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emigrant
December 1st, 2009, 10:20 PM
why is this? while there exists more stable distros?

Psumi
December 1st, 2009, 10:22 PM
Ease of Use and Installation?

earthpigg
December 1st, 2009, 10:23 PM
brown. gotta be the brown.

dragos240
December 1st, 2009, 10:24 PM
Ease of Use and Installation?

Yep. That's it. Even though there are other distros that do the same. Just as easily.

Psumi
December 1st, 2009, 10:25 PM
It comes in CD Form?

dragos240
December 1st, 2009, 10:27 PM
It comes in CD Form?

Many, many distros can be installed via CD. In fact most.

Skripka
December 1st, 2009, 10:27 PM
Yep. That's it. Even though there are other distros that do the same. Just as easily.

$$$$ backing, and a great deal of word of mouth.

Greg
December 1st, 2009, 10:28 PM
I think a lot of it is due to timing.

bela42
December 1st, 2009, 10:28 PM
Ubuntu has become the Linux mainstream. OMG!

A_T
December 1st, 2009, 10:30 PM
I always come back to Ubuntu because it makes gaining administrative rights easy - this can be a real pain on other distros.

Ric_NYC
December 1st, 2009, 10:30 PM
Most people don't like typing command lines. Most people don't like "tarballs"...
Ubuntu is the "anti-command lines", "anti-tarballs"...

Those who like command lines and tarballs had their distro ready to use many years ago... before Ubuntu was available.

lykwydchykyn
December 1st, 2009, 10:46 PM
Most people don't like typing command lines. Most people don't like "tarballs"...
Ubuntu is the "anti-command lines", "anti-tarballs"...

Those who like command lines and tarballs had their distro ready to use many years ago... before Ubuntu was available.

There were other distros that didn't require command line use or tarballs long before Ubuntu. How many other distros have you used?

Techsnap
December 1st, 2009, 10:49 PM
Most people don't like typing command lines. Most people don't like "tarballs"...
Ubuntu is the "anti-command lines", "anti-tarballs"...

You need to give Mandriva and OpenSUSE a try really.. they've been around long before Ubuntu and they have a nice central administration panel.

ghostborg
December 1st, 2009, 11:00 PM
Easiest to find help.

subdivision
December 1st, 2009, 11:08 PM
brown. gotta be the brown.

This.

tjwoosta
December 1st, 2009, 11:22 PM
Definitely the community.

murderslastcrow
December 1st, 2009, 11:25 PM
Momentum. Most people who port software to Linux only provide packages for the most popular distros, and in some cases only for Ubuntu. Which adds to its ease of use in a sort of round-about way, the same way how people use Windows because it's easier than installing Wine and modifying some settings for certain programs.

Dell sells it on their computers, too. It comes on most of the ZaReason and system76 computers, as well. And that adds more to its popularity.

But, all in all, you can have everything in an Ubuntu system without Ubuntu. There's nothing keeping you here, but it's just easier to get going.

Lithaerien
December 1st, 2009, 11:31 PM
Ubuntu is also sold on new Dell laptops and PCs.. I don't really see any major manufacturer that sells Linux OS pre-installed on a new PC.

adeypoop
December 1st, 2009, 11:37 PM
Really good branding is a factor (yes that includes the infamous brown) plus some good luck in the timing of when it came along. Ease of use is another big factor, majority of people want a linux distro that just works.

joey-elijah
December 1st, 2009, 11:39 PM
Initially it was popular because it made installation easy and you could get it on a cd for free!

Then came the community.

Then came the momentum/hype.

Then came software that packages only for Ubuntu (thus people find it easier to use ubuntu because their fave software is already packaged.)

Then came continued stability (say what you like about the recent regressions in performance but Hardy is rock solid, as was Ibex. Karmic has been immensely awesome for me, too.)

PArt of its popularity in many respects is the fact it is so popular. Now that sounds like it doesn't make sense, but it's a cyclic thing.

forrestcupp
December 1st, 2009, 11:47 PM
Yep. That's it. Even though there are other distros that do the same. Just as easily.

But Ubuntu was one of the first to do easy and do it good. Ubuntu was easy when everyone else wasn't. I tried Ubuntu out in its Hoary Hedgehog release. I had already tried out several other distros that were all a pain in the backside to install, and hardware support was shoddy ootb. The only other easy ones had commercial setbacks where you either had to pay for the whole OS or pay for certain features that were needed.

