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hellmet
November 12th, 2009, 08:43 AM
I'm a graduate and I've been looking for a job as a Linux Systems Administrator for the past 3-4 months, without any success whatsoever. I've tried Monster, Dice, Indeed, Craigslist, Google. Submitted my resume, redid my resume, applied to several matching jobs, in vain. No calls, or emails or interviews. Just some from consultancies. Useless. My sys admin. internship seems to be of no use either.

Being a non-US-citizen is hard enough. Add to that, several companies are asking for 'solid' or 'strong' experience with some technologies even for entry-level/internship opportunities. Its depressing. Is there something thats lower than 'entry-level' ? How am I to have experience without starting work?

I'm very confident I have the skills to grow into a very efficient Linux sys admin. Give me a chance! Please!
-------------
End of rant
p.s: I'd appreciate it if you could direct me to [I]any jobopening in the field of Sys. Admin.

Exodist
November 12th, 2009, 08:47 AM
I feel your pain. I got laid off work last week as a CNC Machinist and I been putting my resumes in all week. Also put one in for a Linux Admin / Network Technician. I will let you know if they call.. lol

HappinessNow
November 12th, 2009, 08:47 AM
I'm a graduate and I've been looking for a job as a Linux Systems Administrator for the past 3-4 months, without any success whatsoever. I've tried Monster, Dice, Indeed, Craigslist, Google. Submitted my resume, redid my resume, applied to several matching jobs, in vain. No calls, or emails or interviews. Just some from consultancies. Useless. My sys admin. internship seems to be of no use either.

Being a non-US-citizen is hard enough. Add to that, several companies are asking for 'solid' or 'strong' experience with some technologies even for entry-level/internship opportunities. Its depressing. Is there something thats lower than 'entry-level' ? How am I to have experience without starting work?

I'm very confident I have the skills to grow into a very efficient Linux sys admin. Give me a chance! Please!
-------------
End of rant
p.s: I'd appreciate it if you could direct me to [I]any jobopening in the field of Sys. Admin.Tell the company that you most want to work for that you will volunteer for free for 6 months FULL TIME, in that time you can prove your worth and they will no doubt hire you.

Sounds odd?, sounds plausible?...yeah I know! but in todays market I know many people who have done just that, and they are now happily employed after giving 6 months of their time to prove themselves. They have become indispensable and a worthy asset.

JBAlaska
November 12th, 2009, 08:59 AM
Tell the company that you most want to work for that you will volunteer for free for 6 months FULL TIME, in that time you can prove your worth and they will no doubt hire you.

Sounds odd?, sounds plausible?...yeah I know! but in todays market I know many people who have done just that, and they are now happily employed after giving 6 months of their time to prove themselves. They have become indispensable and a worthy asset.

In the early 80's I made this offer to a major silicon valley VAR, I started the next morning and after 3 months I started my own Company.

hellmet, keep at it! The last time I went to a CompUSA (when there was a CompUSA) the place was lousy with freshly minted MCSE's

HappinessNow
November 12th, 2009, 09:00 AM
In the early 80's I made this offer to a major silicon valley VAR, I started the next morning and after 3 months I started my own Company.

hellmet, keep at it! The last time I went to a CompUSA (when there was a CompUSA) the place was lousy with freshly minted MCSE'sStarting your own company is sometimes the best option out of all the options.

hellmet
November 12th, 2009, 09:10 AM
Starting your own company is sometimes the best option out of all the options.
However, I have invested a lot of money into my education here, in Indian currency. Its highly impossible to invest anywhere else, without first earning anything back.

I am more than willing to work for free. All I need now is experience and learning. People say I'm a fool to try entry-level, and that I should enter as someone with experience (fake resume). I hate it, and I will never do that.

I will never stop trying. Any ideas about other job avenues? I'm thinking LUGs and other Linux forums. I will keep at it for a while.

TuckLive
November 12th, 2009, 09:45 AM
I know your pain hellmet. I searched for a job in IT doing network admin, sys admin, or information security for 8 months before I finally landed a job. I was afraid it would be hard to find a job so I started looking well before I graduated and luckily I was hired 4 months before graduation. I didn't find a job using online services either, but through my career services department at my university. Best of luck to you.

Companies expect students to graduate college and have 10 years of experience. #-o

Somme
November 12th, 2009, 09:50 AM
Tell the company that you most want to work for that you will volunteer for free for 6 months FULL TIME, in that time you can prove your worth and they will no doubt hire you.

