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Kernel Sanders
February 19th, 2006, 11:56 PM
Hi Everyone!

The thing is, i'm a pretty advanced Windows user (XP Pro in particular), and i'm also a very happy user (a rare breed I know! LOL).

As I know what i'm doing, I have Windows running very quickly, its very stable, never crashes on me, and I have no trouble with spyware/adware/trojans/virus's etc....

However, I am also a very strong advocate for supporting the rights of the individual, and personal freedoms. I believe strongly that an individual has the basic inaliable right to do whatever the hell they want, provided their actions does not adversely affect any other individual or group.

I also believe strongly that when you as a consumer buy something, it becomes YOURS, and with that, comes the right to do whatever the hell you like with it, again provided that your actions with said product do not adversely affect any other individual or group.

The problem i'm having is that these beliefs are not compatible with modern computing.

Product Activation, Genuine Windows, Digital Rights Management, Intrusive Software Updates, Shocking EULA's etc...... are all eroding the rights of the consumer to a dangerous level. If I look for "official support" (Updates etc) I am often forced to submit my hard drive to intrusive checks, and am often left feeling that I am being treated like a criminal even though there is no evidence of wrong doing on my part. This is not just happening to me either, this is how ALL the "big corporation's" customers are being treated, and its getting worse...... (Rootkits anyone? Hardware based DRM?)

I really cant understand how its legal to be honest, surely there are some consumer rights laws to prevent this? Apparently not though...... Oh and while I remember, apparently the software that I spent many hundreds of /$ on is not actually mine, i'm simply "leasing" it, and it remains the property of [insert a big corporation's name here] at all times...... oh and they have the right to disable it at will, install software without the users consent too.....

These "devices" are said to be necessary to stop piracy, but as pirates will just develop a few .exe files that will bypass their problem, (Sometimes even before the software is officially released) the only person that is adversely affected is the consumer, the person that actually paid good money for a product that is now not "technically" theirs to do what they like with.

I love Windows XP Pro, but I "tollerate" activation (I have to after all), but I point blank, refuse to take part in "Genuine Windows", "Windows Update" (I just download and install service packs), and DRM.

Therefore Windows XP Pro and Microsoft Office 2003 Professional will be the LAST piece of propriatary software that I will EVER buy. (Has anyone seen what Windows Vista will be like? Talk about a bloated, resource hogging, freedom/privacy destroying piece of ****!........ my god!)

So for me..... the sand timer has turned! As I really like Windows XP Pro, and am currently able to "tollerate" activation, I am more than happy to stick with Windows XP Pro until it becomes "out of date" and virtually unusable for what will "then be" modern computing.

So i'm guessing that I have a 3 year countdown?

In three years, my hard drive will be wiped, and a fresh copy of Ubuntu will be installed, along with Firefox (I'm using that already..... IE? LMFAO! LOL) Open Office, and any other Open Source applications that I need.

Other Distro's? Not even considered or even will consider it!

I have done some research into the concept of Ubuntu itself, as I was curious as to where the name came from, and lets just say, anything connected, or tries to aspire to a concept/ideology/way of life such as this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ubuntu_%28ideology%29

Has my full, and unequivical support! What an excellent concept/ideology/way of life! With the world as chaotic as it is, to see an ideology such as this, breaking through, and being adopted by so many people...... its heart warming, and to some extent, restores my faith in humanity.

Mark Shuttleworth, and the rest of the Ubuntu team, have my full support and admiration. They are excellent ambassadors for the whole Open Source Movement in general, and for the principals and ideals for which it, and the ideology of what the whole Ubuntu concept stands for. Well Done! And Keep Up The Good Work =D>

So, over the course of the next 3 years or so, I will buy a few books on Ubuntu, and Linux in general actually, so that I can not only learn more about Ubuntu, but also the whole open source movement in general. I will keep regular checks on these forums and probably post regualrly for help on what i've read, and to give you updates on how i'm getting on, and to even give help to others if I ever get to that stage! LOL :D

So, if all goes to plan, when i'm finally ready to "bin" Windows XP Pro for good in 3 years or so, i'll have all the knowledge and understanding i'll need to jump straight into Ubuntu without any problems, my transition being (hopefully) eased by lots of research, and you guys/girls!

