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greenstar
September 12th, 2009, 06:05 AM
What is the funniest command you've actually used?

Backstory:
I was sitting at my laptop burning off to DVD some files I recovered for a client today. I'm dealing with a couple of issues in the process.


Files with names that are not Joliet compliant for burning to disc; either too long (more than 65 chars.) or with illegal characters.
Multiple directories with large numbers of files that needed to be split up to be able to fit on 4.7 GB DVDs. I toyed with making a big archive, split at 4.2 GB. That wasn't really practical, and isn't exactly easy for a computer novice to use. I also tried a package called tarlimit from sourceforge, after reading about it in the forum archives. Thanks to strider1551 (http://ubuntuforums.org/member.php?u=90870) here on the forums for tarlimit. Tarlimit allowed me to create a set of archives at 4.2 GB each automatically separating the files to fit. This divided files from a single sub-directory over two discs. Once again, not exactly novice friendly for my client. tarlimit was excellent at optimizing space usage on the DVDs, but not exactly what I needed. I finally decided to just manually separate the directories in an easy to find and navigate manner.

So, I got the 2nd issue handled, but that 1st one is a pain. So I was digging in Synaptic and found a package called detox. So I'm checking it out, first running:

detox -hand then, the logical next command for learning to use detox:

man detox:D

I started laughing as soon as the text hit the screen and I thought about the words I had typed.

So there it is: man detox. Let's hear your funniest command.

steveneddy
September 12th, 2009, 06:30 AM
cowsay

as in


cowsay steveneddy is kewl

Don't have cowsay?


sudo apt-get install cowsay

greenstar
September 12th, 2009, 06:56 AM
cowsayas in


cowsay steveneddy is kewlDon't have cowsay?


sudo apt-get install cowsay

That's cool. I've seen that cow before. Now I have my very own.


cowsay greenstar is a weisenheimer

mcduck
September 12th, 2009, 08:20 AM
glxgears --iacknowledgethatthistoolisnotabenchmark

I don't think I'll ever be able to forget that parameter. Its absolutely genious. :)

(For the background, Glxgears used to require you to add that parameter to show the frames/second reading. I suppose the authors of the program really wanted people to understand that it shouldn't be used as a benchmark.. ;))

Gen2ly
September 12th, 2009, 10:05 AM
fsck /dev/partition

Think that someone may see me typing this and throwing out an expletive.

conehead77
September 12th, 2009, 11:43 AM
locate skynet

schauerlich
September 12th, 2009, 11:46 AM
Redacted - in bad taste

TheLions
September 12th, 2009, 12:53 PM
locate skynet

:lolflag:

dragos240
September 12th, 2009, 12:59 PM
Yes is my favorite command.

greenstar
September 12th, 2009, 07:09 PM
Yes is my favorite command.

At risk of sounding a bit dense, do you care to explain that one?

RiceMonster
September 12th, 2009, 07:15 PM
At risk of sounding a bit dense, do you care to explain that one?

type yes followed by a string of words into a terminal, and it will repeatedly print them until you kill it. For example,


yes RiceMonster

Or, you can just type yes and it will print y repeatadly.

Tibuda
September 12th, 2009, 07:15 PM
At risk of sounding a bit dense, do you care to explain that one?


$ yes is my favorite command.
is my favorite command.
is my favorite command.
is my favorite command.
is my favorite command.
is my favorite command.
is my favorite command.
is my favorite command.
is my favorite command.
is my favorite command.^C


yes - output a string repeatedly until killed

wojox
September 12th, 2009, 07:17 PM
wojox@wojox0:~$ %blow
bash: fg: %blow: no such job

subdivision
September 12th, 2009, 07:17 PM
I giggle at fsck.

K.L.
September 12th, 2009, 07:23 PM
Maybe this one?


apt-get moo

RiceMonster
September 12th, 2009, 07:25 PM
Maybe this one?


apt-get moo


cowsay cowsay is better

K.L.
September 12th, 2009, 07:33 PM
Okay, how about this one. Hit ALT+F2 and type "free the fish" :D AFAIK, it works only with GNOME.

It's not a command, more like an app, but still... :D

juancarlospaco
September 12th, 2009, 07:42 PM
If the GEGL can be executed by command i said the GEGL
:)

mcduck
September 12th, 2009, 07:45 PM
Okay, how about this one. Hit ALT+F2 and type "free the fish" :D AFAIK, it works only with GNOME.

It's not a command, more like an app, but still... :D

Since you mentioned that one, try typing "Require Quarter" as user name in the GDM login screen.. ;)

What comes to "yes", I actually find "false" a lot funnier. Not because running it would be fun, but because of what it does: "false - do nothing, unsuccessfully". ;)

darsu
September 12th, 2009, 08:28 PM
kdontchangethehostname.

I don't know what it's for. I tried it once just to see whether it really doesn't do what it promises to not do.

Barrucadu
September 12th, 2009, 08:32 PM
man which

K.L.
September 12th, 2009, 09:47 PM
Since you mentioned that one, try typing "Require Quarter" as user name in the GDM login screen.. ;)

I am using KDE right now, but I'll try this one for sure (some time later) :D

donkyhotay
September 12th, 2009, 10:42 PM
From a Tshirt somewhere...


man woman
segmentation fault (core dumped)

aaaantoine
September 12th, 2009, 11:50 PM
Since you mentioned that one, try typing "Require Quarter" as user name in the GDM login screen.. ;)

What comes to "yes", I actually find "false" a lot funnier. Not because running it would be fun, but because of what it does: "false - do nothing, unsuccessfully". ;)

Its counterpart is "true - do nothing, successfully". I'm guessing they're both used for scripting purposes.

lisati
September 13th, 2009, 12:04 AM
xyzzy

or


plugh

To which a common response is something along the lines of "nothing happens".

Now to wander off before I get stuck in a maze of twisty little passages, all alike. (Or is that a twistly little maze of passages?)

mcduck
September 13th, 2009, 06:08 AM
Its counterpart is "true - do nothing, successfully". I'm guessing they're both used for scripting purposes.

Yes, I know that. But there's still something special in a program that does nothing and still fails. :D

Actually "true" works better, since when you run "fail" in a terminal it does nothing. To truly do what it's description says it should actually do something..

(Yes, I know that this would not make sense considering the actual purpose of the program)