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Arup
November 14th, 2009, 02:18 AM
http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-31012_7-10384068-10355804.html

Now, after having used Windows 7 exclusively for about four months on my PCs and even on my Mac, I realized that the impression Windows 95 made on me was far stronger than that of Windows 7 (or any other Windows).

Don't get me wrong. This is not a Windows 7-bashing article. Windows 7 is undoubtedly the most advanced and probably the best Windows ever. However, after 14 years, I think it's time Windows offered something more original than just improving and thriving on the success of Windows 95.

pwnst*r
November 14th, 2009, 02:19 AM
alright.

Zoot7
November 14th, 2009, 02:27 AM
That is a nice Article. I've gotta agree with most of it, especially the nonsensical amount of versions.

wilee-nilee
November 14th, 2009, 02:41 AM
The activation issue is a good one. I did a student upgrade and had to in the end wipe my computer in order to get rid of 25 gigs of unusable XP because it is a upgrade. So I had to call the W7 tech team to activate, and will have to do this on any fresh install of this 1 user 1 install. I talked with the manager about this. I basically said the average user who doesn't know how to wipe a computer and partition or dual boot would have probably gotten very angry at the situation and would just crack the key which is quite easy, or go to Apple or Open Source. This upgrade key problem with a wiped computer should be in the information on upgrading notes provided by the vendor Digital River which is actually a separate MS entity.

I even cracked the key myself but in MS eyes it wasn't a legal copy even though I bought the upgrade; and the key came with it. So I reinstalled and let them crack it.

Gosh I love open source!!!

Shibblet
November 14th, 2009, 02:51 AM
The activation thing was a DOOZY for Vista. People would buy Vista, realize their computer needed some beefing up, install the new hardware, and then have to play phone tag to activate the OS again.

I wonder what would happen if Microsoft released an open source version of Windows, like OpenXP...

The Funkbomb
November 14th, 2009, 02:59 AM
There is a very good reason why Win 7 is based on the Win 95 design. It's successful. Consumers are going to buy what they know. If they have to relearn the OS just to get going, they're not going to buy it. Imagine 50 and 60 year old office workers, not really proficient with computers already, getting Win7 on their office machine. Their managers saying, "Hey, you know how we sent you to day schools to learn these skills? Forget them, we're moving to something else. Report to the new classes tomorrow." Meanwhile, productivity plummets because people are trying to learn how to use the new software instead of working.

Of course you were stunned by the switch from DOS to Windows 95. (How come this guy never saw Windows 3.1?) You're going from text based to full on GUI. They're a world apart. The jump from Vista to 7 isn't nearly as big.

As far as compatibility, the author has a point. Perhaps going that far back to 95 isn't such a good idea. People do want that option. I know a person who runs a Win98 program in a VM because it hasn't been updated and she needs it. Certainly 7 should go at least back to XP with the option to turn on going back further for those who do need it.

I whole-heartedly agree about too many versions. They really went crazy with Vista. 7 is a little tamer with 3 versions for 32bit and 3 for 64bit. As far as I know, the only real difference between Ultimate and the one right below it is the language pack.

For the driver control, I disagree. Some people don't want stock drivers. Companies are releasing Open Source drivers. Some are better than stock, some are worse. It's up to the user to be careful.

The Ribbon toolbar/menu whatever. I don't really care for it but it doesn't bother me. Here is a bit of hypocrisy on the author's part. At the beginning, he's complaining there aren't enough changes. Now, he's complaining that they changed to the ribbon. Which is it dude?

The deactivation stuff. Windows is doing what they can to keep it from being pirated. I know it sucks for legit users but that's the price you pay.

handy
November 14th, 2009, 03:08 AM
I think that perhaps a prime reason for keeping support for legacy software, is that there are corporations/government departments, sometimes with many hundreds of bums on seats that can do all that they require using legacy software. Under these circumstances upgrading is a huge cost.

Due to the cost, these customers may therefore choose to not upgrade their OS to the new windows, or may even use the cost as a reason to jump ship to another system.

All of which I'm sure starts to play into the MS plan/desire for big customers to eventually all be using "The Cloud".

Which of course will have quite an effect on piracy. Though most piracy (at least in the so called developed nations) is not based in business, it is much more of a home user pass time.