So..... I guess what i'm asking is........ is this ok? Or are these forums here for people who are actually using Ubuntu "now"?

Either way, many thanks for all the help and support i've recieved so far, this really is a great community! A superb ambassador in itself for the whole Open Source Movement, and for the principals and ideals for which it, and the ideology of which the whole Ubuntu concept stands! (Yes I know I used the same line to describe Mark Shuttleworth and the whole Ubuntu team, but I also believe the statement holds equally as much truth when used to describe the whole Ubuntu Community! I hope the fact that i've used that statement twice doesnt "dilute" its meaning, and the sincerity upon which it was delivered.)

Thanks Again for all your help! And to everyone..... KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK! =D>

All the best!

John \\:D/

**P.S** Apologies for the length of my post!

Master Shake
February 20th, 2006, 12:01 AM
I'd say if you want more info on Ubuntu, then by all means, ask away... I don't think anybody else would have problems with that.

xequence
February 20th, 2006, 12:03 AM
As I know what i'm doing, I have Windows running very quickly, its very stable, never crashes on me, and I have no trouble with spyware/adware/trojans/virus's etc....

Exactly the same for me.


So..... I guess what i'm asking is........ is this ok? Or are these forums here for people who are actually using Ubuntu "now"?

I dont use ubuntu (right now) and noone cares that I am here :P

So, your welcome to stay here, and if anyone doesent like that you dont use ubuntu at the moment, tell them I told them they are stupid o_O

mstlyevil
February 20th, 2006, 12:09 AM
Excellent post. By all means you are welcome to these forums no matter what OS you are currently using. (I have my Wintendo XP partition.) There are a few Win XP users that are members of this forum so you do not have to feel unwelcome. I do have one suggestion. Try dual booting XP and Ubuntu. The best way to learn about Linux is to just jump on in and start using it. It is different than Windows but it really is no harder to use once you get past the learning curve. Whatever you decide to do good luck in your endeavors.

benplaut
February 20th, 2006, 12:10 AM
Welcome to the community!

You're exactly the kind of user that's hard to get into linux - they have no problems with running windows, just their conscience tells them they shouldn't.

I was in that category, and it took me a while to get into the new things. Stick with it, and you'll love the change.

Good luck!

Jedeye
February 20th, 2006, 12:11 AM
So for me..... the sand timer has turned! As I really like Windows XP Pro, and am currently able to "tollerate" activation, I am more than happy to stick with Windows XP Pro until it becomes "out of date" and virtually unusable for what will "then be" modern computing.

So i'm guessing that I have a 3 year countdown?

In three years, my hard drive will be wiped, and a fresh copy of Ubuntu will be installed, along with Firefox (I'm using that already..... IE? LMFAO! LOL) Open Office, and any other Open Source applications that I need.
I know you are saying that once windows becomes out of date you are switching over to linux but I would suggest duel booting(as long as you have a little free space) that way as you read up and learn more about linux you will have it right there to try out. So when the sand runs out it will be a very easy transition(if you even decide to wait the entire time)

I'm not saying that you should go install right now... but at least give it some thought

Jedeye
February 20th, 2006, 12:13 AM
I think mstlyevil has beaten me to posting about the same thing at least 3 times in the past 24 hours :evil: lol

bored2k
February 20th, 2006, 12:14 AM
So..... I guess what i'm asking is........ is this ok? Or are these forums here for people who are actually using Ubuntu "now"?Like xequence said, it's not a problem what distribution you are or you are not using. I'm not even using UBuntu at the moment, and I don't see anyone kicking me ;).

kassetra
February 20th, 2006, 12:17 AM
I'd also suggest trying the live cd as you learn. :)

IYY
February 20th, 2006, 12:17 AM
My suggestion is to install Linux. Maybe not on your main computer, though. It's not too difficult to find an old PC and experiment on it. For example, I bought my Pentium II computer for $5 on a garage sale. It runs Ubuntu very well.