Sounds odd?, sounds plausible?...yeah I know! but in todays market I know many people who have done just that, and they are now happily employed after giving 6 months of their time to prove themselves. They have become indispensable and a worthy asset.

And where you would get the money for living ? The idea in general is great, tough, not for 6 months anyway.

HappinessNow
November 12th, 2009, 09:50 AM
However, I have invested a lot of money into my education here, in Indian currency. Its highly impossible to invest anywhere else, without first earning anything back.

I am more than willing to work for free. All I need now is experience and learning. People say I'm a fool to try entry-level, and that I should enter as someone with experience (fake resume). I hate it, and I will never do that.

I will never stop trying. Any ideas about other job avenues? I'm thinking LUGs and other Linux forums. I will keep at it for a while.
Try Universities, all and any University (even community colleges).

HappinessNow
November 12th, 2009, 09:51 AM
And where you would get the money for living ? The idea in general is great, tough, not for 6 months anyway.

He's out of work anyway, time will pass the same either way.

hellmet
November 12th, 2009, 09:53 AM
I know your pain hellmet. I searched for a job in IT doing network admin, sys admin, or information security for 8 months before I finally landed a job in security. I was afraid it would be hard to find a job so I started looking well before I graduated and luckily I was hired 4 months before graduation. I didn't find a job using online services either, but through my career services department at my university. Best of luck to you.

Companies expect students to graduate college and have 10 years of experience. #-o
Career services center. Thanks! Will talk to them tomorrow! And congrats on landing a job!


And where you would get the money for living ? The idea in general is great, tough, not for 6 months anyway.I was under the same impression. But, during these last few days, I've been wondering if I should just work for paltry sums. I think 'for free' is also an option I should consider.

Try Universities, all and any University (even community colleges).
Yes. I will!
@All - Thank you for being nice and understanding. I will try harder, you guys as my inspiration.

the8thstar
November 12th, 2009, 10:06 AM
You should call all the companies you worked for as a trainee and also get in touch with all the IT professionals you've met while being a student, including your teachers.

Networking with people is your best way to land a job. There is always someone who can recommend you to someone who knows someone who knows someone... who wants to hire a new worker. See what I mean?

Good luck and keep us updated!

Irihapeti
November 12th, 2009, 10:34 AM
Here's a guy with some rather different ideas, which is always useful when the usual things aren't working.

http://corcodilos.com/blog/

Muppeteer
November 18th, 2009, 06:09 AM
I'm also having this problem. I'm trying to get a linux admin job, and even advertised myself to volunteer for 6 months, not a single call. That's how hard it is to get a job, nobody will even take you for free :lolflag:

hellmet
November 18th, 2009, 06:43 AM
^ Here is wishing you all luck man!

scorp123
November 18th, 2009, 06:53 AM
Being a non-US-citizen is hard enough. Well, the US of A aren't exactly in a good shape if you haven't noticed. They already have millions of jobless people of their own. I doubt they will easily give away any job to foreigners ...

I have friends who lost their "green card" status because their US employer had to fire them because of the bad economy and what not. No big deal. They simply returned back to Europe.

Which leads me to what I want to suggest: Why USA? Why not other continents? You seem to be from India ... so does it really matter to which foreign country you emigrate to? USA ... or UK, or Germany, or Switzerland ... wouldn't it all be the same to you?

You asked for job listings. Well. How about Switzerland then? Our climate sucks, yes. But crime rates are extremely low, public security and safety is extremely high, living standards are extremely high, and the pay for IT professionals is excellent. And it doesn't matter much that you speak none of the official local languages (German, French, Italian, Raeto-Romansh) -- when it comes to IT then English is perfectly accepted as additional inofficial "national" language.

