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jeffeulogy
September 9th, 2009, 06:24 PM
ok, so i'm 28 years old with no post high school education. i've always been pretty competent with computers especially on the hardware side, been putting them together and taking them apart since i was 12, and haven't yet met a software problem i havent been able to solve with the aid of google.

i work in a warehouse as an order selector. my employer is making some drastic changes and while my job is safe, i'm not getting any younger and i'm a little concerned about how these changes will affect my ability to make money.

i'm thinking of going back to school to become a network engineer. i've been using linux for about 6 months now and while i'm no pro i'm becoming fairly competent and greatly prefer it to windows. what kind of online classes can i take in order to secure employment as a network admin or tech for linux systems? i'd like to fall into a job that pays comparably to what i'm making now (about 50k/yr) but starting out lower is fine too, especially if i could finish all my courses in 2 years.

can anybody offer advice?

baseface
September 9th, 2009, 06:32 PM
go to college and get your BS in computer science or information systems or whatever it is.

Stan_1936
September 9th, 2009, 06:44 PM
ok, so i....with no post high school education.....what i'm making now (about 50k/yr)....

:)

Are you serious?:P

Firestem4
September 9th, 2009, 06:48 PM
If you want to get into Networking the best advice I could say is take a CSNE Course at a local community college. I am actually starting class today for it. Its an accelerated course (normally 2 semesters worth but condensed to 1). This will first of all let you know if you're interested in it and can handle it.

You will have to complete your AA either way but you can complete your AA in Computer Science/I.T./Network Engineering at a local Community College and then transfer to a University for BS etc.

Good luck!

LowSky
September 9th, 2009, 06:50 PM
:)

Are you serious?:P

yeah its called the United States of America, we pay well.

2 years is all your looking for... check you local community/junior college. See if they offer a 2 years computer science degree. Or find a trade school like ITT or Devry and major in IT. Other options is to look into certification courses, usually required for people with college educations to prove they are knowledgeable in a piece of software

Danoz
September 9th, 2009, 06:55 PM
Can't really give you specific advice but I think you're definitely on the right track. Do some searching for your ideal job and see what kind of work experience/education they generally require. Set yourself up with a few informational interviews with prospective employers and you may even get lucky enough to have your employer finance your continued education while you get some on-the-job training.

Best of luck to you!

Ric_NYC
September 9th, 2009, 06:58 PM
Ok... Let me take this opportunity to ask you guys about the RHCE. What are the requirements to get that certification?


Thanks in advance!

baseface
September 9th, 2009, 07:10 PM
:)

Are you serious?:P

thats what i thought.
50k/year for doing warehouse work. whats that like $25/hour?

LowSky
September 9th, 2009, 07:14 PM
thats what i thought.
50k/year for doing warehouse work. whats that like $25/hour?

about that, warehouse stuff can be hard and demanding work, people even get college degrees in logistics and engineering to build delivery systems

but lets keep this on track.

RHCE, see this to see you level of qualification
http://www.redhat.com/certification/rhce/

Thelasko
September 9th, 2009, 07:18 PM
I'd go for an associates degree in computer science. It's only two years full time, and from what I understand, it pays pretty well. You can get it at most community collages pretty cheaply too.

jeffeulogy
September 9th, 2009, 07:19 PM
thats what i thought.
50k/year for doing warehouse work. whats that like $25/hour?

we're paid a flat 10 cents per case selected and i'm very good at what i do.


huge thanks to everyone that replied, you've given me a lot of options to consider.