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View Full Version : Gene Roddenberry Mac 128



harlan
September 19th, 2009, 11:40 AM
Anyone interested in buying the Star Trek creator computer?
It will go on auction next month.

http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2009/09/first-apple-macintosh-plus/

CharmyBee
September 19th, 2009, 12:42 PM
Just use the keyboard.

jrothwell97
September 19th, 2009, 12:56 PM
*picks up mouse* Hello, computer!

speedwell68
September 19th, 2009, 08:48 PM
Just use the keyboard.

"The keyboard, how quaint".:D

MikeTheC
September 19th, 2009, 08:57 PM
I briefly owned a Mac 128 (for nostalgia reasons) and I loved the old 400K floppy drives they used (both internal and external) because they were wonderfully melodic during disk access activities.

My first Macintosh was a Mac Plus that I got as a birthday present in 1986. I kept it for four years and sold it to help pay for a Mac II (which by then had already been outdated and replaced twice in the same form factor and had been succeeded by at least two others of different form factors).

That really brings back some great memories, though.

MikeTheC
September 19th, 2009, 09:13 PM
Also, if you look at that photo, you'll see the so-called "Programmers Interrupt" switch installed on the side of the case. There was no way to restart a Mac in the event of a system crash if you did not have that installed (it simply snapped into place).

There are two switches on there. One of them is the Programmer's Interrupt (which brings you to a terminal-esq dialog box that you can type in commands and look at the current memory contents) which was known as "Macsbug" and the other is a reset button.

And here's a little bit of trivia for you folks (as if this post and the prior one weren't already full of trivia)...

Until around MacOS 4, there was no such thing as multi-tasking on a Mac, apart from pulling up and running the various different "desk accessories" such as calculator, puzzle, etc. Therefore, when you opened a program, the file manager system (a.k.a. "the Finder") quit and the program you opened loaded. Even then, most Mac users didn't seriously use any form of multitasking until Mac OS 7, as Apple didn't have a particularly good memory management system in place until then.

Therefore, when a program crashed, the only thing running "in the background" was the kernel and base level OS. Consequentially, you couldn't really recover from the state (as such).

However, if you had your Programmer's Switch installed, you could summon Macsbug and type in the following to force a re-load of the Finder and avoid having to either reboot or cycle power to effect a reboot:

SM FA700 A9F4 [RETURN]
PC FA700 [RETURN]
G [RETURN]
It worked well, but generally you wanted to restart anyhow as memory fragmentation was a real issue.

tubezninja
September 19th, 2009, 09:33 PM
Therefore, when a program crashed, the only thing running "in the background" was the kernel and base level OS. Consequentially, you couldn't really recover from the state (as such).


Which, lacking a programmers key, landed you here:

http://developer.apple.com/DOCUMENTATION/mac/OSUtilities/graphics/ERR-S-03.jpg

Thankfully, no one ever sees the Bomb anymore these days. But sometimes it's fondly missed. Me? I'll be happy if I never use pre-OS X macs ever again. :)

MikeTheC
September 19th, 2009, 09:34 PM
Which, lacking a programmers key, landed you here:

http://developer.apple.com/DOCUMENTATION/mac/OSUtilities/graphics/ERR-S-03.jpg

Yup. Pretty much.