All this Swiss job web sites are in English ... as English is not a local language it's obvious the web sites are indeed intended for foreigners interested to work here:

http://www.jobsingeneva.com/?sector=it
http://www.adecco.ch/home/index.asp?cl=e
http://www.swissjobjournal.com/
http://www.swisstalents.org/swissjobs/default.htm
http://www.manpower.ch/en/

Also a good starting point are the "usual suspects" (= the companies most likely to have a job for you):
- large banks
- large corporations who happen to be present here
- pharmaceutical companies (we got tons of those too)

So I'd also give these companies a look:

http://www.ubs.com/1/e/career_candidates/flash.html
https://www.credit-suisse.com/careers/en/
http://h10055.www1.hp.com/jobsathp/content/home/home.asp?Lang=DEde&area=CH
http://www.ibm.com/employment/ch/
http://www.sun.com/corp_emp/search.cgi?loc=CH


Google will find the rest for you. Fact is that English-speaking professionals with the right profile can get jobs here. I worked for Hewlett-Packard here in Switzerland for seven years (2000 - 2007) and I have worked with Americans, Brits, Canadians, Cubans, Ecuadorians, Columbians, French, Spaniards, Italians, Turks, Croatians, Serbs, Egyptians, Algerians, Tunesians, Albanians, Mexicans, Germans, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegians, Romanians, Pakistanis, Indians, Chinese, Japanese .... right here in Switzerland.

And while we're at it: Other European countries such as Germany most likely will also allow qualified foreigners to take jobs there. Germany has a very large industrial sector. They produce a lot more than just cars. And all those companies have IT departments too ... I know for fact that in Germany they "import" Indians for specific jobs ...

http://gecs.wordpress.com/2008/09/11/germany-in-need-of-skilled-indian-professionals/


Again ... this is not to flame the US of A ... But let's face it: US economy isn't exactly in a good shape. So if I were looking for a job and emigrating is not a problem then I'd try European countries ...

Just my 0.02

brian183
November 18th, 2009, 06:57 AM
Hey if you know how to code then maybe try and go for a web programming position for a small company that has promise in growth. While writing code just build an awesome infrastructure as the company grows and then you'll have linux sys-admin plus programming experience on your resume.

The reason I suggest this is I always see a demand for these type of positions online. Also, I know a few people that have done exactly this. A possible benefit to this is you might get a real piece of the company you sign on with (be sure to ask for stake in the company) and cash in.

Good luck.

-brian

toupeiro
November 18th, 2009, 07:06 AM
Couple of things regarding Linux Jobs:

1) Even an entry level position as a linux administrator is rarely ever an entry level position. They usually require a certain amount of experience to even qualify.

2) You can't be a CNC machinist one day, and a "Linux Administrator" the next day no matter what piece of paper you get that says otherwise. The same could be said about a Linux Admin reading a book and attempting to bore a small block ford motor .030 over. IT Environments where a dedicated linux position would exist are generally large, complex and diverse and it takes years to get a holistic view of how to properly support an environment like that whether your primary discipline is Linux or Windows. You may have to start yourself off small, with entry level help desk positions and get promoted up if you don't have the in industry experience to fall back on.

Don't give up, but don't get discouraged either. Best of luck!

Frak
November 18th, 2009, 07:10 AM
Welcome to what we call "The help desk". You work your way up the chain from there.

Irihapeti
November 18th, 2009, 07:10 AM
I found a link that might be useful to someone.

http://theworkinggeek.com/2009/11/how-to-show-open-source-experience-in-your-job-hun.html

scorp123
November 18th, 2009, 07:19 AM
Welcome to what we call "The help desk". You work your way up the chain from there. That's exactly how my career started. I picked up phones and wrote down what the problem was, and then gave the trouble-ticked to a support engineer ...

At one point I stopped passing the problem to the support engineer and instead solved the trouble-tickets myself. Taddaaaaaa. Promotion. Better income. A Linux box on my desk and the promise that more will come if I prove myself ...

That was 12 years ago. I've been UNIX and Linux admin ever since.

Frak
November 18th, 2009, 07:21 AM
That's exactly how my career started. I picked up phones and wrote down what the problem was, and then gave the trouble-ticked to a support engineer ...

At one point I stopped passing the problem to the support engineer and instead solved the trouble-tickets myself. Taddaaaaaa. Promotion. Better income. A Linux box on my desk and the promise that more will come if I prove myself ...

That was 12 years ago. I've been UNIX and Linux admin ever since.
I couldn't answer phones because I have a stammer.

