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karlmp
September 1st, 2009, 10:01 PM
This is a question for all the coders out there. I code a bit myself. I was researching some software development cycles, and I was curious to know, How many lines of code can you work on or create in a day?
Yes I mean working on a program that you're seriously dedicated to.
Either that or tell me how many you can make over a certain period of time.

What I'm trying to find out is how many lines of code can the average programmer make in a day or over a certain period of time.

So please post what you think your rate is and the rate you think you can achieve if you really push yourself.

I'm interested in hearing your responses. Thank you.

Reiger
September 1st, 2009, 10:05 PM
I usually measure progress by the amount of unnecessary code I removed (be it IDE generated code that isn't quite as good as it can be, or traces of failed experiments/commented-out code): it is a sure sign of hitting a "milestone" that I can tidy it up a bit & orient myself towards the next part of the bigger picture.

EDIT: LOC is quite meaningless. My IDE can generate tons of perfectly useless code if I want to: Alt+Insert Add Property for every field you have in a Java object. You could, of course modify some to public if all you're doing is simple is()/get() set() operations on the data ... but that would cut out the LOC by 6 a property, wouldn't it?

mehaga
September 1st, 2009, 10:28 PM
Not an answer really, but... Progress is rarely measured by lines of code. Why waste words, someone else
said it much better :p

“Measuring Software Productivity by lines of code is like measuring progress on an airplane by how much it weighs”
Bill Gates

lykwydchykyn
September 1st, 2009, 10:33 PM
Not that I'm any great coder, but I can spent half a day getting one line of code right sometimes.

Mirge
September 1st, 2009, 10:36 PM
i usually measure progress by the amount of unnecessary code i removed (be it ide generated code that isn't quite as good as it can be, or traces of failed experiments/commented-out code): It is a sure sign of hitting a "milestone" that i can tidy it up a bit & orient myself towards the next part of the bigger picture.

Edit: Loc is quite meaningless. My ide can generate tons of perfectly useless code if i want to: Alt+insert add property for every field you have in a java object. You could, of course modify some to public if all you're doing is simple is()/get() set() operations on the data ... But that would cut out the loc by 6 a property, wouldn't it?

+1

denver
September 1st, 2009, 10:39 PM
it depends on what you are trying to program. I have a small perl daemon of ~800 lines. Took me about 5-6 weeks to tweak it just the way i like it. I still change stuff every once in a while. And im to lazy, but i think i could remove ~20% of unecessary coding :).

shadylookin
September 1st, 2009, 11:12 PM
depends on the problem. Some are just much more logically dense than others. It also greatly depends on if I've already got the logic figured out and just need to get it code it or if I have to start from scratch.

mcla0203
September 2nd, 2009, 01:22 AM
It is difficult to measure this, but if I do thorough testing of my fix it is usually around 1-2 issues being solved in a day. This is working with a complex system that is extremely large and fragile, however =P Something on a smaller scale and that I'm more familiar with would be much higher rate of progress.

kevinatkins
September 2nd, 2009, 01:44 AM
This brings to mind 'writing lines' at school as a punishment, and strapping maybe 6 pens together to get the job done quicker... guess I'm not on quite the right line here though.... ;-)

Me? I'm a total 'spaghetti programmer' - lots of mess, clean it up afterwards!

uljanow
September 2nd, 2009, 04:54 AM
15 hours a day, 6 days a week.

socool274
September 2nd, 2009, 05:04 AM
It would depend on how dedicated you are, I myself, sometimes get inspired. Sometimes I make many things in one day. I would say, the limit would be 1000 lines of C++ code per day.

Tony Flury
September 2nd, 2009, 11:07 AM
A good measuure of code progress is to actually define your unit tests first (before you write the code), and then to measure your progress in terms of the number of tests your code can actually execute successfully.

This meausre is related to the Agile development concept of test driven development.

A lot of people actually do this in their head anyway (i.e. they build the code incrementally, getting one bit working and then modifying to add further features).

I would agree with the other posters - lines of code is an almost entirely pointless measure - it depends on so many aspects - language used, libraries used, mandated architectures, coding standards etc.

WitchCraft
September 2nd, 2009, 01:12 PM
Industry standard: 5 lines on average per hour (including debugging & database work)