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youbuntu
November 12th, 2009, 03:50 PM
I have been hearing a lot about "Cloud computing" of late - a friend of mine was raving, yesterday, about a site called "EyeOS". In my opinion, I can see the attraction of cloud computing, but I just don't see why we should trust it. Let's look at what it does - you store data, which is often personal data, on a server, via the cloudOS' interface. How on EARTH can you tell whether or not said data is being spied upon, rifled through or copied and distributed elsewhere?.

People in this day and age, seem all too happy to sacrifice their freedom for convenience, by way of FaceBook, MySpace, Bebo etc, which seem to expose the whole world to the personal details of your life and relationships. Now I know I may have digressed a little there, but my point is that people seem to just hear about services like this, go to the site, read all the hype, and sign up, often with little or *no* consideration as to what is being done with their personal data!.

How do we know who, or what is running these cloudOS', and whether or not we can trust them?. I just don't agree with signing up to liberating all your files and folders to some unknown quantity, any more than I would trust Apple to store my data on MobileME - same applies.

I'd be very interested to hear your viewpoints - it seems that convenience comes at the price of personal privacy and freedom. The bottom line is NOONE knows who has root access to the servers upon which cloudOS' run, and noone has a clue what is being done with the data that *THEY* tell you is "private" and/or "protected". The interface of EyeOS is toy-like, and extremely basic, and besides - I don't NEED bandwidth to run a local OS on my machines, so why would I need this?.

Hmmm... what do you guys think?.

pookiebear
November 12th, 2009, 04:27 PM
I would treat it like an unsecured backup tool. If you have to/or want to use it, encrypt your data would be my rule of thumb.

Tibuda
November 12th, 2009, 04:27 PM
do you trust your data with strangers?

People trust their money with strangers. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank)

youbuntu
November 12th, 2009, 04:29 PM
People trust their money to strangers. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank)

Money is hardly the same, and it doesn't reveal a lot else about you, other than what you earn.

eric9477
November 12th, 2009, 04:33 PM
I'm with ya there. I feel a lot more secure with my os and files stored locally. You never know when a hacker is going to find there way into your online storage and exploit personal data. Not that they can't get into your local system, but it seems to happen less often.

Tibuda
November 12th, 2009, 04:34 PM
Money is hardly the same, and it doesn't reveal a lot else about you, other than what you earn.

It reveals much more than my data. They know where I spend my money. They how much I have spent at the supermarket, how much at bars, etc... Unless I pay all my stuff in currency (which is not the case), they know each transaction in my account.

eric9477
November 12th, 2009, 04:40 PM
True. My bank had to send me new credit and debit cards last year because somebody hacked the system and got the visa numbers of quite a few customers.


People trust their money with strangers. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank)

tacantara
November 12th, 2009, 04:41 PM
I'm on the fence with Cloud Computing. I've used online storage (i.e. Google Docs) to keep certain items that I might need to access in a pinch, but nothing on a large scale. After reading an article in PC World, I checked out a service called G.ho.st. They offer a virtual OS with various programs for editing documents and spreadsheets, etc. The "desktop" resembles something that I can only describe as a cross between Windows and KDE. It looks interesting, but I have a lot more looking at it to do before I move anything on to the 15GB of free storage that it offers.

youbuntu
November 12th, 2009, 04:45 PM
It reveals much more than my data. They know where I spend my money. They how much I have spent at the supermarket, how much at bars, etc... Unless I pay all my stuff in currency (which is not the case), they know each transaction in my account.


True. My bank had to send me new credit and debit cards last year because somebody hacked the system and got the visa numbers of quite a few customers.

Okay, but we're not talking about banks, are we.

eric9477
November 12th, 2009, 04:50 PM
No, just an exmaple of online security. Cloud computing and online storage is ok I guess as long as you use discression about what you store online.


Okay, but we're not talking about banks, are we.

youbuntu
November 12th, 2009, 04:54 PM
None of my immediate family use online banking - it is ASKING for trouble!. I have a pay-as-you-go Mastercard, but that is hardly making me vulnerable, as I control how much I top-up :).