mstlyevil
February 20th, 2006, 12:18 AM
I think mstlyevil has beaten me to posting about the same thing at least 3 times in the past 24 hours :evil: lol

You keep reading my damned mind. Just don't go telling all my secrets. :twisted:

Arc Owner
February 20th, 2006, 12:25 AM
Welcome to the community dude!:D :p

Don't worry about what distrobution you are using, just like everyone else said. I am currently installing gentoo (although I really like ubuntu also) myself. Dual-booting with XP might be a good option to start getting more familiar with linux, but I don't think you'd have to go out and buy books to learn about linux. If you want to though, by all means do, but by just trying out and experimenting with linux, and reading linux forums, you can learn a lot also.

Arc Owner

imagine
February 20th, 2006, 12:32 AM
I love Windows XP Pro, but I "tollerate" activation (I have to after all), but I point blank, refuse to take part in "Genuine Windows", "Windows Update" (I just download and install service packs), and DRM.

[...]

So..... I guess what i'm asking is........ is this ok? Or are these forums here for people who are actually using Ubuntu "now"?
That's basically the same boat I was or am sitting in, just that for me this "product activation" is beyond the red line. I'm not going to call anyone to ask permission for installing software (which I paid for) on my own computer. Windows XP/2003/Vista did not and will not find their way on any of my harddisks.

So welcome aboard : )


So, over the course of the next 3 years or so, I will buy a few books on Ubuntu, and Linux in general actually, so that I can not only learn more about Ubuntu, but also the whole open source movement in general. I will keep regular checks on these forums and probably post regualrly for help on what i've read, and to give you updates on how i'm getting on, and to even give help to others if I ever get to that stage!
I prefer doing over reading. When you actually try something out you learn much more than by simply reading about it.
I suggest using VMware instead of dual booting, maybe first with Windows as host and Ubuntu as guest. That way you can continue using Windows as you are used to and meanwhile mess around with Ubuntu in a window *at the same time*. That way backing up and restoring Ubuntu is easy too (snapshots, independant disks, etc).

Bragador
February 20th, 2006, 12:36 AM
Let's jsut say that windows vista is coming out and if you want to be up to date you have to pay. In linux world you can have an up to date desktop all the time for 0$

This is actually why I'm preparing myself to switch to linux for when dapper drakes come out (and my univesity session ends).

At least you are open minded though. Even if you end up not installing linux, you are considering the possibility and you are learning about it.

Kuddos to you !

:mrgreen:

briancurtin
February 20th, 2006, 12:37 AM
Other Distro's? Not even considered or even will consider it!
im not sure if this is the best way to jump into linux/open source. we definitely welcome you here, but take this into consideration: ubuntu is a very good distro, but sometimes it isnt the best tool for the job, so dont lock yourself in now. im not knocking ubuntu in any way, but you never know what you will find. there are hundreds of distributions out there and many of them are very different, and some offer different things to different types of people. you seem to like the ubuntu philsophy, which is good, but many of us have found after some use that it doesnt play that big of a part. you may stick with the philosophy, but don't narrow yourself down before you even try it. if you run into problems, you wont have anywhere to turn if you have yourself narrowed down this much. try to be more open with it and see what you can find out about linux as a whole, and some other distributions. some are faster, some are more open, some are more geared towards some users, and at the same time some of them suck. just try not to lock yourself down too early.

Krigl
February 20th, 2006, 12:49 AM
Heh, I've been usin XP Pro the same way - no STD's or poisonings of system, only a few crashes (and nothing serious) but I always wanted to try some Linux, because of both curiosity and your reasons. I had the idea of trying things and learning in Linux, while using Win for the "real stuff" before I learn how to do it under Linux. Well, I installed and didn't need to use Windows ever again. Therefore I second all those dual-boot advisors before - even if you'll use it as toy and last save, you'll at least get some practice.
Btw. I'm gonna format my disk soon and erase Windows, although it's legal copy (which is pretty unusual here).