Ubuntu was totally free, very easy, and had relatively good hardware support before everyone else, and they built a name for themselves. Now that there are other quality distros that are just as easy to use, Ubuntu is still on top because of their name.

kevCast
December 1st, 2009, 11:51 PM
brown. gotta be the brown.
I laughed.

gn2
December 2nd, 2009, 12:15 AM
One word: Shipit (https://shipit.ubuntu.com/).

At the time when Ubuntu started to become popular, broadband was nowhere near as widespread as it is now.
CDs mailed free to anywhere in the world is the one thing Ubuntu did that no other distro could do and it enabled Ubuntu to reach a far wider audience.

PuddingKnife
December 2nd, 2009, 12:31 AM
Compiz. Those videos on Youtube were my saving grace when XP crapped out on me. Now I know more about OS's, open source, and computers in general. I credit all of this to the Compiz/Ubuntu videos that initially sparked my interest. I didnt even know what linux was at at that point.

Now I can kind of work my way around the command line and pimp out my Ubuntu till my hearts content. I may one day get around to trying other distros, but for now Im happy to have Ubuntu and be a part of this community.

PatrickMoore
December 2nd, 2009, 12:35 AM
its because Mr. Shuttleworth is so damned handsome...

seriously, i think its because the easier learning curve. camparing to fedora which i hated trying to get my wifi to work and sabayon which was one big mess

oldsoundguy
December 2nd, 2009, 12:51 AM
Ease of use .. yes. Easy to understand instructions .. yes.
There are things that need "fixing" that some other distros have fixed, BUT

Just venture to their forums ... and look carefully at the responses to a lot of the newbie questions, and you will realize that this PARTICULAR group of users in the main seem to feel that since they were newbies once, newbies are to be helped .. NOT MADE FUN OF or DERIDED. More of a sense of "community" than "superiority".

This goes true for the generalized LinuxQuestions forum .. "RTFM" and "that's a dumb question" type of responses or totally incomplete answers are even on that forum! (tell you what to do but not HOW TO DO IT ... and when you ask how, you get slammed!)

Warpnow
December 2nd, 2009, 12:58 AM
Ubuntu has very extensive repositories. I've asked alot of experienced linux users why they use ubuntu over others and they say this basically. Its alot easier and more hassle free to get most programs on ubuntu.

lethalfang
December 2nd, 2009, 01:18 AM
Zero prior experience in Linux required to install it and then perform common tasks, e.g., browsing the web, etc.

sisco311
December 2nd, 2009, 01:25 AM
$$$$ backing, and a great deal of word of mouth.

+1

I can't believe nobody mentioned Canonical, Mark Shuttleworth & the money...


One word: Shipit (https://shipit.ubuntu.com/).

At the time when Ubuntu started to become popular, broadband was nowhere near as widespread as it is now.
CDs mailed free to anywhere in the world is the one thing Ubuntu did that no other distro could do and it enabled Ubuntu to reach a far wider audience.



+1

good business strategy.




EDIT: and the main goal of the project is: Linux for masses (human beings).

Shpongle
December 2nd, 2009, 02:39 AM
Ubuntu has very extensive repositories. I've asked alot of experienced linux users why they use ubuntu over others and they say this basically. Its alot easier and more hassle free to get most programs on ubuntu.

++

yea most of us cant constantly be maintaining our systems due time busy lifestyles, like editing conf files etc, ubuntu is hassle free in that sense , you can still do it but its not required , thus i can get on with my college work / daily tasks etc but still have infinite choice and customizable options too. also linux is just the best! it offers sooooooo much !!!!

LepeKaname
December 2nd, 2009, 02:41 AM
This forum!!

I change from Slackware to Ubuntu just because every time I had a problem I found the solution here :D. The community support is great!!

:popcorn:

bodhi.zazen
December 2nd, 2009, 02:57 AM
brown. gotta be the brown.

LOL !!!!!


Ubuntu has very extensive repositories. I've asked alot of experienced linux users why they use ubuntu over others and they say this basically. Its alot easier and more hassle free to get most programs on ubuntu.

1. Ease of installation. When Ubuntu started, there was a sincere effort to make the installation as easy as possible. Back in those days it was not so easy to install Linux, some distros required one to compile a kernel, steep learning curve for new users.

