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View Full Version : [ubuntu] YA Newbie LTSP Thread: Hang on boot



Elkaintmoose
November 15th, 2009, 07:01 PM
I feel bad asking for help with this when there are so many other threads and how-to's out there, but I just can't seem to find one that solves my problem, and I feel like I may be close...

Here's some context: I'm trying to learn about LTSP for a class I'm taking, with the hopes of possibly setting up a classroom lab with some old iMacs. That, I understand, is a whole 'nother kettle of fish, and doesn't enter into this exercise. All I'm trying to do is get a simple server+client set up and running, so I can start to understand how the darned thing is supposed to work.

I'm probably muddying the water by setting up a server with two NIC's downstream from another perfectly good router (this is all on a home network, for now), and by using VirtualBox for quickie testing on a laptop.

Here's my problem, and I'll work backwards from there. I've got everything set up as best as I can determine, and when I boot from the client "machine," the output looks like this:

http://ferrellweb.com/temp/ltsp2.gif

As you can see, it's hanging at the end of the cascade of pxelinux.cfg/'s — so that's where I am.

Right off the bat, I suppose there are concerns about the nature of the virtual machine I'm using for a client—that's my biggest x-factor. Is this kosher? All I've got is a blank 50MB disk image set to boot from a gpxe.iso file. Could that be giving the config file fits? I'm not sure of another way to test an LTSP boot without another physical empty machine...

--------------------------------------

At the risk of being spammy, here's some other information about my setup:

I'm running Ubuntu 9.10 on the server.
The router on my LAN is at 192.168.1.1
I've *intended* to set the second NIC in my server to make a sub-network at 192.168.5.x

I've disabled the NetworkManager; here's the contents of my /etc/network/interfaces that I wrote by hand:


auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

#Main LAN network interface
auto eth0
iface eth0 inet static
address 192.168.1.105
netmask 255.255.255.0
network 192.168.1.0
broadcast 192.168.1.255
gateway 192.168.1.1
dns-nameservers 192.168.1.1

#LTSP network interface
auto eth1
iface eth1 inet static
address 192.168.5.1
netmask 255.255.255.0
network 192.168.5.0
broadcast 192.168.5.255
#dns-nameservers 192.168.1.1
up iptables-restore < /etc/ltsp/natFor the record, here's the contents of /etc/ltsp/nat:


# Generated by iptables-save v1.4.4 on Sun Nov 15 09:48:22 2009
*nat
:PREROUTING ACCEPT [0:0]
:POSTROUTING ACCEPT [6:590]
:OUTPUT ACCEPT [7:767]
-A POSTROUTING -s 192.168.5.0/24 -j MASQUERADE
COMMIT
# Completed on Sun Nov 15 09:48:22 2009
# Generated by iptables-save v1.4.4 on Sun Nov 15 09:48:22 2009
*filter
:INPUT ACCEPT [329775:279041075]
:FORWARD ACCEPT [6:364]
:OUTPUT ACCEPT [224493:39581639]
COMMIT
# Completed on Sun Nov 15 09:48:22 2009Here's my /etc/ltsp/dhcpd.conf file:


#
# Default LTSP dhcpd.conf config file.
#

authoritative;

subnet 192.168.5.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
range 192.168.5.20 192.168.5.30;
option domain-name "Isis.local";
option domain-name-servers 192.168.1.1;
option broadcast-address 192.168.5.255;
option routers 192.168.5.1;
# next-server 192.168.5.1;
# get-lease-hostnames true;
option subnet-mask 255.255.255.0;
option root-path "/opt/ltsp/i386";
if substring( option vendor-class-identifier, 0, 9 ) = "PXEClient" {
filename "ltsp/i386/pxelinux.0";
} else {
filename "ltsp/i386/nbi.img";
}
}I *believe* the networking stuff is working correctly. Here's a shot from an Ubuntu 9.04 *virtual* machine, running on the same VirtualBox install as my virtual LTSP client (on a laptop connected to the LTSP server's eth1 port):

http://ferrellweb.com/temp/ltsp4.gif

It looks like it's successfully finding the router to the outside world, even though it's IP address is within the range I want for my LTSP network — so all green, yes?

I can also confirm that the ltsp stuff exists on the server where I *think* it's trying to look for it:

http://ferrellweb.com/temp/ltsp-lib.jpg

Maybe that's enough clues for someone to give me a kick in the right direction? If not, I will gladly supply more, if anyone's kind enough to try to take this on.

Go easy on me—I think I'm starting to understand the concepts involved, but it feels like a house of cards in my brain—one wrong move, and the whole thing will come crashing down!

Thanks!
jeff@confused