Arktis
February 20th, 2006, 01:51 AM
I am glad to see this kind of genuinely concerned and clearly declarative post, *john*. I'm tired of talking to people about freedoms until I'm blue in the face and reading your post was a nice thing for me.

There are plenty of regular posters here that don't currently have ubuntu installed. Every once in a while you'll find that somebody admits to it - nobody really seems to mind or raise any protests. I think the general feeling on the forums here (apart from the casual users) is that the important thing is Free Open Source Software itself. I believe this is also in the spirit of ubuntu itself; that as a byproduct of development it contributes something valuable back into FOSS.

prizrak
February 20th, 2006, 02:07 AM
Hey man,
Welcome to the forum is cool that you not using Ubuntu yet. Although in 3 years time you won't need any knowledge to have it up and running ;)

Kernel Sanders
February 20th, 2006, 02:41 AM
Hi Everyone!

Thankyou so much for your kind comments! They have been very much appreciated! :oops:

You know, i've taken your "learn by doing" and "dual-boot" advice on board, and Dell are running a HUGE sale in the UK at the moment. I was thinking about buying a really really cheap laptop off them, and loading Ubuntu on it? That way, I can keep my Windows XP Pro machine just the way I like it, but have another far more crappy machine to learn Ubuntu on?

What do you think? I would prefer it because I can then run Ubuntu and Windows XP Pro at exactly the same time if I need to, as opposed to writing down your comments and trying them out or anything like that?

How would Ubuntu be on this system:

14.1" WXGA 1280x800 Screen
Intel Celeron M 1.5 Ghz
256 MB Ram
40 GB Hard Drive
Integrated AGP Graphics
DVD-RW +/-
Internal Dell Wireless

Would it be fast? Slow? Or just run "ok"?

Anyway, I am a firm believer that its actually the users that make a forum what it is, and after what i've seen here? This is a *SUPERB* forum!

Thanks again for all your help guys! Youve been fantastic! =D>

poofyhairguy
February 20th, 2006, 02:46 AM
Forum is for all Ubuntu users, not or in the future.

If you want to switch in the next three years, don't buy a sinlge piece of hardware that you have not found on our wiki to be compatible. And even then, if you can avoid the ATI cards, broadcom wireless cards, and some brands of printers.

mstlyevil
February 20th, 2006, 02:46 AM
Hi Everyone!

Thankyou so much for your kind comments! They have been very much appreciated! :oops:

You know, i've taken your "learn by doing" and "dual-boot" advice on board, and Dell are running a HUGE sale in the UK at the moment. I was thinking about buying a really really cheap laptop off them, and loading Ubuntu on it? That way, I can keep my Windows XP Pro machine just the way I like it, but have another far more crappy machine to learn Ubuntu on?

What do you think? I would prefer it because I can then run Ubuntu and Windows XP Pro at exactly the same time if I need to, as opposed to writing down your comments and trying them out or anything like that?

How would Ubuntu be on this system:

14.1" WXGA 1280x800 Screen
Intel Celeron M 1.5 Ghz
256 MB Ram
40 GB Hard Drive
Integrated AGP Graphics
DVD-RW +/-
Internal Dell Wireless

Would it be fast? Slow? Or just run "ok"?

Anyway, I am a firm believer that its actually the users that make a forum what it is, and after what i've seen here? This is a *SUPERB* forum!

Thanks again for all your help guys! Youve been fantastic! =D>

The only thing I would change on that lappy is adding at least another 256 megs of RAM. Ubuntu will work ok on 256 but it will access the swap file a lot more and slow down your computing. 512 will give you plenty of room to ensure you rarely have to access the swap file and make computing on Ubuntu/or any OS, much more pleasurable.

Kvark
February 20th, 2006, 02:50 AM
That laptop should run Ubuntu perfectly as long as there are good Linux drivers for the various parts. Heavy tasks like editing big images in the Gimp will require more ram to be fast but most tasks run fine for me on 256MB. You might want to check in the wiki how good Linux support that hardware has:
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/HardwareSupport

The hardest part for you will be that you are so used to and skilled at Windows that you subconciously take it for granted that things should work like they do on Windows. To do things in a different way will probably feel illogical, wrong and complicated at first.