Taddaaaaa. Promotion. :)

ZeroSpawn
November 18th, 2009, 07:36 AM
I'm in the same boat, I just graduated with a BS in Electrical Engineering. I been trying to find a job in digital design, embedded systems, and microprocessing programming for the past 1 1/2 years. Still no luck for me. hell the university can't even find a job for me. And to put a cherry on top of things I'm rendered disabled from a recent auto accident. :D

Game is over for me.\\:D/

scorp123
November 18th, 2009, 07:48 AM
I couldn't answer phones because I have a stammer. Cheater :D

Khakilang
November 18th, 2009, 08:04 AM
I am in the same position as you 7 years ago. They simply think people in their mid 40s are over the hill and couldn't keep up with the fast pace of modern it technology. So I strive out on my own at least make myself useful. i sure you will think of some thing at least you know coding. Good luck.

toupeiro
November 18th, 2009, 08:12 AM
I am in the same position as you 7 years ago. They simply think people in their mid 40s are over the hill and couldn't keep up with the fast pace of modern it technology. So I strive out on my own at least make myself useful. i sure you will think of some thing at least you know coding. Good luck.

Some of the most brilliant IT people I've ever met in my life are now, unfortunately, dead, retired or are within 5 years of being retired. I'm still young, but I am where I am partly because I've been able to pick many things up fast with no up front training, but also because I've had very, VERY good mentors over the years who were graceous enough to have taught me the things they've learned over their whole careers. Judging someone in IT by their age is a sign to me that they have no business hiring IT people...

Luke has no name
November 18th, 2009, 09:51 AM
I know this sounds like a jerk thing to say, but if you are from India, SHOWER. Learn to speak clearly and slowly. I only say this because I have worked at several IT departments and several stereotypes have proven consistent. Have clean, understandable English and shower daily. If you already do, great. If not... consider it.

Back to the task at hand: utilize the career center from your university. Don't just look for Linux positions, look for database, networking, even Windows administration (avoid help desk/tier 1 support stuff, if you can). Get a foothold somewhere, and practice technologies like hosting a UEC cloud at your house, setting up automated installs, routing/firewalls, network monitoring tools, etc. Just being able to say you're familiar with these technologies shows your interest in the field, and shows you have skills.

P.S. Where in TX?

beercz
November 18th, 2009, 10:07 AM
Starting your own company is sometimes the best option out of all the options.
Which is exactly what I did. I became redundant at the end of April and after looking for work for about 4 weeks I set up my own company.
Keep going hellmet and good luck. Just don't give up! I'm sure something will come your way soon.

crucialhoax
November 18th, 2009, 10:24 AM
I feel your pain. I've been looking for a job for over a year. Put in over 60 applications. From the corner store to banking corps. Finally landed one at 2Wire. AT&T Call center. crappy hours, stringent rules and goals but whatever. I have been working in construction for 12 years then the economy went south, I needed to find a new avenue. Don't let yourself down, just have to push through until you get what you want. :)

[h2o]
November 18th, 2009, 10:32 AM
So if I were looking for a job and emigrating is not a problem then I'd try European countries ... Or (back to) India or China. A lot of (IT) work seem to be outsourced there anyway now, so maybe the West is not the best place to go job hunting right now.

scorp123
November 18th, 2009, 11:34 AM
;8340274']Or (back to) India or China. Well .. yeah. If someone is from that area anyway ... :)

Muppeteer
November 18th, 2009, 02:48 PM
I think this calls for a video...

They took our jobs! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brj2UkUPjCI)

Cuddles McKitten
November 18th, 2009, 03:30 PM
Steps to becoming a UNIX admin:

1 Refuse to wear anything but T-shirts with nerdy slogans that only one out of every five hundred understand
2. Gain 50+ pounds
3. Play a lot of nethack
4. Grow a full neckbeard
5. Make sure your glasses look similar to Drew Carey's

After that, people will know to hire you to UNIX admin jobs just by looking at you.

ExSuSEusr
November 18th, 2009, 03:43 PM
How do you all do your own thing? Are you successful at it? I ask because I've often thought about it too, then I realize there are 20438028948928949082389 people out there doing the SAME exact thing. Every where you turn there is someone doing "freelance" IT work targeting small to medium sized businesses that can't afford or really need a full time staff.

The same with building computers. In a market that seems like half the planet's population how the hell do you even start to compete? Not to mention with mass-production companies like Dell selling machines for 3 hundred bucks WITH a years worth of tech support and warranties.

squilookle
November 18th, 2009, 05:11 PM
Things are tough at the minute.

We have a local paper called the Evening Chronicle that is well known for advertising local jobs on a Thursday: 2 years ago they used to advertise "1, 500 jobs tonight" on the front of the paper. The lowest I've seen on there recently is 250: its a big drop.

