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rahrahmah
August 20th, 2009, 12:05 AM
I only just made the leap, after being rudely forced from my comfort zone by a fatal virus infection. It's been hard so far :(

I never thought all that fondly of Microsoft or Windows, but I grew up with it and I know how to use it. I knew how to check on things, install things, and could even troubleshoot my own problems more often than not.

Ubuntu is such a different animal. I don't know how to install things, and I never know if an error is my fault, the hardware's fault, or the software. Even if I had an inkling, I wouldn't know where to go to try and fix it, and when I ask for help I can't understand the answers. Even if I did know how to install things, the games I liked don't work anyway. I feel like my mother must feel whenever she tries to use a computer.

So how long did it take you to adjust? To learn how to talk to The Terminal (which I think of as being capitalized like that, since it's so intimidating), and install programs? How computer knowledgeable were you to start with?

Viva
August 20th, 2009, 12:09 AM
Three or four releases to be honest. That would be around two years. But I always knew, Ubuntu is better than Windows and accepted that it is just different.

JOHNNYG713
August 20th, 2009, 12:13 AM
Fully adjusted to Ultimate Edition (knowing where everything is,and names for app's) about 5-7 months ! Well worth the time and effort ! makeusoft and crapple will never see another penny from me!

K.Y.A
August 20th, 2009, 12:15 AM
I started using Windows98 on a machine with a 450mhz cpu and 128mb ram.
98 Failed.
I got windows ME.
Windows ME Failed.
Went looking for XP on ebay, but my search results kept turning up this odd thing called "Ubuntu". I decided to pay the $8, since i didn't know it was free.
My first release was 6.10, and it took me nearly a year to get used to it.
Although, now i use many more operating systems. NetBSD, Windows XP, Ubuntu 9.04, Debian 4. Lots of 'em.

Learning takes time.

jonian_g
August 20th, 2009, 01:23 AM
I'm a Linux user for about 3 years. Like you, I have been using windows for a long time and I could do the same things as you. After many frustrations with windows I decided that was time to try Linux.
I always had the opinion that linux was more for programmers and was difficult to use. After a week playing with the ubuntu live cd, I decided to install it on my PC (no dual boot). I felt the same way as you at the begining, but it took me 3-4 months to get used to it.
Everyday I learn new things and my knowledge for linux has increased dramatically for the time that I use it. The CLI (terminal) has become my favourite linux feature and I use it all the time. I can do with it more things in less time.

My advise is to read the ubuntu wiki and search these forums for help on your problems. You will learn things faster an get comfortable with your new OS faster. Also remember that you can do everything with the gui and you don't need the terminal.

HappyFeet
August 20th, 2009, 01:51 AM
I felt comfortable with ubuntu immediately. But to learn most of the basics took about 4 months or so.

juancarlospaco
August 20th, 2009, 01:56 AM
a reboot.
:)

Marlonsm
August 20th, 2009, 02:03 AM
It took me about a month to start feeling comfortable in Ubuntu, one month after that, I've almost given up after my Wubi install got problems. But just then, I realized how much I missed Ubuntu, so I reinstalled it. A few weeks later I was using Ubuntu more than Windows.

Now, almost a year after the first install, I'm at home in Ubuntu, but I still keep Windows in dualboot for the other people who use this computer, or for me, in case I need it, although, now when I need Windows, I just use a virtual machine.

Going to Ubuntu isn't easy, you need to understand how different it is from Windows, but after that, it's a really nice experience and I've learned a lot in this last year.

running_rabbit07
August 20th, 2009, 02:07 AM
I've used it since whatever that join date says, and I feel like it is a me thing now. I tried Fedora for a few days too but I liked the community and most importantly I liked having the option to try differing releases to see which one fits more. Karmic fits best but I really think I'll love Lusty.

OutOfReach
August 20th, 2009, 02:15 AM
Grasping the basics of Ubuntu and Linux in general honestly took me only about 2 days. I found it very straightforward.

The terminal, on the other hand took me about a month.

bodhi.zazen
August 20th, 2009, 02:35 AM
6 months.

When I converted it was not as easy as it is today (it was before distros such as Ubuntu and live CD's with graphical installers).

Post install most distros booted to a command line interface and you needed to know the secret hand shake "startx" or "startkde" or "telinit 5".

Sean Moran
August 20th, 2009, 02:36 AM
Interesting question, because the scope of 'adjustment' is quite broad. I could reply that it took 24 hours as the shortest possible time period, but the long answer would be just over ten years, but that depends on whether the learning curve includes the entire journey from the first Redhat 6.1 server config sans X-Windows, or just the transition from the win98 desktop to the Ubuntu desktop on this client.