Arc Owner
February 20th, 2006, 03:16 AM
It should run great on that machine, although I don't have any experience with ubuntu on laptops, only on workstations.

One thing you need to know and remember about linux is that it will work on virtually any type of hardware, even on the oldest of systems. There are some distro's like Suse that will require newer hardware, but most will work on any. That is one of the great things you will find and love to know about linux. While MS makes you upgrade your hardware every time they come out with a new version of their OS, linux doesn't require any hardware upgrading at all (although your system will perform faster with better hardware).

Kvark is right that you might have trouble with getting used to things not "just working". Some things in ubuntu or any distro might require some configuring, that is not to say that everything does, but don't be pissed if something doesn't work the first time. This isn't really ubuntu's fault or linux's fault at all, it's the hardware vendor who doesn't provide linux support for their product. Just make sure you are careful with each piece of hardware you buy to make sure it is linux compatible.

Arc Owner

fuscia
February 20th, 2006, 06:05 AM
i ran ME into the ground before i started thinking of switching to linux. even then, i had a concern about wireless and pestered some people here about it. they were always patient and generous with info. while many here are anti microsoft because of the nature of their operating systems, others of us have had good experiences with their software. you've done a great job at making a distinction between the software and the policies associated with it. stay. you might end up deciding you're ready sooner than you thought.

Kernel Sanders
February 20th, 2006, 12:49 PM
Thanks again everyone!

You've been a great help to me!

Getting a cheap laptop and learning all about Ubuntu on it is definately something to think about....... *wonders*

With this level of help, screw Linux (all the distro's in general), Ubuntu will be the one getting a 10% market share soon enough!

I really cant thank you all enough!

All the very best!

John

xequence
February 20th, 2006, 01:19 PM
With this level of help, screw Linux (all the distro's in general), Ubuntu will be the one getting a 10% market share soon enough!

Not until it gets preinstalled on computers by the big companies like HP or Dell though :P

Kernel Sanders
February 20th, 2006, 03:04 PM
Not until it gets preinstalled on computers by the big companies like HP or Dell though :P

Dont worry, ordinary people will be able to build their own computers soon enough, and then they'll install Ubuntu rather than Windows! \\:D/

[/idealist]

BoyOfDestiny
February 20th, 2006, 03:14 PM
Dont worry, ordinary people will be able to build their own computers soon enough, and then they'll install Ubuntu rather than Windows! \\:D/

[/idealist]

Agreed. Anyway I made the jump from a similar background... Although I had already been using open office etc... Majority of my win32 apps were gpl'ed (the os was the next step)... So seeing where things were going, I'm glad ubuntu came along (right before I was playing with the unnofficial amd64 debian back in 2004 ;) ).

Anyway, best of luck to you, and I do recommend another machine vs dual-booting (I'd get stuck doing something in windows and not reboot...).

The whole sony drm thing, even though I haven't bought a cd in a decade was enough to signal me to buy a nice big hard drive, copy my data, and say bye to windows.

As for "ordinary" people using linux, just try this, have them sit down at your computer... Use firefox, open office (or abiword), etc. They can certainly do these tasks with almost no learning curve. Show them synaptic or better yet the simple add application menu, and wow them a bit :) Don't forget to mention you don't have to defrag anymore. :)
I'm convinced that most people can use linux once it's setup on their box (much as windows is for most), I've noticed fear of it has lately been turned to interest. Many people I've talked to would like to try linux or have a linux box, somehow I think Vista is to thank.

Kernel Sanders
February 20th, 2006, 03:43 PM
Agreed. Anyway I made the jump from a similar background... Although I had already been using open office etc... Majority of my win32 apps were gpl'ed (the os was the next step)... So seeing where things were going, I'm glad ubuntu came along (right before I was playing with the unnofficial amd64 debian back in 2004 ;) ).