As a matter of interest, why do you put your quoted parts AFTER your current reply?. It looks odd :p

ElSlunko
November 12th, 2009, 05:00 PM
The information I choose to store wouldn't be very private or capable of endangering my image. Then again not much I have or do would be included in the latter :P

eric9477
November 12th, 2009, 05:00 PM
None of my immediate family use online banking - it is ASKING for trouble!. I have a pay-as-you-go Mastercard, but that is hardly making me vulnerable, as I control how much I top-up :).

As a matter of interest, why do you put your quoted parts AFTER your current reply?. It looks odd :p

I guess it does look a little out of place, never really thought about it before :)

ElSlunko
November 12th, 2009, 05:04 PM
It's fine as long as you have common sense about what to store and what not to. If you're busy storing questionable content anywhere on the internet you've got bigger issues with common sense than having to worry about whether or not to use cloud storage. Can you feel safe? No, not anywhere on the internet.

mkvnmtr
November 12th, 2009, 05:14 PM
I do not trust storage on my own computers. It is a sure thing I will not trust my data stored on other equipment. For that reason there is nothing on my machines that I mind anyone seeing, just family photos.

jamest09
November 12th, 2009, 05:31 PM
Is EyeOS still going? Haven't had a look at that for a couple of years now.

youbuntu
November 12th, 2009, 05:32 PM
Is EyeOS still going? Haven't had a look at that for a couple of years now.

It's still very crap! :p

jamest09
November 12th, 2009, 05:34 PM
It's still very crap! :p

Yes I've just had a look, looks more or less the same as it was, but now they use the word cloud on the website :)

Tristam Green
November 12th, 2009, 05:44 PM
The cloud can [insert vulgar verb] my [insert vulgar noun].

I've got enough woes with banks, my employers, my doctors, and my cell company getting data on me.

Slug71
November 12th, 2009, 06:40 PM
I honestly think Microsoft is going to go down with Cloud.

lisati
November 12th, 2009, 06:47 PM
It reveals much more than my data. They know where I spend my money. They how much I have spent at the supermarket, how much at bars, etc... Unless I pay all my stuff in currency (which is not the case), they know each transaction in my account.

Sometimes it's not worth the hassle for the employees to find out. I used to work as a programmer, many years ago, for an IT company that processed and stored transactions for a number of banks, and where data security and privacy was a big thing. The only "hack" I knew about to get round their security was such that if I chose to use it to gain unauthorised access to financial data, it wouldn't be long before I got caught out.

youbuntu
November 12th, 2009, 07:49 PM
I honestly think Microsoft is going to go down with Cloud.

There's always hope ;)

Tristam Green
November 12th, 2009, 07:50 PM
i honestly think microsoft is going to go down with cloud.

incorrect, sir.

pwnst*r
November 12th, 2009, 08:03 PM
classic case of recurring discussion. cloud computing threads are getting tired. (no offense OP, but they are)

V for Vincent
November 12th, 2009, 08:09 PM
I like it. I use ubuntu one, aviary, online banking and subversion. Love 'em all.

Mornedhel
November 12th, 2009, 09:12 PM
I like it. I use ubuntu one, aviary, online banking and subversion. Love 'em all.

*sigh*

Let me say this again. Those are typical server-client architectures. That architecture existed before the Internet. Unfortunately, management and marketing types have taken "cloud computing" to the buzzword level, and liberally apply it to basically anything where a server is involved. By that definition, a website is cloud computing. IRC is cloud computing. My frikken 486 did cloud computing.


Online banking is, basically, a website and a database. It does get a little cloudy because at those scales you have to do some data replication, but it's still mostly a tree.
Ubuntu One is a central storage space and a client to talk to that storage space. You can implement the same idea with a daemon to rsync data.
Aviary and other web office suites are really advanced websites.
Subversion is a central storage space and a client to talk to that storage space in a smart, version-control manner.