I'd setup other people's networks with Redhat servers back around 2000 but always kept to the win9x clients and used Samba because I had some serious problems in getting X-Windows to work on some of the legacy video cards I've had to work with, and back then almost EVERYONE was afraid of Linux.

Mandrake 10 was the first one I got to run a nice desktop at 1280x960 without screen flicker that I couldn't find a way to prevent, but I ran out of smarts with configuring the ADSL in 2007 and reverted to Win98 primarily due to that, (as well as being awestricken by the thought of discarding the Pain'Shop Pro skills and having to learn the GIMP all over again aka laziness).

In late March this year, I figured that ADSL was now so popular that somebodies would have made it a fairly simple operation to setup the IP config on a Linux desktop, and after a few failed overnight download attempts for Fedora and a couple of others, I woke up one that first Saturday morning in April with a successful 699Mb download and burnt a viable Live Ubuntu 8.04 CD while the kettle was boiling for a coffee. I'm still amazed at how the CD actually booted up online from the very start. That is very impressive still. I have to admire those who know how to do things that I still don't, but it was simply automatic. Well hooray!

By Saturday afternoon I'd added Skype-Debian which worked like a charm on the Sunday afternoon for a VOIP interview with a fellow 10,000 miles away, and so that's the reason for the short answer of 24 hours.

A short time, but there was quite a bit of general Linux familiarity over the years from a non-GUI angle, and the adjustment process is still taking place, even with such basic things as the terminology of the mind-muttering that goes on in the process of graphic design work, and simple 'creature-of-habit' sorts of things. With PSP6 it was called 'Resize Image' on the menu, whereas with the GIMP, it's listed as 'Scale Image' and although I know this now, I still find myself habituallly repeating 'Resize Image' in my mind during those graphic operations.

I have also gone out of my way to try to make the Ubuntu desktop resemble the old Win98 desktop even to the point of using the same background image and layout for application windows, so the obvious sweetener has been to 'sort-of' imitate quite a lot of the old w98 look and feel, and then rely on what remains of the old Redhat 6.1 console knowledge, which was never more than a basic understanding of the simplest /etc/ files.

As many of the usual IT applications move towards online sorts of browser-based tasks and stuff like this forum here, the adjustment period also becomes shorter IMHO. In the end, there is very little adjustment at all, because the process of writing this post is performed in vBulletin, irregardless of whether I am using Netscape 7.2 on win98 or SeaMonkey 1.1.15 on Ubuntu 9.04.

Stan_1936
August 20th, 2009, 02:40 AM
I felt comfortable with ubuntu immediately. But to learn most of the basics took about 4 months or so.

Mee too. For my purposes, it(7.04) was instantly doing what I needed it to do.

After installing it, I never really took the time to go beyond the basics(with 7.04) but I guess sometime after that I must've picked up something cause I'm comfortable building it up from a mini install.

JillSwift
August 20th, 2009, 02:45 AM
I had a working knowledge of it within a few days after switching.

But I had a good amount of prior experience with *nix OSs, like AIX, Red Hat, Mandrake, etc. Both professionally and in passing. It made for a great head start.

BTW, don't let the terminal intimidate you. You don't need it, using it is just one possible option - especially with Ubuntu.

rajcan
August 20th, 2009, 02:58 AM
I started using Ubuntu last summer, and I'm just now really getting the hang of it. It really helped when I did nothing but use the commandline. By doing so you really get to understand what's going on behind the scenes.

konqueror7
August 20th, 2009, 03:06 AM
maybe a day or 2 or a reboot. when i installed ubuntu specifically, i intended to make it as a learning experience and make a full switch to linux. having conplications and problems, doesn't bother me at all. as of now, i had my old laptop on ubuntu-arch dual-boot.

and maybe in part of adjustment in relation to how you feel about your desktop, maybe i had a hard time really on using KDE-based distros, i started with suse server edition years ago with KDE, but didn't bother because i didn't know about gnome or other DEs/WMs.

as for the CLI, i think you can save more resource and be more flexible in exectuting programs and doing task. as others have said, don't be intimidated my it, and there are GUI tools already in ubuntu that can pretty much do the task without going using the CLI. =)

antmenj
August 20th, 2009, 03:08 AM
The first few months are the hardest but it will get easier. I now have the other problem if I have to use window$.

Like you I got sick of all the virus scanners, melware, spyware, firewalls etc that bring windows to an almost stand still and thought there must be a better way.

Started with Damn small linux downloaded on a win95b machine with no resume capability then got some 6.06lts cds from shipit. Now I download distros and give them to people.