Despite the difficulties, I'm sure you'll find something, just keep at it. :)

Good luck, mate.

t0p
November 18th, 2009, 05:33 PM
Years of reading BOFH (http://bofh.ntk.net/*******.html) made me want to be a sysadmin. But I did something else instead.

hellmet
November 18th, 2009, 06:01 PM
Well, the US of A aren't exactly in a good shape if you haven't noticed. They already have millions of jobless people of their own. I doubt they will easily give away any job to foreigners ...

I have friends who lost their "green card" status because their US employer had to fire them because of the bad economy and what not. No big deal. They simply returned back to Europe.

Which leads me to what I want to suggest: Why USA? Why not other continents? You seem to be from India ... so does it really matter to which foreign country you emigrate to? USA ... or UK, or Germany, or Switzerland ... wouldn't it all be the same to you?

You asked for job listings. Well. How about Switzerland then? Our climate sucks, yes. But crime rates are extremely low, public security and safety is extremely high, living standards are extremely high, and the pay for IT professionals is excellent. And it doesn't matter much that you speak none of the official local languages (German, French, Italian, Raeto-Romansh) -- when it comes to IT then English is perfectly accepted as additional inofficial "national" language.

All this Swiss job web sites are in English ... as English is not a local language it's obvious the web sites are indeed intended for foreigners interested to work here:

http://www.jobsingeneva.com/?sector=it
http://www.adecco.ch/home/index.asp?cl=e
http://www.swissjobjournal.com/
http://www.swisstalents.org/swissjobs/default.htm
http://www.manpower.ch/en/

Also a good starting point are the "usual suspects" (= the companies most likely to have a job for you):
- large banks
- large corporations who happen to be present here
- pharmaceutical companies (we got tons of those too)

So I'd also give these companies a look:

http://www.ubs.com/1/e/career_candidates/flash.html
https://www.credit-suisse.com/careers/en/
http://h10055.www1.hp.com/jobsathp/content/home/home.asp?Lang=DEde&area=CH
http://www.ibm.com/employment/ch/
http://www.sun.com/corp_emp/search.cgi?loc=CH


Google will find the rest for you. Fact is that English-speaking professionals with the right profile can get jobs here. I worked for Hewlett-Packard here in Switzerland for seven years (2000 - 2007) and I have worked with Americans, Brits, Canadians, Cubans, Ecuadorians, Columbians, French, Spaniards, Italians, Turks, Croatians, Serbs, Egyptians, Algerians, Tunesians, Albanians, Mexicans, Germans, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegians, Romanians, Pakistanis, Indians, Chinese, Japanese .... right here in Switzerland.

And while we're at it: Other European countries such as Germany most likely will also allow qualified foreigners to take jobs there. Germany has a very large industrial sector. They produce a lot more than just cars. And all those companies have IT departments too ... I know for fact that in Germany they "import" Indians for specific jobs ...

http://gecs.wordpress.com/2008/09/11/germany-in-need-of-skilled-indian-professionals/


Again ... this is not to flame the US of A ... But let's face it: US economy isn't exactly in a good shape. So if I were looking for a job and emigrating is not a problem then I'd try European countries ...

Just my 0.02 €
Excellent suggestion. Will start looking into avenues. I'm not sure if they'd sponsor VISAs and stuff.. May the research begin..

I don't care where I get a job, as long as it is not back in India. I really need to work for atleast 3 years in order to make enough to cover my investment in college, and to get enough to start on my own on getting back.


I know this sounds like a jerk thing to say, but if you are from India, SHOWER. Learn to speak clearly and slowly. I only say this because I have worked at several IT departments and several stereotypes have proven consistent. Have clean, understandable English and shower daily. If you already do, great. If not... consider it.
Haha.. I do shower often. My English is rated "A" in India. Here, I have had to change and mould my accent severely to make myself understood.
I notice some people don't make the effort of trying to understand.

scorp123
November 18th, 2009, 06:05 PM
Steps to becoming a UNIX admin:

1 Refuse to wear anything but T-shirts with nerdy slogans that only one out of every five hundred understand
2. Gain 50+ pounds
3. Play a lot of nethack
4. Grow a full neckbeard
5. Make sure your glasses look similar to Drew Carey's

After that, people will know to hire you to UNIX admin jobs just by looking at you. LOL ... we had guys like that try their luck. But as soon as you ask a simple question such as


What's your opinion on this line in this shell script and how would you optimize it?