In that sense, cloud computing is not "bad news". It's not news at all.

Freenet and BitTorrent are examples of cloud computing. Mercurial is cloud computing (where Subversion is centralized, in Mercurial you can push to a repository anywhere). The Internet, as a whole, is cloud computing (a biiig cloud) : services and entities talking to each other, data existing without anyone managing it centrally.

youbuntu
November 12th, 2009, 10:40 PM
*sigh*

Let me say this again. Those are typical server-client architectures. That architecture existed before the Internet. Unfortunately, management and marketing types have taken "cloud computing" to the buzzword level, and liberally apply it to basically anything where a server is involved. By that definition, a website is cloud computing. IRC is cloud computing. My frikken 486 did cloud computing.


Online banking is, basically, a website and a database. It does get a little cloudy because at those scales you have to do some data replication, but it's still mostly a tree.
Ubuntu One is a central storage space and a client to talk to that storage space. You can implement the same idea with a daemon to rsync data.
Aviary and other web office suites are really advanced websites.
Subversion is a central storage space and a client to talk to that storage space in a smart, version-control manner.


In that sense, cloud computing is not "bad news". It's not news at all.

Freenet and BitTorrent are examples of cloud computing. Mercurial is cloud computing (where Subversion is centralized, in Mercurial you can push to a repository anywhere). The Internet, as a whole, is cloud computing (a biiig cloud) : services and entities talking to each other, data existing without anyone managing it centrally.

That's EXACTLY what I was thinking!. Email is cloud computing, in that case, and that's been around since arpanet in the 1960's - haha!. Cloud my 4rse - more like the fog of confusion. Cloud computing?. No thanks, a physical HDD does me fine ;)

chriskin
November 12th, 2009, 10:41 PM
yes, it is bad news
yes, i trust my data with strangers

markp1989
November 12th, 2009, 10:58 PM
i like the idea of a cloud (in theory), just as long as you use common sence with what you store on it.

I wouldnt use it because im to paranoid tbh

V for Vincent
November 12th, 2009, 11:18 PM
*sigh*

Let me say this again. Those are typical server-client architectures. That architecture existed before the Internet. Unfortunately, management and marketing types have taken "cloud computing" to the buzzword level, and liberally apply it to basically anything where a server is involved. By that definition, a website is cloud computing. IRC is cloud computing. My frikken 486 did cloud computing.


Online banking is, basically, a website and a database. It does get a little cloudy because at those scales you have to do some data replication, but it's still mostly a tree.
Ubuntu One is a central storage space and a client to talk to that storage space. You can implement the same idea with a daemon to rsync data.
Aviary and other web office suites are really advanced websites.
Subversion is a central storage space and a client to talk to that storage space in a smart, version-control manner.


In that sense, cloud computing is not "bad news". It's not news at all.

Freenet and BitTorrent are examples of cloud computing. Mercurial is cloud computing (where Subversion is centralized, in Mercurial you can push to a repository anywhere). The Internet, as a whole, is cloud computing (a biiig cloud) : services and entities talking to each other, data existing without anyone managing it centrally.

I'll thank you not to patronize me. I'm a computer science student, so I have a pretty good idea of what the web's architecture looks like. For one thing, the services I mentioned were referred to by others in this thread, so I don't see why I shouldn't share my experience. Moreover, though I'll agree the term "cloud computing" is being used too liberally nowadays, there is a difference in emphasis on the role of the server. With regular websites, it's just, well, "the server". With more complex server based apps, it takes a role traditionally fulfilled by the desktop. Still just a server, but there is a paradigm shift that people need to label somehow.

This is turning into a matter of semantics, though. Look at GlossyWhite's last post. "A physical HDD does me fine"? So remote storage *is* cloud computing, then? Or, at the very least, cloud computing by someone else's definition?

See, I was merely describing my experience with services mentioned by others in this thread, which they all group under "cloud computing".

youbuntu
November 12th, 2009, 11:35 PM
The term "cloud computing" is just a complete nonsense designed to sell virtual products to people who think they need them; the whole *internet* is a cloud - hasn't it ALWAYS been termed "the cloud"?.