Ubuntu - an ancient African word for can't install Debian.

At the time of Ubuntu 4.10, What other os was as easy to install ? Knoppix ? SUSE would get my vote, followed by Fedora core then Slackware and then Debian (sorry, Debian was not so easy to install).


http://people.canonical.com/%7Ekirkland/Museum/4.10_warty.tn.png (http://people.canonical.com/%7Ekirkland/Museum/4.10_warty.png)

2. Repositories. The sheer size of the Ubuntu repositories. Not that it is all *that* difficult to compile from source mind you, but it is easy to get spoiled by the Ubuntu repositories.

For example, slackware is a nice distro, as is Puppy, DSL, or Slitaz, but what to do if you need an application that is not in the small repos ;)

Now some distros, such a Gentoo or BSD indeed have nice large repos, but see #1 for installing issues.

3. Community. The Ubuntu community sets the tone to be as welcoming to new users as possible. Back when Ubuntu started, new users were often told in other communities to "RTFM" and new users were unwelcome. A few communities are still like this today, but most (not all) online forums have seen the success of the Ubuntu community and made an effort to be more welcoming to new users.

Most people come for the free OS, given out by ShipIT, the learn Linux, and many move to other OS, but most stay for the community.

Since this conversation is happening on the forms , "the community" is going to refer to the Ubuntu Forums for the majority of users reading this thread, but, for those who are active on IRC, LP, MOTU, etc, I would include those groups as well. It is rare to find an individual that is active in more then one of these areas.

Even the most recalcitrant "whiners" in the Resolution Center and grubbiest of trolls keeps coming back to the Ubuntu (forums) community. :lolflag:

ctdahle
December 2nd, 2009, 04:54 AM
As a new convert, I would echo much of what has been posted above. I first tried to learn linux in 1997, having bought a shrinkwrapped Red Hat 5 and every linux book in the O'Reilly catalog. I went as far as I could on my own and when I finally managed to load the kernal, startX and get netscape buggily running, I was pretty disappointed by the RTFM hostility. As a math teacher and lawyer, I found the insinuation that I hadn't read the manual pretty insulting, and in retrospect, I don't think my questions were all that stupid.

Ubuntu is successful because of Ubuntu, the spirit of humanity that flows from the user community.

I have tried several other distros since RH5, and while they have gotten steadily easier to set up, this go-round with Jaunty and Karmic have been extraordinarily pleasant.

PariahVayne
December 2nd, 2009, 04:57 AM
x

cartisdm
December 2nd, 2009, 05:20 AM
why is this?

Because it's awesome

JDShu
December 2nd, 2009, 06:35 AM
But Ubuntu was one of the first to do easy and do it good. Ubuntu was easy when everyone else wasn't. I tried Ubuntu out in its Hoary Hedgehog release. I had already tried out several other distros that were all a pain in the backside to install, and hardware support was shoddy ootb. The only other easy ones had commercial setbacks where you either had to pay for the whole OS or pay for certain features that were needed.

Ubuntu was totally free, very easy, and had relatively good hardware support before everyone else, and they built a name for themselves. Now that there are other quality distros that are just as easy to use, Ubuntu is still on top because of their name.

This is absolutely correct.

Ji Ruo
December 2nd, 2009, 06:53 AM
I think that the intention behind it was also very important - the idea of Linux for human beings - people who were not experts, and of a free OS for everyone. It's been backed up by the language support, accessibility features, the ShipIt program and a supportive community.

RichardLinx
December 2nd, 2009, 07:20 AM
When Ubuntu came out there weren't too many Linux based OS's that were easy to install and had good reputations when it came to hardware detection and reliability. Ubuntu came out with a lot of hype and financial backing and promised both those things. So partly it was timing.

Once it caught on and developed a moderate user base new users who stumbled across Linux were asking "What's a good Linux for a begginner?" and I saw many people (myself included) recommending Ubuntu as the top choice for someone brand new to the scene.

I think that cycle continues now, only there are more people asking and more people spreading the word and suggesting the same begginner distro. (Mint seems to be catching on nicely as well..)

PariahVayne
December 2nd, 2009, 07:22 AM
x

aysiu
December 2nd, 2009, 07:38 AM
Here's my theory:
How did Ubuntu end up so popular? (http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntucat/how-did-ubuntu-end-up-so-popular/)