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scottie1941
September 16th, 2009, 05:36 AM
Am I permited to say on this Forum that I am currently running Windows Xp. Well let get into it. Firstly I'm an old timer, so any responses to my enquiry, I hope you keep this in mind. Secondly, I have only been operating a computer for a short time. I intend to build myself another computer using PCLinuxOS 2009. In choosing my RAM, Corsair suggests using a 64bit OS. Is this new PCLinuxOS 2009 64bit or what is the bit rate?? :confused:

lisati
September 16th, 2009, 05:39 AM
Although I've looked at PCLinuxOS I've never used it.

Since this is an Ubuntu support forum, I'll ask the "obvious": have you looked into useing Ubuntu? You can get a copy here: http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu

running_rabbit07
September 16th, 2009, 05:47 AM
Yes the 64-Bit terminology just stands for being compatible with 64-bit processors. I have never seen PCLinuxOS, but I can tell you that if and when you install Ubuntu, we will help you out here on the forums. Which ever OS you decide on, I wish you the best of luck. Remeber that patience is a key when learning a new operting system.

P.S. If anyone lashes out because you are using Windows XP, just ignore them.

cariboo
September 16th, 2009, 06:59 AM
If anyone gives you a hard time about using XP, report the post.

ankspo71
September 16th, 2009, 07:00 AM
Hi,

As far as PCLinuxOS having a 64 bit version, I don't know. I had a look over at the PCLinuxOS homepage, as well as the PCLinuxOS Gnome homepage, and I wasn't able to see any info about that.

If you haven't tried PCLinuxOS yet, to me it is like having a Linux that is a cross between Mandriva and Ubuntu.
James.

3rdalbum
September 16th, 2009, 07:05 AM
You can use your RAM on a 32-bit operating system, that is no problems at all.

Corsair, and other RAM manufacturers, have been having a bit of problem with people buying 4 GiB of RAM and then complaining that their (32-bit) operating system can only see 3.3 GiB of it. A 32-bit operating system can only see (up to) 4 GiB of RAM, whereas a 64-bit OS can see all the RAM you can put into your computer.

That's why Corsair "recommends" a 64-bit operating system.

Geoff918
September 16th, 2009, 07:22 AM
Actually, I read about PCLinuxOS on their website, and also on distrowatch. They do not have a 64-bit release, nor do they intend to release a 64-bit version. (I'm sure they will at some point, but this is nowhere near the radar right now).

As far as the 64-bit thing goes, there are a couple issues. Running XP, you may not have a 64-bit processor setup (though rare, 64-bit XP is out there). It sounds like you perhaps breach the 3 GB RAM threshold in which case, a 32-bit OS will not recognize that much RAM. (Don't ask me what it will do, whether it causes addressing issues, or merely ignores the extra RAM).

As someone new to Linux and computers you may wish to stick with Ubuntu based on the rich user base and great documentation available online. openSUSE apparently has the best printed documentation, I've heard from many sources but I've never personally read it. I learned how to use openSUSE myself and it was pretty easy, I must say. But, if you need help on a forum you're most likely going to hear in response to the question "How do I fix [X]?" and the response will be "Just rebuild from source" or maybe even "Well, you just fix it." (Trust me, I've had these interactions before).

A fully free open source distro is gNewSense if you're looking for something of the like. Basically, Ubuntu is built off of Debian (probably the oldest surviving Linux distro) many other distros are built off Ubuntu. So it's a question of how far downstream you want to be. Do you want Mint? A green version of Ubuntu. GEU (GNOME / Enlightenment / Ubuntu) which the Ubuntu project requested they no longer use the Ubuntu name--such that they're now GEU. Of course, then there are the SUSE-esque / Red Hat distros such as Fedora and yes, even openSUSE.

I think most of this boils down to personal preference and usage. I personally like the Ubuntu philosophy. I like being an active member in the community. It's tremendously usable, and unlike some other builds such as Knoppix, etc. it doesn't break as easily. With Linux there are all of these "dependencies" and a poorly maintained catalogue of such can really cause havoc. I hate trying to update / upgrade anything on Knoppix. It almost certainly breaks several things in the system. The Ubuntu system is the most stable in this regards that I've found. openSUSE is very quick to release new kernel updates and updated software, but no guarantees that when you click the update button in Yast2 that it's not going to render some of your software or hardware useless forcing you to downgrade and fix the dependencies.