As far as having software signed by MS; back in the days prior to vista (I have no experience with MS after XP) it used to cost a small fortune to have software signed by MS.

I think that this is a reason why so much software that was perfectly good, used to come up with the unsigned dialogue when you installed it.

If MS still charge for the signing service, I think that they should change that policy, as it certainly places a financial burden on small businesses & causes so much software - particularly drivers, to not be tested thoroughly.

[Edit:] When I was in business, the XP & Office activation thing was such a pain, that I used corporate editions of both XP & Office when I did system installations, both for new, upgraded machines, or repairs to corrupt systems. I'm quite sure that many small IT tech' businesses did exactly the same thing, as it saved so much time, you could have backup systems for customers or for the current (& past) hardware (motherboard/CPU) that you were using, in Ghost image format. So you could just cast the Ghost image & setup a new system or repair an old, really quickly. :D

falconindy
November 14th, 2009, 03:35 AM
Terribly written. Way too many words to say "backwards compatibility makes Win7 slow", "too many flavors", and "I don't like ribbon menus".

handy
November 14th, 2009, 04:24 AM
Terribly written. Way too many words to say "backwards compatibility makes Win7 slow", "too many flavors", and "I don't like ribbon menus".

I'd keep out of the journalism side of thing if I were you.

I don't think it is a natural talent of yours. :)

That wasn't a personal attack by the way, just an observation. ;)

schauerlich
November 14th, 2009, 04:27 AM
1) Windows hasn't hardly changed since Windows 95. 95 had a new interface that took some getting used to, but ended up being a good change in the end.
2) Whaaa? Ribbon? I don't like this. This is new. It's not what I'm used to. Bad! Change it back!


There's just no pleasing people.

falconindy
November 14th, 2009, 04:31 AM
I'd keep out of the journalism side of thing if I were you.

I don't think it is a natural talent of yours. :)

That wasn't a personal attack by the way, just an observation. ;)
Sorry if I was expecting content when reading a review. Don't worry about the journalism... hard science is in my blood.

The Funkbomb
November 14th, 2009, 04:36 AM
1) Windows hasn't hardly changed since Windows 95. 95 had a new interface that took some getting used to, but ended up being a good change in the end.
2) Whaaa? Ribbon? I don't like this. This is new. It's not what I'm used to. Bad! Change it back!


There's just no pleasing people.

:lolflag: I said the same thing.

handy
November 14th, 2009, 06:45 AM
Sorry if I was expecting content when reading a review. Don't worry about the journalism... hard science is in my blood.

That makes sense.

There are a variety of ways for people's minds to work, sometimes they are 180 degrees in opposition.

They are all equally valid though. :)

e.g. Many would much prefer to read (or write) the content on the linked to page in the OP than a 4 line summary.

Who would'a thunk it?

Freedom of expression & choice is all we (humanity) need to fight for.

Though there are others who are 180 degrees away from that statement, I can't possibly accept their position.

Peculiar that! :confused:

[Edit:] Though after spending a moment thinking about it, there is quite a difference between the fundamental (physiological) ways that people's brains work, & the attitudes that they choose to live by.

Though of course those too can change. :)

Hopefully.

mmix
November 14th, 2009, 07:37 AM
win7 64bit/32bit RC version was fine.

now fedora 12 64bit is running on the pc.

murderslastcrow
November 14th, 2009, 08:08 AM
So, here's my list of features from Windows 95 to Windows 7.

1. Transparency. @_@
2. CD/DVD Authoring (introduced in XP or 98, I believe).
3. Search function in start menu.
4. Grouped windows (did 95 also have grouped windows? Correct me if I'm wrong).
5. Uuhhhh... what else? 64-bit.

I mean, if XP compatibility in ReactOS or Windows 95 were perfect, and you could theme it to look alright, I have very little doubt that everyone would be downgrading like mad after finding out (or using ReactOS).

Really, after this many years very little has changed besides the interface and some networking components.

Forgive me for being harsh, but let's not be bashful. Windows' main selling point at this point is that it's Windows.

Frak
November 14th, 2009, 08:17 AM
1) Windows hasn't hardly changed since Windows 95. 95 had a new interface that took some getting used to, but ended up being a good change in the end.
2) Whaaa? Ribbon? I don't like this. This is new. It's not what I'm used to. Bad! Change it back!


