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mo.reina
November 18th, 2009, 03:14 AM
i've posted this in the unix forums, i was wondering what recommendations the ubuntu community would have, being focused on linux rather than general *nix systems.

i have a little background in C (2 sems in university), and have been studying the bash articles on tldp.org i just wanted to know what you guys recommend i look up next. i'm interested in the server administration side of linux, and in kernel and peripheral interface. so i'm not sure whether to take up mysql, php, go back to C, etc.

alphaniner
November 18th, 2009, 05:55 AM
There was recently a post by a guy who claimed to have a lot of Linux and/or Unix credentials but was having trouble getting a job. He said employers were more interested in real world experience. So I recommend looking for ways to get some of that. :)

Edit: maybe I overstated his claims, here's the thread (http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1323822).

scorp123
November 18th, 2009, 06:12 AM
so i'm not sure whether to take up mysql, php, go back to C, etc. MySQL and PHP might be interesting if you are into web development. If you look for such a job (why not? it could open the door to other things ...) maybe your potential employer would like to see examples of your work .... So why not learn MySQL and PHP and create a really super-duper cute but fast web site somewhere so you could redirect your potential employer to that web page ... so they can see the quality of your work "in action".

One of my former apprentices did it like that. Being fresh out of school he had a real problem finding a job. So what he did is to create a super cool web site about a fictional (!) company. He did everything. Logos, designs, ... everything. The entire thing looked like a professionally designed real corporate web portal.

Good trick and it worked.

mo.reina
November 18th, 2009, 08:47 AM
well it's not really for finding a job... if i ever decide to code professionally i'll probably be working for myself. yoga classes pay the bills, and i spend at least 3 months of the year in india, which is a big no-no if you're a regular employee in a company. i'm doing this more out of curiosity and fun. i did take up computer science in college but i dropped out after my 2nd year.

ok so php and mysql for database and web programming (i guess this includes linux server administration?)but how about interfacing peripherals with the kernel, kernel programming, etc? i remember in school we learned so much about C but i couldn't for the life of me figure out how it was applied (great thing about the manual at tldp.org are the exercises at the end of each chapter, and people on the forums post scripting problems all the time).

mo.reina
November 19th, 2009, 02:22 AM
*bump

Frak
November 19th, 2009, 04:31 AM
MySQL and PHP might be interesting if you are into web development. If you look for such a job (why not? it could open the door to other things ...) maybe your potential employer would like to see examples of your work .... So why not learn MySQL and PHP and create a really super-duper cute but fast web site somewhere so you could redirect your potential employer to that web page ... so they can see the quality of your work "in action".

One of my former apprentices did it like that. Being fresh out of school he had a real problem finding a job. So what he did is to create a super cool web site about a fictional (!) company. He did everything. Logos, designs, ... everything. The entire thing looked like a professionally designed real corporate web portal.

Good trick and it worked.
Absolutely. People who have good design/coding skills will beat a newly graduated college student with no portfolio whatsoever.

Also, get in touch with some of the corporate favorites: JSP (or Groovy), ColdFusion, and ASP.NET. Knowing those can land you a better job.

mo.reina
November 20th, 2009, 01:53 AM
*bump