Anyway, best of luck to you, and I do recommend another machine vs dual-booting (I'd get stuck doing something in windows and not reboot...).

The whole sony drm thing, even though I haven't bought a cd in a decade was enough to signal me to buy a nice big hard drive, copy my data, and say bye to windows.

As for "ordinary" people using linux, just try this, have them sit down at your computer... Use firefox, open office (or abiword), etc. They can certainly do these tasks with almost no learning curve. Show them synaptic or better yet the simple add application menu, and wow them a bit :) Don't forget to mention you don't have to defrag anymore. :)
I'm convinced that most people can use linux once it's setup on their box (much as windows is for most), I've noticed fear of it has lately been turned to interest. Many people I've talked to would like to try linux or have a linux box, somehow I think Vista is to thank.


I wholeheartidly agree! We definately have Microsoft's abomination that is "Windows Vista", to thank for recent interest in Linux, and GPL in general actually!

Cheers to Bill Gates and Steve "I'm Going To F**king Kill Google" Balmer I say! \\:D/

LOL! :mrgreen:

hizaguchi
February 20th, 2006, 03:44 PM
How would Ubuntu be on this system:

14.1" WXGA 1280x800 Screen
Intel Celeron M 1.5 Ghz
256 MB Ram
40 GB Hard Drive
Integrated AGP Graphics
DVD-RW +/-
Internal Dell Wireless

Would it be fast? Slow? Or just run "ok"?


That's almost exactly my laptop... except mine is down to 128 megs of RAM because one of the slots stopped working. It'll run pretty decent on that, but like has been said, more memory would really help if you're going to use Gnome.

Also, if you've done any tweaking at all to Windows (like disabling a bunch of services, making a dedicated swap partition, etc.) you'll probably be disappointed at the speed of the basic Ubuntu installation. The boot time is pretty massive in comparision too. And since you're installing on a laptop, be warned that sleep (such as when you close the lid) may or may not work.

If you can deal with all of that, go for it. Based on what you've said, I'm probably far less computer literate than you, and one day I just installed Ubuntu on my old desktop and started using it. I have no idea what I'm doing when it comes to compiling software (I compiled e17 completely by cutting and pasting in the terminal), but that doesn't stop me from doing everything I could do in Windows now in Linux. Seriously, as long as you don't have some kind of funky hardware, if you can point and click, and occasionally cut and paste, you can switch to Linux. Just like Windows, basic daily work really doesn't require you to know anything about the operating system. Just install it on something and start messing around, and you'll pick up everything you need to know over time.

Stormy Eyes
February 20th, 2006, 03:48 PM
As I know what i'm doing, I have Windows running very quickly, its very stable, never crashes on me, and I have no trouble with spyware/adware/trojans/virus's etc....

However, I am also a very strong advocate for supporting the rights of the individual, and personal freedoms.

Hey, that's a nobler reason than I had for ditching Windows back in 1999. I'm just a cheapskate and a control freak. :)

Kernel Sanders
February 20th, 2006, 06:58 PM
^^^^^^

LOL! :mrgreen:

Thats pretty much why i'm looking to switch, I find windows excellent, but I cant in good conscience continue using it with Microsoft's massively unethical behaviour.

I also find DRM, Activation, Genuine Windows, Intrusive Windows Updates, quite frankly sickening. As a strong advocate for freedom and privacy I just find myself shaking my head in disgust.

Lastly, the whole ideology of Ubuntu excellent, an a fantasic concept to spread around the world. If more people lived by that concept, the world would be a better place!

steve.horsley
February 20th, 2006, 09:41 PM
I found that wireless worked no probs on my Dell latitude D600. It had a centrino sticker on it I think, so I guess that's an intel wifi part. I read somewhere that intel is one of the few that Linux can drive at the moment.

Be warned that Linux is rather different to windows. I suspect that the more of a windows expert you are, the more like a fish out of water you will feel to start with. If you dual boot or run 2 machines for a while, you will of course first find things that you dislike in Linux compared to windows. After a while, you will come to appreciate that some things are done better in Linux, and I hope you will eventually prefer Linux because it's nicer to use, not just because it fits your moral outlook better than the spawn of the Dark Side does.