Every single entity on the internet is a cloud computer or node, in relation to all *other* devices which are not connected directly to them, locally. We have pen drives and external hard disks coming out of our ears, and they're cheaper than fish and chips nowadays - I thought pen drives were the answer?. Now the marketeers are bored with touting the external storage solutions, they had to think up some other BS idea to sell to us, and what better than to re-badge something we have ALL done for many a year?!.

Ever heard of rapidshare?... it is FREE to upload your file, then download it again. You can setup a LAMP server, also FREE.

Carry a pen drive for goodness sake - it is in YOUR pocket, under YOUR control, and you only have to pay ONCE for it.

As I said - cloud my 4rse!!

Mornedhel
November 12th, 2009, 11:51 PM
I'll thank you not to patronize me. I'm a computer science student, so I have a pretty good idea of what the web's architecture looks like.

Great, so I can rely on you having a pretty clear view of what actually is cloud computing.


For one thing, the services I mentioned were referred to by others in this thread, so I don't see why I shouldn't share my experience.

Soo, because they are using a term incorrectly, you (moreover, one who has a reasonable grasp of the technologies involved) should propagate that mistake ?


Moreover, though I'll agree the term "cloud computing" is being used too liberally nowadays, there is a difference in emphasis on the role of the server. With regular websites, it's just, well, "the server". With more complex server based apps, it takes a role traditionally fulfilled by the desktop. Still just a server, but there is a paradigm shift that people need to label somehow.

If you have heard of mainframes and dumb terminals (and as you are a CS student, I'll assume you have), you'll have to admit that the idea is hardly new. The mainframe is on another continent.

Besides, server-based apps make for one out of the four examples you gave. The other three are apps talking to a server.


This is turning into a matter of semantics, though. Look at GlossyWhite's last post. "A physical HDD does me fine"? So remote storage *is* cloud computing, then? Or, at the very least, cloud computing by someone else's definition?

I don't presume to know how GlossyWhite defines cloud computing, but remote storage of the data being manipulated would be *one* of the terms in my definition, yes. I don't think anyone's definition says that networking is never involved, and networking is not very interesting if the data is entirely on the machine in front of you.


See, I was merely describing my experience with services mentioned by others in this thread, which they all group under "cloud computing".

So if everybody in a thread says "Ubuntu is Linux because Ubuntu made Linux popular", does that mean "Ubuntu == Linux" ? I'd expect you in particular, CS student, to know the difference.

(Yes, I realize I'm still patronizing you -- well, guess what, I teach to CS students, although my own field is more math-oriented.)

handy
November 12th, 2009, 11:52 PM
I use web based email, keeping quite a stock of files on my two ISP's servers.

I also rely heavily on the Firefox add-on Xmarks. Xmarks keeps my bookmarks synchronised across multiple systems. I read all of the Xmarks (they were called Foxmarks) confidentiality agreement (what fun that is) & they look good. They also allow you to encrypt your data as well.

I play the MMORPG - Guild Wars, where the characters I build & all of their gaming is stored on the GW servers.

The above - email,bookmarks & MMORPG, is about it for me & the cloud. I don't like where the computing future is going. The internet is right now involved in a great battle between those that want to own it, & those that want to protect the freedoms that we currently (mostly) still enjoy.

mr-woof
November 13th, 2009, 12:51 AM
I don't use any "Cloud" storage at the moment, If i were to use it I would encrypt anything that is stored so surely that would be defeating the purpose of having quick and easy data?

As said further up in the thread, I'll probably stick to pen drives or my portable ssd drive for data :)

eric9477
November 13th, 2009, 09:30 PM
So it seems different people think of cloud computing different ways. I know there have always been pc/server relationships, but when I hear the term "cloud computing", this is what I think of:


From: http://www.thinkgos.com/cloud/cloudcomputing.html

"Cloud computing is an idea that what makes up your "personal computer" - your desktop, your apps, and your data, - can live and run on the Internet instead of on your hard drive."

markbuntu
November 13th, 2009, 11:28 PM
All it takes is one incompetent admin to lose a million people's personal stuff in the cloud. This has already happened once, it will become ubuiquitous as cloud computing spreads.

