Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0767907698/sr=8-3/qid=1140637757/ref=pd_bbs_3/103-6110634-8299802?%5Fencoding=UTF8)

Advanced PHP programming
Schlossnagle, George
Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0672325616/qid=1140638002/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/103-6110634-8299802?s=books&v=glance&n=283155)

The pragmatic programmer
Hunt, Andrew
Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/020161622X/qid=1140638071/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/103-6110634-8299802?s=books&v=glance&n=283155)

and also out of personal interest:

The Last Templar, The DaVince Code, The Swarm and some other of that sort. Also some scientific books about qumran, some esoterical book about the templar knights and the holy grail.

Actually I notice, I read quite much the last months ;)

Deaf_Head
February 22nd, 2006, 09:34 PM
Too much to read, not enough time to even list my picks out of all I've liked. So I'll recommend just 1 book: On the Road by Jack Kerouac.

Master Shake
February 22nd, 2006, 09:44 PM
Currently reading: Sams Learn C++ in 21 days, 5th edition.



Ugh... WHile that book did teach me a bit about C++ programming, I was really turned off by the authors fixation with cats.

Bragador
February 22nd, 2006, 10:09 PM
Hmm .. it seems the correlation between linux and fantasy literature is quite strong ;)

Yeah I'm impressed too...

I'm the only one preferring science fiction it seems. I thought it would be a more popular genre for people like us who enjoy technology. Oh well...

ember
February 22nd, 2006, 10:36 PM
Yeah I'm impressed too...

I'm the only one preferring science fiction it seems. I thought it would be a more popular genre for people like us who enjoy technology. Oh well...

Well, I also guess we have a high correlation holding for linux and roleplaying, so I expected this already.

Yet, if you like science fiction, consider to read Lem (if you haven't already done so), unfortunately Amazon.com does not seem to have all the good works in Englisch. The German titles of my favourites are "Der Unbesiegbare", "Also sprache GOLEM" and "Frieden auf Erden". All excellent pieces of true science fiction (actually I miss the science part in most modern science fiction books). Also consider "Der letzte seiner Art" by Andreas Eschbach (I guess this one is only available in German).

Rumor
February 23rd, 2006, 12:00 AM
Yeah I'm impressed too...

I'm the only one preferring science fiction it seems. I thought it would be a more popular genre for people like us who enjoy technology. Oh well...

A few really good science fiction reads for you then :-)

Someone already mentioned the Ender's Game books, particularly "Speaker for the Dead."

I also really, REALLY enjoyed Orson Scott Card's "Homecoming" series.
Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0812532597/104-0334716-7506356?n=283155)
I found it to be an excellent read.

Isaac Asimov's "Foundation" books should be a MUST READ for any science fiction fan.

Also, C. S. Friedman's "This Alien Shore" Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0886777992/qid=1140649039/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-0334716-7506356?s=books&v=glance&n=283155)
I thought it was a really good book.

One more: Arthur C. Clarke's "Rendezvous with Rama" was a lot of fun to read.
Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0553287893/qid=1140649125/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/104-0334716-7506356?s=books&v=glance&n=283155)

direwolf
February 23rd, 2006, 12:37 AM
The Five Great Dialogues - my favorite book.
My favorite version is that published in 1942 by Walter J. Black, INC. for the Classics Club
translated by B. Jowett
edited and introduction by Louise Ropes Loomis

I like both fiction and non-fiction. My favorite author of fiction is probably Dean Koontz - cheesy, I know.

Currently reading:

Greenspan's Fraud: How Two Decades of His Policies Have Undermined the Global Economy by Ravi Batra

polo_step
February 23rd, 2006, 07:02 AM
Until I got this blessed notebook I read about a book a day, so I covered a lot of ground.

At the moment, I'm reading Pol Pot -- Anatomy of a Nightmare by Philip Short, Imperial Grunts by Robert D. Kaplan, Kolyma Tales by Varlam Shalamov and The Looking Glass War by John le Carre.

The surprise to me was how good the writing is in the early le Carre books. I had been put off by the absurd movies based on the later books, so I never read him. The writing is exceptionally fine in the early books - hard to imagine they were written in notebooks (the paper kind!) in the MI5 cafeteria on lunch breaks.

No interest in Fantasy or Science Fiction ("Bad science and bad fiction," as Arthur C. Clarke once said...his stuff was good until he came out and ever after had to clumsily force gay characters into his stories).

Deaf_Head
February 23rd, 2006, 07:10 AM
No interest in Fantasy or Science Fiction ("Bad science and bad fiction," as Arthur C. Clarke once said...his stuff was good until he came out and ever after had to clumsily force gay characters into his stories).


lol, yeah. I like to pretend 2001 was his only book ...

alfonz
February 23rd, 2006, 07:17 AM
Orson Scott Card and his complete Ender's.... series, they blew me away... A great read.

The 12th Planet (The Earth Chronicles, Book 1) by Zecharia Sitchin - an interesting interpretation of THE "book"

Qrk
February 23rd, 2006, 07:30 AM
I just finished Memoirs of a Geisha for the third time. Very very good.