Anyway, that's probably a whole lot more than my two cents. I'm here with Ubuntu for a reason, I suppose. I do like to play with other distros for fun. But, this is what I use mainly. I have four computers running Ubuntu. One also has openSUSE 11.1 on it. I've tried Fedora and found it very boring / very lacking / unexciting, and with poor hardware support. The hardware support on openSUSE is phenomenal, but Ubuntu has really caught up with the most recent kernel integrations. I'm curious about gNewSense, but quite frankly, I'm running Ubuntu 9.10 on one of my systems and it's gorgeous. I love it already!

Paqman
September 16th, 2009, 08:14 AM
In choosing my RAM, Corsair suggests using a 64bit OS.

The only reason you'd need to follow this advice is if you were trying to include more than 3GB of RAM.

To be honest, neither XP nor any version of Linux will require that much, unless you're doing something specific that chews up a lot of RAM (eg: video editing, Computer-aided design, running virtual machines, etc)

If you're just using it for general computing, 2-3GB is heaps. Most flavours of Linux will run perfectly well on 1GB.

scottie1941
September 17th, 2009, 03:08 AM
Thanks for your much appreciated opinion. Yes, I am into video editing, either from old VHS (analog files) or from Digital files.

scottie1941
September 17th, 2009, 03:17 AM
Actually, I read about PCLinuxOS on their website, and also on distrowatch. They do not have a 64-bit release, nor do they intend to release a 64-bit version. (I'm sure they will at some point, but this is nowhere near the radar right now).

As far as the 64-bit thing goes, there are a couple issues. Running XP, you may not have a 64-bit processor setup (though rare, 64-bit XP is out there). It sounds like you perhaps breach the 3 GB RAM threshold in which case, a 32-bit OS will not recognize that much RAM. (Don't ask me what it will do, whether it causes addressing issues, or merely ignores the extra RAM).

As someone new to Linux and computers you may wish to stick with Ubuntu based on the rich user base and great documentation available online. openSUSE apparently has the best printed documentation, I've heard from many sources but I've never personally read it. I learned how to use openSUSE myself and it was pretty easy, I must say. But, if you need help on a forum you're most likely going to hear in response to the question "How do I fix [X]?" and the response will be "Just rebuild from source" or maybe even "Well, you just fix it." (Trust me, I've had these interactions before).

A fully free open source distro is gNewSense if you're looking for something of the like. Basically, Ubuntu is built off of Debian (probably the oldest surviving Linux distro) many other distros are built off Ubuntu. So it's a question of how far downstream you want to be. Do you want Mint? A green version of Ubuntu. GEU (GNOME / Enlightenment / Ubuntu) which the Ubuntu project requested they no longer use the Ubuntu name--such that they're now GEU. Of course, then there are the SUSE-esque / Red Hat distros such as Fedora and yes, even openSUSE.

I think most of this boils down to personal preference and usage. I personally like the Ubuntu philosophy. I like being an active member in the community. It's tremendously usable, and unlike some other builds such as Knoppix, etc. it doesn't break as easily. With Linux there are all of these "dependencies" and a poorly maintained catalogue of such can really cause havoc. I hate trying to update / upgrade anything on Knoppix. It almost certainly breaks several things in the system. The Ubuntu system is the most stable in this regards that I've found. openSUSE is very quick to release new kernel updates and updated software, but no guarantees that when you click the update button in Yast2 that it's not going to render some of your software or hardware useless forcing you to downgrade and fix the dependencies.

Anyway, that's probably a whole lot more than my two cents. I'm here with Ubuntu for a reason, I suppose. I do like to play with other distros for fun. But, this is what I use mainly. I have four computers running Ubuntu. One also has openSUSE 11.1 on it. I've tried Fedora and found it very boring / very lacking / unexciting, and with poor hardware support. The hardware support on openSUSE is phenomenal, but Ubuntu has really caught up with the most recent kernel integrations. I'm curious about gNewSense, but quite frankly, I'm running Ubuntu 9.10 on one of my systems and it's gorgeous. I love it already!