To really be safe you will need to have your data in multiple clouds, or back it up on your pc or iphone or something and keep it all in sync somehow. It will waste huge amounts of everyone's time. It will be a productivity vampire of epic proportion.

If any incompetent is going to lose all my data it better be me.

jdrodrig
November 13th, 2009, 11:47 PM
I think we are talking enough about the security protocols developed to transmit banking info in websites, SSL...something analog could be developed for cloud (I like to think it as converting your home PC as the GUI to a shared kernel stored on a basement in Nevada).....

jdrodrig
November 13th, 2009, 11:49 PM
Also, come to think of it, cloud computing could be a "fix" to the explosion of multi-core cpus without a corresponding multi-core software development.....

instead of wasting 60 of the 64 cores your computer might have in 2012, you can buy one with 4 cores (internet core, anti-virus core, openoffice-core, and cloud-core) and buy cpu time for the intensive applications you might use...

jdrodrig
November 13th, 2009, 11:55 PM
If you have heard of mainframes and dumb terminals (and as you are a CS student, I'll assume you have



I can perfectly picturing thinking of your students as "dumb terminals"...

but more seriously, revealing you are instructor does not make it better than you patronize people around here...in fact, on my book, makes it worse...

jdrodrig
November 13th, 2009, 11:58 PM
*sigh*

Let me say this again. Those are typical server-client architectures. That architecture existed before the Internet. Unfortunately, management and marketing types have taken "cloud computing" to the buzzword level, and liberally apply it to basically anything where a server is involved. By that definition, a website is cloud computing. IRC is cloud computing. My frikken 486 did cloud computing.


Online banking is, basically, a website and a database. It does get a little cloudy because at those scales you have to do some data replication, but it's still mostly a tree.
Ubuntu One is a central storage space and a client to talk to that storage space. You can implement the same idea with a daemon to rsync data.
Aviary and other web office suites are really advanced websites.
Subversion is a central storage space and a client to talk to that storage space in a smart, version-control manner.


In that sense, cloud computing is not "bad news". It's not news at all.

Freenet and BitTorrent are examples of cloud computing. Mercurial is cloud computing (where Subversion is centralized, in Mercurial you can push to a repository anywhere). The Internet, as a whole, is cloud computing (a biiig cloud) : services and entities talking to each other, data existing without anyone managing it centrally.

Why the *sigh*? ..too tired to hit copy-paste? what is next, write it on your blog and link it to your signature?...I might be particularly impatient today, but I don't think this follows the spirit of these great forums...

Dullstar
November 14th, 2009, 12:21 AM
Oh, clouds are AWESOME! They're pretty, white, fluffy, and they turn a nice gray colour when they are full!

==Sarcasm Over==

Cloud computing is a bad idea -- sure, maybe some things already are, but once we dip into the stuff most of us keep on our hard drives, you've got a problem.

youbuntu
November 14th, 2009, 01:46 AM
Oh, clouds are AWESOME! They're pretty, white, fluffy, and they turn a nice gray colour when they are full!

==Sarcasm Over==

Cloud computing is a bad idea -- sure, maybe some things already are, but once we dip into the stuff most of us keep on our hard drives, you've got a problem.

Yes, a VERY bad idea which, worryingly, people are becoming sold on.

RabbitWho
November 14th, 2009, 01:58 AM
It reveals much more than my data. They know where I spend my money. They how much I have spent at the supermarket, how much at bars, etc... Unless I pay all my stuff in currency (which is not the case), they know each transaction in my account.