I also really liked "A Tree grows in Brooklin" and, really, anything memoir.

Deaf_Head
February 23rd, 2006, 07:33 AM
Hmm .. it seems the correlation between linux and fantasy literature is quite strong ;)


because your all geeks.

*As I look over at my copy of LOTR*

polo_step
February 23rd, 2006, 07:56 AM
I have to confess that I have read one book by Card, Magic Street, which was...well...strange. From what I gather, it's somewhat unlike his other stuff.

Luffield
February 23rd, 2006, 11:18 AM
Some of my favorites:

Norwegian Wood - Haruki Murakami
My Friend Matt and Hena the ***** - Adam Zameenzad
Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoevsky
History - Elsa Morante
Smilla's Sense of Snow - Peter Hoeg
Small Gods - Terry Pratchett
Leviathan - Paul Auster
Olivia, Olivia Saves the Circus and Olivia and the Missing Toy - Ian Falconer

Rita
February 23rd, 2006, 01:46 PM
I'm not a big reader of books, but if I do read one it would be from the Harry Potter series by JK Rowling.

graabein
February 23rd, 2006, 02:03 PM
I stopped reading fantasy when I was a teenager and turned to heavy classics like Dostoevsky and friends. I don't read as much as I used to. :confused:

My last three:

F. Scott Fitzgerald - This Side of Paradise
D.H. Lawrence - The Lost Girl
Nikolai Gogol - Dead Souls

fuscia
February 23rd, 2006, 02:18 PM
i'm an awful reader. i hate fiction, for one (i get a third of the way through a book and i'll think "wtf am i reading this for?"). so, for non-fiction, i read about anything i'm currently obsessed with. even then, i'm still a 'hearts of toast' reader. i skip all the boring crap (no matter how useful) and get right to the source of my fascination. just hand me a bag of flour and show me a picture of a cake. i'll figure it out...eventually.

that said, some of my favorite books have been...

tom sawyer
last of the mohicans
lolita

i've read about 500 plays. even though they're fiction, i like reading them with different voices for all the characters (don't understand people who don't read plays aloud).

Rumor
February 23rd, 2006, 03:59 PM
just hand me a bag of flour and show me a picture of a cake. i'll figure it out...eventually.

That line made me chuckle.


i've read about 500 plays. even though they're fiction, i like reading them with different voices for all the characters (don't understand people who don't read plays aloud).

I don't think I've read a play since my junior year in high school.

Rumor
February 23rd, 2006, 04:09 PM
***WARNING*** Off topic post ***WARNING***

I sometimes wonder if the "advent" of computers, video games, 500+ TV stations available via cable and whatnot will have an impact on reading.

I see it in my own kids, so it makes me wonder. My wife and I grew up reading. We got 3 TV stations, there were no video games, and the only computer I had ever seen filled an entire room in my high school.

For me, the Hardy Boys books were entertainment, escape, a great way to pass a rainy afternoon when you couldn't go out and play. I recall reading the Dune trilogy over a Christmas break and loving every minute of it.

These days, who needs books? Turn on the TV, boot up the PC and browse the web, fire up the Playstation. Books? What are those? How do you turn them on? Where do you plug them in?

I just wonder if the printed novel with actual pages you can turn is going to become extinct because of "glitzier" forms of entertainment and escape?

fuscia
February 23rd, 2006, 04:14 PM
I don't think I've read a play since my junior year in high school.

they're way more fun if you read them aloud. you don't have to be good at it, but most people are too uncomfortable to do it.

Mr.X
February 23rd, 2006, 04:17 PM
I like to read books \\:D/
--
Nah, i like fantasy books, most books i read are pretty long (500+ pages), and i like them that long :D
My bookcase is full of books, infact ive had to fill another bookcase with all the books i have :P

Rumor
February 23rd, 2006, 05:35 PM
they're way more fun if you read them aloud. you don't have to be good at it, but most people are too uncomfortable to do it.

My idea of a dream job would be to narrate audiobooks. I have read aloud to my wife for over 20 years and did a very brief stint in radio when I was in college. I have the voice, just not the "in" connections. :D

polo_step
February 27th, 2006, 07:53 PM
My idea of a dream job would be to narrate audiobooks. I have read aloud to my wife for over 20 years and did a very brief stint in radio when I was in college. I have the voice, just not the "in" connections. :D
There's no money in it (like Linux) to speak of. When I was between radio gigs, I looked into it.

If you really want to do this, there are numerous outfits that do recording for the blind, some of them working to pretty high standards.

polo_step
February 27th, 2006, 08:14 PM
...heavy classics like Dostoevsky
Dostoyevsky produced much genuinely terrible writing for quick money.

Like Dickens, much of what he wrote was rapidly-produced, rambling serial melodramas for lowbrow newspapers, made up as he went along. It was scarcely even edited -- and shows it.

I read Insulted and Injured a few weeks ago and was really amazed at what trash it was.

