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View Full Version : [ubuntu] which online backup site to use - a must read for backup fenatics like myself



mjp29
October 15th, 2009, 03:16 AM
I want some input on what the best online backup sites users here use are at a good cost (or no cost at all will work since Ubuntu is free and works great at no cost).

I am willing to pay for peace of mind if an online company is reputable and can provide good assurance that the online backup they provide is also backed up atleast once by them (so they should atleast be backing up the files I upload to them also to another HD or whatever one would think!).

Also, I'm willing to pay more if it is a reputable company that has a brand name that has been around a while (for a random example, say Kodak). But it doesn't have to be a recognized name if users here, that I trust more about computer stuff than any tech person I talk to, tell me what they use (either free or fee based) and is good.

Technial info: I am only really interested in backing up my MOST important data online which is my digital photos since the year 2000. I have accumulated 38.45 GB of photos neatly organized by year in folders named by year. I could care less how long it takes to upload this ~39 Gigs of photos as long as I know it's a good backup site I'm using.

Additional info: I'm making a transition from a very old mac running os x to Ubuntu. Even my backup HD drive on my Mac [which is a 40 gig backup fire wire drive] just recently could not back up all my photo files that are on my old Mac. I also burn backup DVD's calendered at every 3 months and my wife takes the DVD's to work to store them off site so if the house burns down the photos are in a different location (which is really a 2nd backup as original photos are on old mac, i back them up to 40gig HD hooked to Mac, and I backup same photos to DVD to be stored off-site [at wife's work away from house]. By the way, the 40 gig backup HD I have became full because there are a few files I'm still backing up on the HD from the Mac [like hundreds of old poems I wrote as a young man and so forth that aren't as important to me anymore as my photos but are still somewhat things i want to keep]

I think I've done a good job of backing up [how many times have you heard or read even hear that someone just had a crashed HD and now wants to learn how to backup] - one person once said here in the forums as a reply to someone not backing up in any way *so your HD crashed and you lost all your photos and now you want to ask about how you can backup*

I do believe that a trusted online backup (that backs up what I send them for sure please!) would do several things for me which is 1) backing up online would save me initial money to not buy a bigger external HD that is now full, 2) I could theoretically stop buying DVD's to backup to for my wife to take off-site [to her work] because the online backup would be off-site [not in my home if my home burned down], 3) i wouldn't have to create a local network through my router from my ubuntu box to my mac or connect any cords to get my most important files to my ubuntu box as i could do it all online [will take longer but i have time baby], 4) i could use several (say a couple or more) online backup places [maybe use one reputable paid site and use one free site or 2 free sites] and this all increases my peace of mind that with each additional online backup site I'm using they are also backing up my data which is like saying in math i'm backing up exponentially with each additional online backup site i use (i'll probably just use 2 but 3 sounds tasty to a backup fenatic like myself).

I think this (and hope this) has been interesting reading for backup fenatics like myself and everyone keep in mind I need around 40 gigs of online backup space NOW.

Thanks and all backup fenatics please reply.

I hope this has been interesting reading [and questions

webcrawler03
October 15th, 2009, 03:39 AM
Take a look at adrive (http://www.adrive.com (http://www.adrive.com/)). They offer 50gb of free back up space that is browser accessible. I think you can pay for an account on there also and receive a desktop client and additional space but dont quote me on that part. To be honest it sounds to me as if you are taking the safest route possible though by putting everything to DVD or CD and storing it elsewhere. Maybe try a safety deposit box also?? Remember also that the more copys of your personal materials you have out there the more likely it is for them to be seen by others, make sure you are keeping passwords, account numbers, and the such away from any storage device you may choose.

mjp29
October 15th, 2009, 04:41 AM
Take a look at adrive (http://www.adrive.com (http://www.adrive.com/)). They offer 50gb of free back up space that is browser accessible. I think you can pay for an account on there also and receive a desktop client and additional space but dont quote me on that part. To be honest it sounds to me as if you are taking the safest route possible though by putting everything to DVD or CD and storing it elsewhere. Maybe try a safety deposit box also?? Remember also that the more copys of your personal materials you have out there the more likely it is for them to be seen by others, make sure you are keeping passwords, account numbers, and the such away from any storage device you may choose.

Thank you so much for your prompt reply in the forum here. I am going to go to the adrive.com site annd upload files now [after all 50gb and less is free so it's a no brainer to me in the present although I objectively don't discounty any future repliers here that recommend other free sites under 50gb after all backing up to free to all the sites under 50gb for free only exponentially increases backing up as each of the free sites should be backing things up also - just makes sense).