That's still different to something like Facebook, where you do personality tests which the government collects to make citizen profiles. Maybe each test is 5 rubbish questions for every one that actually says something about your psychology, but that's enough. Plus they know your friends, your thoughts, your opinions, your politics.
Maybe that's shite, but if the government was interested, nowadays, they could know pretty much everything about pretty much everyone.

jdrodrig
November 14th, 2009, 02:39 AM
Yes, a VERY bad idea which, worryingly, people are becoming sold on.

New ideas are always received with some healthy degree of skepticism (sic), but I think that looking at companies actually using cloud services now, we can get an idea of whether it is possible to design security protocols...

Amazon is an example of an early provider of wholesale of cloud services, take a look at their "success cases"

http://aws.amazon.com/solutions/case-studies/#hpc

pwnst*r
November 14th, 2009, 03:23 AM
Yes, a VERY bad idea which, worryingly, people are becoming sold on.

for businesses, YEP.

Chronon
November 14th, 2009, 10:00 AM
I think it's awesome for certain things. I think BOINC, folding@home, etc. are great.

SomeGuyDude
November 14th, 2009, 10:17 AM
Think of it like this:

Where is your money, right now? Is it in cash, in your wallet? Or do you have it in a bank? If you have it in a bank, realize that, right now, all of the money you have and that you rely on to live is data sitting on a computer that you don't own and can only access virtually. A good hacker or a rough power surge and... bloop! You're in the poorhouse. I won't even get into investments.

If we're willing to stake our entire monetary existence in computers that we have no direct access to, why not our files?

Paqman
November 14th, 2009, 10:21 AM
"Cloud computing" is a supremely vague term. Depending on how you define it, we've either:
all been using cloud computing for years
are just switching to it now
it's something that's going to happen in the future.


1) According to one definition, all web apps are classed as "cloud computing". If you've got a Gmail or Hotmail account, or you use Flickr or Twitter, then you've been using cloud computing for ever.

2) According to another definition, cloud computing is the use of virtualised systems deployed across server farms. Rent yourself a server from a hosting company and you'll probably actually be getting a virtual machine living on their cloud. This is relatively new, and has obvious benefits for the hosting company. It's just the way things are going. To the end user it makes absolutely no difference whether their server is installed onto virtual or actual hardware. So who cares?

3) The last definition, the one that has the tin hat brigade cacking themselves, is the possibility that in the future we'll have enough bandwidth across a ubiquitous connection that all our data, all our apps, and even things traditionally handled by a local OS, will be in the cloud. This may or may not happen, and isn't really worth getting cross about until it does IMO.

The problem is, "cloud computing" currently means all three of these, and nobody has any idea what anybody else is actually talking about. Confusion (and it's bedfellow paranoia) reigns supreme.

K.Mandla
November 14th, 2009, 12:21 PM
Is it bad news? Yes. Do I trust my data with strangers? No.

http://kmandla.wordpress.com/2009/07/07/the-cloud-is-a-lie/

Paqman
November 14th, 2009, 01:09 PM
Is it bad news? Yes. Do I trust my data with strangers? No.

http://kmandla.wordpress.com/2009/07/07/the-cloud-is-a-lie/

You cite Gmail as a privacy issue because it's crawled by Google's spiders. Yet, you're not blocking their spiders from your blog in your robots.txt (http://kmandla.wordpress.com/robots.txt).

pwnst*r
November 14th, 2009, 02:50 PM
lol, called.

pwnst*r
November 14th, 2009, 02:53 PM
also, Dragonbite's response is spot on, and exactly why i keep stating that for corporations, it's good.


The cloud as Google has it is one thing, but where the cloud is going to increase is in corporate private clouds.

This way a corporation can maintain control of their data as well as make any/all apps available to all of their users complete with custom tweaks and possibly even allow remote users to log in (VPN?) and have the full benefit without anything moving onto the users computer (and thus potentially be lost/stolen).

Think Exchange and its web interface and extrapolate it over all of the applications on your work computer.