I've tried about six times to read The Demons, but just can't hack the cheap soap opera.

briancurtin
February 27th, 2006, 08:25 PM
i just bought "C++ Coding Standards" by herb sutter and andrei alexandrescu

i saw bjarne stroustrup's name on the cover (its a part of his series or something) and knew it had to be good

Stormy Eyes
February 27th, 2006, 08:36 PM
I like Alexandre Dumas, especially The Count of Monte Cristo. I also enjoy reading Terry Goodkind, and my wife and I both enjoyed Jacqueline Carey's Kushiel novels.

orlox
February 27th, 2006, 08:49 PM
Lately I have only picked books on math and computers, but normally I read a lot. My personal classics are:

-"Dracula" from Bram Stoker
-Gustave Flaubert's "Madame Bovary"
-Anything from Asimov's "foundation" series, and Frank Herbert's "Dune"
-Kafka's literature
-Tolkien's "the lord of the rings"

My last read was "Destination:Void" from Frank Herbert. An interesting book, but it's far away from the level of "DUNE"

Rumor
February 27th, 2006, 08:56 PM
I also enjoy reading Terry Goodkind, and my wife and I both enjoyed Jacqueline Carey's Kushiel novels.

I saw an earlier post from you today wherein you quoted Wizard's First Rule. I've read most of the books in that series. I don't think I've read the most recent two.

Someone recommended the Kushiel books to me perhaps a year ago. I've not read them yet. Maybe I'll look them up. Kushiel's Dart is the first?

Stormy Eyes
February 27th, 2006, 09:02 PM
Someone recommended the Kushiel books to me perhaps a year ago. I've not read them yet. Maybe I'll look them up. Kushiel's Dart is the first?

Right. Kushiel's Dart comes first, then Kushiel's Chosen and Kushiel's Avatar. Ms. Carey's also got another novel, Kushiel's Scion, coming out this June.

koolguynet
May 6th, 2006, 03:12 AM
I agree with bonzodog. I just finished reading "Just for Fun The Story of an Accidental Revolutionary" by Linus Torvalds and David Diamond. It is really interesting to hear first hand how this thing started. It gave me an even greater respect for Linux!

IYY
May 6th, 2006, 03:24 AM
tfm ;)

nightweave
May 7th, 2006, 06:15 PM
Started out reading Fantasy when I was a kid. Moved onto horror and light and fluffy science fiction. Now I read Science fiction when I am not reading Disc World Novels. Then to mix it up some historical fiction.

Biltong (Dee)
May 7th, 2006, 06:37 PM
The Cosmopolitan. :-)

Only kidding - I'd rather have my fingernails pulled out...

I'm into Canada at the moment, reading Tanya Huff and Kelley Armstrong. Both authors are into the Vampire / Werewolf genre but write well.

RavenOfOdin
May 7th, 2006, 08:27 PM
I'm very into historical literature.

TeeAhr1
May 8th, 2006, 02:26 PM
Author: Stephen King
Title: The Stand
Genre: Fiction (horror?)
I first read the stand on Thanksgiving break in college in 1980 (I think). It was the first "End of humanity as we know it" book I'd read, and it captivated me. It is an epic struggle between good and evil.
Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0385199570/qid=1140618873/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/102-3891646-3189733?s=books&v=glance&n=283155)
I'll compose a proper reply later (assuming work is slow today ;) ), but I just wanted to chime in with a "hell yeah!" I'm not a King fan (with very few exceptions; see also the Gunslinger series), but The Stand might be the best work of fiction I've ever read. The characters that he paints are so human, so three-dimensional. SPOILER ALERT: I cried a little the first time I read through it when Harold died. I think there's a little Harold in all of us, especially some of us geeks. There isn't a character in that book that you don't find yourself rooting for at one time or another.

magicmike
September 5th, 2006, 04:36 AM
Author: Fred Potts
Title: PDU-1
Genre: Linux/Unix Sci-Fi ?

You can read the book online or download the PDF here.
http://www.fepco.com/PDU-1.html (http://www.fepco.com/PDU-1.html)


I met the author a while back and he is a very interesting person. He has a collection of rare Unix & Linux computers. And writes his books through SGML (the precursor to HTML, DocBook & XML)

The book itself is an interesting read, I don't want to give the plot away but it does have a lot to do with UNIX.

Cyraxzz
September 5th, 2006, 05:48 AM
I prefer educational books more than fictional books.

Bezmotivnik
September 5th, 2006, 01:56 PM
I prefer educational books more than fictional books.
Who says fiction isn't educational?

I've learned a great deal from fiction.

skymt
September 5th, 2006, 02:34 PM
I read mostly science fiction, plus whatever you call Terry Pratchett's work (fantasy-satire?). Some favorites:

* David Brin's Uplift series (from #2 on, #1 was his first novel, and it showed)
* Isaac Asimov
* Peter F. Hamilton
* Neil Gaiman

slimdog360
September 5th, 2006, 02:37 PM
anything fantasy and some autobiographies.