There's just no pleasing people.
Same

Arup
November 14th, 2009, 08:26 AM
So, here's my list of features from Windows 95 to Windows 7.

1. Transparency. @_@
2. CD/DVD Authoring (introduced in XP or 98, I believe).
3. Search function in start menu.
4. Grouped windows (did 95 also have grouped windows? Correct me if I'm wrong).
5. Uuhhhh... what else? 64-bit.

I mean, if XP compatibility in ReactOS or Windows 95 were perfect, and you could theme it to look alright, I have very little doubt that everyone would be downgrading like mad after finding out (or using ReactOS).

Really, after this many years very little has changed besides the interface and some networking components.

Forgive me for being harsh, but let's not be bashful. Windows' main selling point at this point is that it's Windows.


Thats right plus the fact that manufacturers write drivers for Windows, makes it much easier to sell that aspect.

Dekkon
November 14th, 2009, 11:05 PM
http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-31012_7-10384068-10355804.html

Now, after having used Windows 7 exclusively for about four months on my PCs and even on my Mac, I realized that the impression Windows 95 made on me was far stronger than that of Windows 7 (or any other Windows).

Don't get me wrong. This is not a Windows 7-bashing article. Windows 7 is undoubtedly the most advanced and probably the best Windows ever. However, after 14 years, I think it's time Windows offered something more original than just improving and thriving on the success of Windows 95.

My knowledge is a little rusty but wasn't Windows 95 a transition from CLI to complete GUI interface?

Frak
November 14th, 2009, 11:19 PM
My knowledge is a little rusty but wasn't Windows 95 a transition from CLI to complete GUI interface?
As a default position for the OS? Yes.

First Windows to have a GUI? No.

toupeiro
November 14th, 2009, 11:33 PM
Im sorry, even if its better than Vista, its still not worth the price tag to me. Not with all I get using FOSS.

Better than Vista != Better than XP, you know, that version of windows that came out in 2002!

mmix
November 15th, 2009, 02:15 AM
I have tried reactos 0.4.0 svn.
It getting become production-level software.

mivo
November 15th, 2009, 02:47 AM
Im sorry, even if its better than Vista, its still not worth the price tag to me. Not with all I get using FOSS.

For most people it is free as they get it with their new computer (machines with Linux cost more, ironically). I paid 125 for my copy of W7 Pro. The price of three video games, or two to three times eating in a good restaurant. I'll use it on my main desktop for a few years, so, the cost is really marginal.

I run mostly FOSS applications even in Windows, but there is quite a bit of software that is better on Windows or only available for Windows (this applies vice versa as well). Then there is games ... I don't play as much as I used to ten or fifteen years ago, but I still enjoy titles like Dragon Age. It doesn't work well in Wine, at all, just like many new games.

I did play some games on my Linux desktop, but really good experiences I only made with native versions, like Quake Wars, NWN, Savage, and a few others. The choice was too limited to me, so when I had to decide which of my two desktops gets a new video card, the Win7 box won. I see you have a GTX 260, overclocked even. What are you using it for in Linux?

In the end, what works best for me is to use both OSes on dedicated machines (no dual booting). A desktop with Linux, one with Windows 7, a laptop with Linux, a netbook with XP, and another desktop that I fixed up and put XP on it because I had considered giving it away, though I might switch it over to Arch. Might change the laptop or netbook.

I used to be a Linux only guy for a few years, but I felt limited and in some cases a bit masochist (mostly when it came to gaming and I made compromises that were ideological but reduced my fun and caused frustration). Now I enjoy the best of both worlds, and that works best for me. Makes immune to various diseases such as zealotry and missionary fever.

Regenweald
November 15th, 2009, 02:48 AM
It is very true that the windows desktop paradigm has not changed since win95, but the Linux one is essentially the same ;). If you are arguing underlying architecture, then cool. But no desktop offers anything different really, Save for tiling it is all still desktop, windows, keyboard, mouse interaction.
Pick your poison.

Joe Ker1086
November 15th, 2009, 02:54 AM
No one can deny that 7 has great out of the box hardware compatibility but my problem with 7 is that it is really just a tweaked version of vista....thats fine and all, but not for 200 bucks...thats my problem with the whole thing