Start tinkering now rather than waiting 3 years. Then you can take that steep learning curve at a slow relaxed pace.

Lord Illidan
February 20th, 2006, 09:49 PM
Why not dual boot as well on your XP machine?

And though I believe that Ubuntu is the best distro out there, I still often recommend other distros like Damn Small Linux to people who need them.

I like your post though. You are willing to learn, which is excellent!

carlosqueso
February 20th, 2006, 10:07 PM
I have a pretty similar computer (well...had it till I dropped it one to many times :-/) and one much worse than that. It'll work, although I'd reccommend using xubuntu because GNOME likes it's memory a bit too much for my tastes. Of course, the nice thing about free software is you can install everything and sort out what works best later.

GreyFox503
February 20th, 2006, 11:26 PM
Glad to see you have such a strong interest in Free software. If you have not also seen the GNU's website (http://www.gnu.org/), you should check it out. They shares many of the values you've written about in your post.

I'm curious about the 3 year deadline. Is that an arbitrary goal you set? Or is something else happening at that time? Why not sooner?


About the computer:

I would also recommended 512MB RAM if you can spare it.

If you care about 3D acceleration (for cool screensavers, 3D games, etc) then I would recommend getting an Nvidia graphics chipset.

Maybe someone else can help me with this, but wireless ethernet in linux seems to be a bit lacking at the moment. You might want to check to see if the wireless chipset in the new laptop is supported (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/WifiDocs), otherwise you might be connecting ethernet cables a lot.
(https://wiki.ubuntu.com/WifiDocs)

xequence
February 20th, 2006, 11:30 PM
I also find DRM, Activation, Genuine Windows, Intrusive Windows Updates, quite frankly sickening. As a strong advocate for freedom and privacy I just find myself shaking my head in disgust.

Yea. Its all crap that hurts the people that it isnt intended to hurt :(

horsey1901
April 14th, 2006, 05:22 AM
Like everyone else has been saying you should try a dual boot system, I did and though I am more than profficient with windows XP NT server etc it took me a little while to learn linux so I felt comfortable.

I am a person who also does not like the tying up of consumers and I have been in the past couple of weeks talking to my clients about shifting off windows and onto a linux distro. Ubuntu of course. They have already been using Firefox and Thunderbird so it should be an easy sell.

To anyone else who has been using windows and wanting to change, go for it what do you have to loose. Licencing issues, registration,invasion of privacy constant daily security alerts. I know I am not missing them

The Horse

zubrug
April 15th, 2006, 12:51 AM
live cd's are great, go nuts, there are alot of good distro's and forums. You are correct about this community, it will teach you or guide to to sources that will get everything you need.

almahtar
April 15th, 2006, 06:03 AM
Aye. The community is amazing. I'm a dirt-poor student and found myself sorely needing a computer since I am, after all, a computer science senior. In my desperation I bought a computer that has terrible linux compatability. The forum users were always very helpful, patient, and responsive and helped guide me through my problems every time.

Regarding wireless: there's a utility called "ndiswrapper" that pretty much pretends to be Windows and just uses your Windows wireless drivers. It works great for my broadcom card. You should have little trouble without it if your wireless is an Intel chipset (Intel wireless cards are notorious for good Linux compatability, as are their graphics cards), but if you do encounter problems you can just use ndiswrapper to get your windows drivers working in Linux.

I'm with you about the ethics of large companies and rights management. I think it'll get much worse if people don't start motivating these companies to change by refusing them business. You've taken a step in the right direction. I switched to Linux for the same reasons as you, but its usability is what really sold me in the end. I don't like using Windows now because everything takes longer to do...

Anyway play around with a "live cd" some. Not sure if you know what that is, but it's a risk-free way to test Linux on your machine. It doesn't touch your hard drive. It runs slower consequently, but it's very safe and makes no changes to your machine.