Thanks heaps for your much appreciated advise. You obviously spent a good bit of your time in composing your advise. Greatly appreciated.
Cheers......scottie1941

scottie1941
September 17th, 2009, 03:23 AM
Although I've looked at PCLinuxOS I've never used it.

Since this is an Ubuntu support forum, I'll ask the "obvious": have you looked into useing Ubuntu? You can get a copy here: http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu

Thanks for your reply. I will download Ubunta os shortly. What are your thoughts on PCLinuxOS 2009? See much difference with it and Ubunta?
Take Care mate!...........scottie1941

scottie1941
September 17th, 2009, 03:44 AM
Thanks for your reply. I will download Ubunta os shortly. What are your thoughts on PCLinuxOS 2009? See much difference with it and Ubunta?
Take Care mate!...........scottie1941

Thanks for your reply. I will download Ubunta os shortly. What are your thoughts on PCLinuxOS 2009? See much difference with it and Ubunta?
Take Care mate!...........scottie1941

SunnyRabbiera
September 17th, 2009, 03:49 AM
Pclinux is mainly intended for intel 32bit type systems, but it should work fairly well.

scottie1941
September 17th, 2009, 03:50 AM
Yes the 64-Bit terminology just stands for being compatible with 64-bit processors. I have never seen PCLinuxOS, but I can tell you that if and when you install Ubuntu, we will help you out here on the forums. Which ever OS you decide on, I wish you the best of luck. Remeber that patience is a key when learning a new operting system.

P.S. If anyone lashes out because you are using Windows XP, just ignore them.

I am in the process of downloading abunta. It seems to be a stable os. As for anyone rubbishing me re using xp. Perhaps they can't afford it!!
Thanks for your help.
Cheers..........scottie1941

scottie1941
September 17th, 2009, 03:52 AM
Pclinux is mainly intended for intel 32bit type systems, but it should work fairly well.


Thanks for your response.....Cheers......scottie1941

egalvan
September 17th, 2009, 03:55 AM
A 32-bit operating system can only see (up to) 4 GiB of RAM

Honestly, that's a Microsoft Windows Thing...

32-bit *nixes have been accessing more than 4GB of RAM for quite a spell.

True, you need to make sure the hardware has good PAE support, but that is common, except in very cheap mobo's.
Or you need 64-bit hardware.
And you need to have a PAE-enable kernel, but that is also common.

32-bit Ubuntu Hardy Server Edition came with PAE enabled.
I installed Hardy Server on a 64bit Dell, with 8GB of RAM.
Installed Gnome & KDE desktops.
All was seen and accessed, in a GUI environment.

Did I need 8GB of RAM?
Nope, but at $64 for four sticks of high-quality DDR2, how could I refuse? :)


So when you hear folks say "32bit OS's cannot access more than 4GB",
remember that Linux has "been there, done that".

egalvan
September 17th, 2009, 04:20 AM
As for which distibutiton to use...

Well, that is one of the biggest beauties of Linux...

Try one, try two, try them all...

If you don't have the time or bandwidth to download, then try buying the CD's from

www.OSDisc.com

I've used them, they are cheap...
and they ship fast.

3rdalbum
September 17th, 2009, 04:39 AM
Honestly, that's a Microsoft Windows Thing...

32-bit *nixes have been accessing more than 4GB of RAM for quite a spell.

Enterprise versions of Windows can do PAE as well to get more than 4GiB of address space on 32-bit.

egalvan
September 17th, 2009, 05:27 AM
Enterpri$e ver$ion$ of Window$ can do PAE as well to get more than 4GiB of address space on 32-bit.

And the free versions of Linux have been able to do this for years.

No need for expensive, obscure versions.

Which is my point... :)

running_rabbit07
September 17th, 2009, 05:58 AM
I have yet to figure out why this thread is bashing Windows? Quite a few people in this community are geeks like I am and get Windows for free through MSDN.

If you don't like something, it does not mean you have to bash it whenever you see it.