K.Mandla
November 14th, 2009, 02:53 PM
You cite Gmail as a privacy issue because it's crawled by Google's spiders. Yet, you're not blocking their spiders from your blog in your robots.txt (http://kmandla.wordpress.com/robots.txt).
Actually, I mention privacy issues with GMail because I know from firsthand experience that they mine your email for keywords and use it for their own HR purposes. They contacted me directly by e-mail and were quite enthusiastic about hiring me as a Linux software developer ... until they found out I have no academic background in computers.

And also, I haven't looked, but I don't think I can modify the robots.txt file for Wordpress.com.

Paqman
November 14th, 2009, 03:31 PM
Actually, I mention privacy issues with GMail because I know from firsthand experience that they mine your email for keywords and use it for their own HR purposes. They contacted me directly by e-mail and were quite enthusiastic about hiring me as a Linux software developer ... until they found out I have no academic background in computers.


How do you know they got that from trawling your inbox?



And also, I haven't looked, but I don't think I can modify the robots.txt file for Wordpress.com.

Maybe you should look.

Even if you can't, there's nothing stopping you from hosting a Wordpress blog somewhere you can. My friendly challenge to you: talk is cheap, put your money where your mouth is. :)

K.Mandla
November 14th, 2009, 04:15 PM
How do you know they got that from trawling your inbox?
Should I assume that everyone who has a Gmail account gets job offers for software developer?

Maybe you should look.

Even if you can't, there's nothing stopping you from hosting a Wordpress blog somewhere you can. My friendly challenge to you: talk is cheap, put your money where your mouth is. :)
Fair enough. But maybe I misunderstand something because it seems like we're talking about two different things.

Is allowing Google to crawl over a public site really the same as trolling your e-mail and making job offers? Perhaps the two are equivalent under some definition of "cloud computing," but somehow they don't seem related.

Again, perhaps I misunderstand.

Paqman
November 14th, 2009, 04:28 PM
Should I assume that everyone who has a Gmail account gets job offers for software developer?


Far from it. But it sounds to me like you're jumping to a conclusion. Do you actually *know* that's how they got your details? I get agencies randomly calling me up and emailing me about jobs all the time. I never suspect that they've been peeking in my inbox.

Are Google just guilty until proven innocent?



Is allowing Google to crawl over a public site really the same as trolling your e-mail and making job offers?

No, it's not the same. Your emails are indexed, but that data stays in-house. You blog posts are also indexed, and included in search results, which are publicly available to the entire internet. Allowing your blog to be crawled is potentially a privacy breach orders of magnitude above any in-house Google use of your email data. Especially when you've got no actual evidence that your emails are being read by anything other than bots.

NightwishFan
November 14th, 2009, 04:55 PM
I do not trust anyone with truly private data, especially Google. I think that if I ever had need of a cloud I would make use of it.

I have an Ubuntu-One account, but that is mostly because I wanted to test it. I have no private data there. I really do not see Canonical making a point of snooping though.

K.Mandla
November 14th, 2009, 05:01 PM
Far from it. But it sounds to me like you're jumping to a conclusion. Do you actually *know* that's how they got your details? I get agencies randomly calling me up and emailing me about jobs all the time. I never suspect that they've been peeking in my inbox.

Are Google just guilty until proven innocent?
Perhaps as the recipient of the e-mail it seems just a little more obvious.

No, it's not the same. Your emails are indexed, but that data stays in-house. You blog posts are also indexed, and included in search results, which are publicly available to the entire internet. Allowing your blog to be crawled is potentially a privacy breach orders of magnitude above any in-house Google use of your email data. Especially when you've got no actual evidence that your emails are being read by anything other than bots.
I suppose this is where I'll duck out of the argument, mostly because again, I seem to see things in the reverse of what you're describing. I really don't believe indexing publicly posted page content is anything near using an e-mail service as a juncture for finding new employees. Perhaps we just differ on that; the second just seems less scrupulous to me.

And, as you say, since I have no means of actually proving that any human being at Google actually reads the e-mails, I'll step aside.

I'm afraid my opinion on the matter isn't changed though; if anything, I fear I may be even less enthused about web-based services.