...
awk -F':' '{ print FILENAME ":" $0 }' /data/*/passwd-data.out | grep 'x:'$PWDUID':' | tr "/" ":" | cut -d':' -f5,7,9,10 | awk -F':' '$2!~/'"$PWDUSER"'/ { print $0 }'
...



After such a question it's easy to tell who's basically clueless and just wearing a t-shirt and who indeed deserves to be admitted into the admin ranks .... :D

And yes ... I ask scary questions like that. Impostors better be prepared to be laughed sky-high out of the interview. :twisted:

The correct answer to above question BTW is this:


"What does this pile of sh*t code do??? This looks like you're keeping user passwords in a central place and you're trying to apply some modifications to them ... YUUUUCK!!! Why don't you use LDAP for this???"


Knowing shell programming isn't everything. The real pros know when they should NOT be programming something and instead use a different solution ;)
.
.
.
.

scorp123
November 18th, 2009, 07:48 PM
My English is rated "A" in India. Talking of Indian accents .... ;)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw6RgIf6epQ

(no insults intended here -- this is just humor, OK?)

emigrant
November 18th, 2009, 08:04 PM
I know this sounds like a jerk thing to say, but if you are from India, SHOWER. Learn to speak clearly and slowly. I only say this because I have worked at several IT departments and several stereotypes have proven consistent. Have clean, understandable English and shower daily. If you already do, great. If not... consider it.


you mean indians don't take enough showers? :p:p

hellmet
November 18th, 2009, 08:37 PM
Talking of Indian accents .... ;)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw6RgIf6epQ

(no insults intended here -- this is just humor, OK?)
:D Russel's good. Saw that before.

Ian dewhurst
November 18th, 2009, 09:34 PM
Its a shame you don't live in the UK there are surprisingly a numerous amount of jobs for linux admin work.

I saw a linux admin job advertised a few months ago for 1k a day only snag was the RHCE qualification which meant that job was not mine :(

Shpongle
November 18th, 2009, 10:22 PM
I think this calls for a video...

They took our jobs! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brj2UkUPjCI)

classic episode!!

Frak
November 18th, 2009, 10:26 PM
Cheater :D
If you ain't cheatin', you ain't competin'.

scorp123
November 18th, 2009, 10:49 PM
If you ain't cheatin', you ain't competin'. It's just that usually stammering is seen as disadvantage, especially for callcenter jobs.... ;)

suitedaces
November 18th, 2009, 10:59 PM
It's just that usually stammering is seen as disadvantage, especially for callcenter jobs.... ;)

And accounting jobs apparently. :(

Maheriano
November 18th, 2009, 11:01 PM
Try having your resume professionally redone. I paid Monster $300 to do mine, got a job within a week and it was in a salary range $5000 higher than usual. So I basically made my money back in 2 weeks.

Frak
November 18th, 2009, 11:10 PM
It's just that usually stammering is seen as disadvantage, especially for callcenter jobs.... ;)
I like in the US, a.k.a. "Don't discriminate against me or I will OWN YOU" of America.

ctyc
November 18th, 2009, 11:14 PM
Hang in there buddy, something will come up.

hkgonra
November 18th, 2009, 11:37 PM
I feel your pain. I got laid off work last week as a CNC Machinist and I been putting my resumes in all week. Also put one in for a Linux Admin / Network Technician. I will let you know if they call.. lol

If you are in North MS I hear about people looking for good CNC machinists in the Memphis area all the time.

scorp123
November 18th, 2009, 11:54 PM
I like in the US, a.k.a. "Don't discriminate against me or I will OWN YOU" of America. Yes, that's sometimes an advantage ...

Luke has no name
November 19th, 2009, 02:12 AM
Its a shame you don't live in the UK there are surprisingly a numerous amount of jobs for linux admin work.

I saw a linux admin job advertised a few months ago for 1k a day only snag was the RHCE qualification which meant that job was not mine :(

1k a week? Like 1,000 pounds per week? That's almost $85,000 / year, which is a nice sum for someone with 5-10 years experience. Explains the RHCE.

Icehuck
November 19th, 2009, 02:17 AM
I recommend using an IT recruiter to help you out. They usually have dozens and dozens of places they can contact.