I do appreciate your additional comments about safety security boxes as I do believe the small files of my personal poetry I scribed many years ago are personal because poetry is often more personal information than other written text as a person that wrote books once told me he doesn't publish poetry as poetry tends to lean itself to offering up more personal info [for lack of a better word] than other literature [which doesn't usually include info about yourself that hints to who you were/are in love with the time or want to do at the time, etc...]

Your other comment lends true too, as the more copies of ones personal info. out there means more copies others can perhaps access. But for me, my primary concern is to backup photos [and backup around 200 personal poems where I did write about things like being intrigued about the opposite sex] but in my mind I, at my age, I could care less about anyone reading my poetry and not be upset or have others read it and not be all that upset [at my age of close to 40 years old now] if others read them or even if they were lost by non-backup.

My primary concern is not losing the photos. I really don't care who sees them. If I backup my poetry to these sites perhaps I should worry that someone would read them and publish them [but at my age the poetry is insignificant]. But the important files are such (photos of both my children now 2 and 4 since birth) that I am extremely concerned about backing them up and don't care who sees them. The poetry is nothing to me at this point in time compared to the importance of my photos.

But I can understand, from what you said, that others on this forum want to backup sensitive information that others can see and read and the more they back it up the more it may be seen and read and shared. But not in my case really.

Sef
October 15th, 2009, 04:49 AM
To be honest it sounds to me as if you are taking the safest route possible though by putting everything to DVD or CD and storing it elsewhere.

An online back up is the safest way to back up. DVDs/CDs often do not last more than 3-5 years before becoming unusable.

niteshifter
October 15th, 2009, 05:18 AM
Take a look at adrive (http://www.adrive.com (http://www.adrive.com/)). They offer 50gb of free back up space that is browser accessible. I think you can pay for an account on there also and receive a desktop client and additional space but dont quote me on that part. ...

TANSTAFL
From adrive.com Terms of Service (http://www.adrive.com/terms):

7. Maintenance of Storage Data. Adrive shall have no responsibility for and does not guarantee the integrity, completeness or availability of Storage Data residing on Adrive's equipment. You are responsible for independent backup of Storage Data stored using Adrive's services. You agree to assume all risk of loss of such data. You agree to defend, indemnify and hold Adrive harmless for any loss of data, whether on Your equipment or through Adrive's services, arising out of or resulting from use of Adrive's services, including use of software provided by Adrive, if any. Adrive may, but shall not be required to, delete Your Storage Data after the termination of this Agreement.

In short, using them (or many other free / low cost "backup service") gets you a warm fuzzy feeling, a bit of convenience and nothing else. Real, commercial high-reliability services don't disclaim all responsibility. They put something "precious" (money) on the line, same as you. You will, of course pay handsomely for the service, running a four 9's or better service isn't cheap.

What I'm saying here is be informed. Use an economical online service for the ease of access (I do via a VPS) but depend on physical media - stored in two different places - to hold crucial backup data. Set a schedule and stick to it for trading out "containers" (be that hard drive, tape or optical) regularly. And remember this rule: "An unverified archive is not an archive". Test your backup means after using it, every use.

mocoloco
October 15th, 2009, 05:32 AM
I've liked Spideroak (https://spideroak.com/) for being easy to use and select what to back up, I've been using their 2GB free account, their pricing is $10/m for 100GB.
Mozy (http://mozy.com/) is supposed to be releasing a Linux client but who knows when.
Lately I'm leaning toward using Amazon S3 (http://aws.amazon.com/s3/). I've heard good things about JungleDisk (https://www.jungledisk.com/), which is just a nice frontend to connect to S3, but they charge you another $2 a month on top of the S3 storage costs.
I'm now playing with an app called Deja-Dup (https://launchpad.net/deja-dup) (install via apt (apt:deja-dup)) that seems to be a good option to use with S3 that won't cost me more.
Still want to look at Memopal (http://www.memopal.com/en/default.aspx), the pricing looks good at $49/year for 150GB.

Then there are the services that primarily look to provide file syncing but can also be used for storage. With a Linux client there's Dropbox (https://www.getdropbox.com/) (I use this one, great app on all platforms), ZumoDrive (http://www.zumodrive.com/), MyOtherDrive (http://www.myotherdrive.com/) (uses a java webstart app), and of course UbuntuOne (https://one.ubuntu.com/).

As you can tell I've also been looking for a good backup solution and haven't settled on one just yet.

mjp29
October 17th, 2009, 01:43 PM
Take a look at adrive (http://www.adrive.com (http://www.adrive.com/)). They offer 50gb of free back up space that is browser accessible. I think you can pay for an account on there also and receive a desktop client and additional space but dont quote me on that part. To be honest it sounds to me as if you are taking the safest route possible though by putting everything to DVD or CD and storing it elsewhere. Maybe try a safety deposit box also?? Remember also that the more copys of your personal materials you have out there the more likely it is for them to be seen by others, make sure you are keeping passwords, account numbers, and the such away from any storage device you may choose.

