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MelDJ
September 14th, 2009, 02:44 PM
hi there. i am still a student but i am interested in going into the computer line. can anyone tell me what a computer scientist and a computer programmer do? where can i work if i go into either jobs? and do i have to learn programming for both jobs? if so, what language is best (i heard python is good for beginners)?
thanks in advance guys:lolflag:

Bachstelze
September 14th, 2009, 02:49 PM
A computer scientist mostly studies the theoretical side of computer science: algorithms, computability, complexity, etc.. While knowing how to actually program is not required in theory, it surely helps to know what you're talking about. ;)

A programmer... programs. ;) Depending on your actual job, you might also be involved in designing applications, and not only in programming them. Of course, knowing how to code (and to code well is important here. Python is indeed an excellent first language.

MelDJ
September 14th, 2009, 02:59 PM
A computer scientist mostly studies the theoretical side of computer science: algorithms, computability, complexity, etc.. While knowing how to actually program is not required in theory, it surely helps to know what you're talking about. ;)

A programmer... programs. ;) Depending on your actual job, you might also be involved in designing applications, and not only in programming them. Of course, knowing how to code (and to code well is important here. Python is indeed an excellent first language.

does that means a computer scientist does the R&D part of computing while a computer programmer just makes programs?
i got a head start though...just going through C++ tutorials...and making 'hello world':lolflag:
are the courses very tough? and can i use linux through the courses or is windoze a must? will my knowledge of linux be useful?

sorry if i seem to be asking too much. but i really want to know..living in a rural area means i cant get much info

Bachstelze
September 14th, 2009, 03:02 PM
does that means a computer scientist does the R&D part of computing while a computer programmer just makes programs?

In a way. You could also say that CS is to programming what maths are to physics.


are the courses very tough? and can i use linux through the courses or is windoze a must? will my knowledge of linux be useful?

It depends on where you study. Look for places around your area where they teach CS, and send them an email to ask.

MelDJ
September 26th, 2009, 07:31 AM
which is more profitable? and where does one work for either job?

Nepherte
September 26th, 2009, 11:25 AM
I'd say the computer scientist in general earns more, but I'd make sure you make sure you actually like the thing you study instead of looking at money. Both jobs pay well enough.

You will find both proficiencies in the same kind of companies, but in addition computer scientist can be found in the academic and r&d world as well.

MelDJ
September 26th, 2009, 12:34 PM
the money is just extra:popcorn:. I love using and repairing computers.
Is it true that the Massachutes (sorry if i spelled that wrong) Institute of Technology is the best place to study computer related courses? if not, where?

Nepherte
September 26th, 2009, 04:09 PM
Perhaps it's time to clear up some misconceptions: computer science has nothing to do with repairing computers.

nisshh
September 26th, 2009, 04:15 PM
I repair ALOT of computers BUT im NOT a computer scientist, im a programmer.

I recommend you start with programming python if you want to get somewhere.

MelDJ
September 27th, 2009, 03:28 AM
thanks for the replies everyone. really helped me understand more. at least now i know something about it:KS
PS: i still don't get what's the difference between C, python and the other languages. sorry if i seemed a bit stupid in the thread but i really want to know more about this and thought that everyone could help

lisati
September 27th, 2009, 03:40 AM
I speak as a (current) user who used to work as a programmer whose main work seemed to be report programs: you don't have to know all the theoretical stuff to write good programs, but it can sometimes help.