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View Full Version : Anyone keen on 'Go'?



amitabhishek
November 11th, 2009, 07:34 AM
Google software luminaries such as Unix co-creator Ken Thompson believe that they can help boost both computing power and programmers' abilities with an experimental programming language project called Go.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-30685_3-10393210-264.html
http://golang.org/

Personally my info. on this one is next to zero.

Firestem4
November 11th, 2009, 07:39 AM
Damn! Beat me to it! lol. I'm just getting into programming so I doubt i'll pick it up, but this is pretty cool nonetheless.

Heres another good article from trusty Ars Technica
http://arstechnica.com/open-source/news/2009/11/go-new-open-source-programming-language-from-google.ars

amitabhishek
November 11th, 2009, 08:05 AM
WOW!!! An ARM port too...

hobo14
November 11th, 2009, 08:14 AM
Looks interesting.

gnomeuser
November 11th, 2009, 08:29 AM
wow an ugly syntax that is hard to read
wow, no exceptions
wow, no platform bindings or native platform with which to write actual useful programs.

Additionally there is no IDE support, I see no debugger.

The notable absence of exceptions would seem to make error handling messy to me, additionally it is merely a compiler and a language spec right now - the true test is if it can bare a whole platform (e.g. can we one day write what is essentially a GNOME application in Go and retain it's Go'ness or will the design prove to cumbersome and error prone).

So far unimpressed.

amitabhishek
November 11th, 2009, 08:48 AM
wow an ugly syntax that is hard to read

Cleaner than cpp IMO.


wow, no platform bindings or native platform with which to write actual useful programs.

It was unveiled yesterday.

handy
November 11th, 2009, 08:51 AM
Good golly, I thought the mod's had let a thread slip through that was asking about people's association with amphetamines.

Thankfully I was wrong. :)

CJ Master
November 11th, 2009, 09:01 AM
Cleaner than cpp IMO.

C++ looks like an absolutely terribly structured programing language that's confusing as heck and certainly not productive. I still have no idea why people use it instead of C.

Bodsda
November 11th, 2009, 09:17 AM
Cleaner than cpp IMO.

C++ structure is largely up to the programmer. I think C++ can be made to look extremely neat and clean but it can also be extremely messy if designed that way. It's all down to the programmer

3rdalbum
November 11th, 2009, 10:41 AM
Sounds too low-level and too much work for me. I'll just stick with Python.

hobo14
November 11th, 2009, 10:50 AM
wow an ugly syntax that is hard to read

A little unfair I think. It's different, that's all.



C++ looks like an absolutely terribly structured programing language that's confusing as heck and certainly not productive. I still have no idea why people use it instead of C.

Two different kettles of fish.

BTW, have a look here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obfuscated_code) for some C code beyond recognition. :p

gnomeuser
November 11th, 2009, 01:03 PM
Cleaner than cpp IMO.


Not a big cpp fan either, I was trained in intel x86 ASM and C++ and the syntax in both those took considerable amounts of time to read and understand. I would consider something like C# as being somewhat beautiful, one major advantage is that all the APIs in .NET are designed to be coherent and adhere to a set of design rules.



It was unveiled yesterday.

So? Before such things exist I would argue that it is of at best limited use. I don't see a plan to develop such an ecosystem so in effect Google created a new language which attempts to change some syntax and address the multicore problem by that old standard "rewrite your existing code entirely". Yippie

hobo14
November 11th, 2009, 01:32 PM
Not a big cpp fan either, I was trained in intel x86 ASM and C++ and the syntax in both those took considerable amounts of time to read and understand. I would consider something like C# as being somewhat beautiful, one major advantage is that all the APIs in .NET are designed to be coherent and adhere to a set of design rules.

The syntax of c++ and c# have only trivial differences....




So? Before such things exist I would argue that it is of at best limited use. I don't see a plan to develop such an ecosystem so in effect Google created a new language which attempts to change some syntax and address the multicore problem by that old standard "rewrite your existing code entirely". Yippie

But they did say (I think...in the article linked from slashdot?) that Google hopes to one day replace it's c++ usage with Go.
If that happens, you can be sure there will be a multitude of tools/IDE/plugins/etc beforehand.

mmix
November 11th, 2009, 02:24 PM
I don't like python.