I tried to use adrive.com however both on Ubuntu box and Mac OS X box it said it needed Java and I made sure both had it.

So I went to Carbonite.com which has unlimited storage for about $6/month. I would not like my old Mac which is os x but not an intel based mac [it is PowerPC-chip by motorolla]. Carbonite website specifically said ONLY intel based Mac's can backup at carbonite.

I would like to use a site (and pay for it around $6/month) that allows unlimited backup, because with unlimited backup I can make movies with my digital camera and don't have to worry about the size of these movies filling up backup space. I also want to pay for a site that is reputable in that it doesn't have a policy that states if THEY lose my data then it's not their fault and they are not liable.

LewRockwell
October 17th, 2009, 03:46 PM
An online back up is the safest way to back up. DVDs/CDs often do not last more than 3-5 years before becoming unusable.

Ummm...which disks are you using where you are seeing this failure timetable?

To wit:

Good Information On Optical Media Selection And Preservation

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optical_media_preservation

http://hurstassociates.blogspot.com/2007/07/osta-and-ecma-believe-optical-discdvd.html

http://it.med.miami.edu/x980.xml

as always, your mileage may vary

.

mjp29
October 18th, 2009, 11:12 AM
An online back up is the safest way to back up. DVDs/CDs often do not last more than 3-5 years before becoming unusable.

I actually had that idea in mind when I was thinking of online backup. I have read, a year or so ago, that people have a false sense of security in saving any data to either cd or DVD. From what I read, and from memory, I believe the data may be wrote on a cd or DVD by a laser that changes the ink within the surface of the cd/dvd. This ink is particularly destroyable by light. If one does backup to cd/dvd, they should definitely store the cd/dvd in a dark place (which is in a dark box) to decrease any light (uv or other frequencies of light), to keep light away from the disks because light is destructible to the ink. I have also read about lost data on cd/dvd after 3 to 5 years of storage. It seems I even read that these cd/dvd disks may have a maximum life of around 15-20 years or so.

Also, one is better off actually using a non-digital camera (use a film camera, they still make them and still make film) and using a photo lab that prints good quality pictures (like on Kodak photo paper that is highly durable, waterproof and last a lifetime). Or one could use a digital camera and use a photo lab (upload photos online) or use high quality photo paper at home to actually get pictures on paper and store the paper as a backup.

All of what I've said is from memory, and I believe that most people in the general public do not know that a cd/dvd disks is really a very unreliable medium to backup important things like family photos. Most people just think a cd/dvd is indestructable or something if stored in a plastic case to protect it from scratches. Not true and we all need to be educated more about this.

All I've said here is from memory, but I'm sure if someone had the time they could link us to a good article on the net that may say the same thing.

mjp29
October 18th, 2009, 11:16 AM
Ummm...which disks are you using where you are seeing this failure timetable?

To wit:

Good Information On Optical Media Selection And Preservation

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optical_media_preservation

http://hurstassociates.blogspot.com/2007/07/osta-and-ecma-believe-optical-discdvd.html

http://it.med.miami.edu/x980.xml

as always, your mileage may vary

.


In one of your links (wikipedia), it says to make sure you use a cd/dvd disk that has a long life dye (ink).

Curious question: Are these high quality disks sold commonly? I dunno but would like to know if people can pay more and get the high quality disks, say at Walmart or Best Buy or somewhere or do they have to be special ordered on the net.

coldReactive
October 18th, 2009, 11:28 AM
An online back up is the safest way to back up. DVDs/CDs often do not last more than 3-5 years before becoming unusable.

Problem is, I back up copyrighted material (such as soundtracks), so I use USB for all that, but like CD/DVDs, they will wear out too. But storing copyrighted material on a backup server... ....

alienclone
October 18th, 2009, 11:40 AM
i have ADrive.com like others suggested. but i also have a humyo.com account, they give you 20gb space for media (movies, pics, music) which you can choose certian folders to be public and streamable(very nice feature), and 5gb for other files for free.(but you have to log into the account like every 90 days to keep your account active or they delete it along with your files, but they give email warnings ahead of time)

ikt
October 18th, 2009, 11:43 AM
With a Linux client there's Dropbox (https://www.getdropbox.com/) (I use this one, great app on all platforms)

Dropbox is the backup site I use, I find it works well and the linux client is excellent.

benj1
October 18th, 2009, 12:12 PM
backblaze (http://www.backblaze.com/)
never used it but its worth mentioning as its completely open source,runs on debian, theres even instructions on how to build their servers (http://blog.backblaze.com/2009/09/01/petabytes-on-a-budget-how-to-build-cheap-cloud-storage/)

there doesn't seem to be a linux client at the moment, but one to watch