Linux is not perfect and is a work in progress but utterly worth the switch in my experience. Hang in there:)

jwaclawsky
August 20th, 2009, 03:38 AM
I left windows when I ordered my Dell Mini 9 with 8.04. I did it as an experiment to see what Linux had to offer and expected to reload XP as soon as I got to a point where I couldn't be productive. I was surprised to find that Linux had the tools to do everything I needed for office, web browsing, communications and consulting work. All my equipment just plugged in and worked. I bought some HP multi-function machines and my printing, scanning and faxing needs were more than adequately met. I would say it took me approximately a 20 hours of investment time (over a week) to become comfortable. I have had a few problems but managed to resolve them all (mostly configuration) and I even upgraded and I am now happily running 9.04. At this point I see no need to go back to Microsoft and probably never will. Honestly, I don't miss the Microsoft world of viruses, bugs and slow running software.

madjr
August 20th, 2009, 05:13 AM
@rahrahmah

hi and welcome

the best place to find software (.debs) for ubuntu is http://www.getdeb.net/

with some games easily packaged for you that you can try

http://www.getdeb.net/browse.php

oh and add/remove (http://psychocats.net/ubuntu/installingsoftware) is a great quick way too (like an app center)

http://psychocats.net/ubuntu/images/installingsoftware01.png


about your question, well it took me 3 months to get 100% used to ubuntu (1st month is hardest)

of course i keep windows for 1 or 2 windows only games. But 98% of my time is in ubuntu (in fact i play some mmorpgs or online games on a daily basis just in ubuntu).

sometimes some hardware may not work as properly, but that is why the linux guys work so hard and every 6 months they bring big improvements. For example my hardware 2 versions ago was not fully supported, now is better than in windows.

lately I always check (or just ask) for hardware compatibility with Linux before any purchase. I even buy it pre-installed now for maximum compatibility (i.e. Dell, HP, system76 (http://www.workswithu.com/2009/08/11/system76-refreshes-expands-ubuntu-netbook-and-desktop-lineup/), etc)

in the upcoming weeks/months you will see how fast you get used to linux , look back and laugh.


anyway we would love to hear more feedback from you, this OS is shaped by the community (that means you also decide it's future).

coldReactive
August 20th, 2009, 05:13 AM
About a week.

Regenweald
August 20th, 2009, 05:44 AM
About the time it took to install. The Gnome desktop just made sense to me, everything was where I thought it would be. I wouldn't say i had to adjust to the terminal. I had to, and still have to, remember commands and their usage.
I'm a creature of repetition.

mamamia88
August 20th, 2009, 05:45 AM
about 10 minutes after i got it set up to be honest. i've always been under the impression that if you can read you can use a computer. honestly the gnome layout doesn't take long to get used to

running_rabbit07
August 20th, 2009, 05:59 AM
I am sure I am not the only one, but when I use am MS system, be it at school or whatever, I always go to click the Workspace Switcher and get frustrated when it's not there.

coldReactive
August 20th, 2009, 06:01 AM
I am sure I am not the only one, but when I use am MS system, be it at school or whatever, I always go to click the Workspace Switcher and get frustrated when it's not there.

Yeah, I often try to do CRTL+ALT+ARROW to switch workspaces myself and think, "d'oh!"

Regenweald
August 20th, 2009, 06:01 AM
I always find myself browsing UF, reading about some update in Testing and Discussion, then look to: docky>>Terminal>>sudo aptitude update. Never quite get there on an XP desxtop.

TheNosh
August 20th, 2009, 06:02 AM
well i didn't switch from windows to ubuntu exactly. i switched from windows to puppy linux. then when i got better hardware i switched to ubuntu. it wasn't very difficult either time.

i learned to use puppy out of necessity so it came in about a day. by the time i switched to ubuntu i had already learned enough about it that i felt right at home.

SunnyRabbiera
August 20th, 2009, 06:08 AM
well i didn't switch from windows to ubuntu exactly. i switched from windows to puppy linux. then when i got better hardware i switched to ubuntu. it wasn't very difficult either time.

i learned to use puppy out of necessity so it came in about a day. by the time i switched to ubuntu i had already learned enough about it that i felt right at home.

I too didnt start with Ubuntu, I officially started using linux with Mepis linux, but it got me used to things like Apt and synatpic

aldld
August 20th, 2009, 06:09 AM
I felt quite comfortable with Ubuntu when I first installed it. I had a firm grasp of some of the basics after about a month, and I switched to Arch Linux after about 4 months, just to see what that was like. I've been using Linux since some time in February, even though I've tried it out a bit with a LiveCD since Hardy.

running_rabbit07
August 20th, 2009, 06:12 AM
From the get-go I loved that when I needed a new program for something I just opened Synaptic instead of running to Best Buy with my wallet open.

Kazade
August 20th, 2009, 07:36 AM
Ubuntu is such a different animal. I don't know how to install things, and I never know if an error is my fault, the hardware's fault, or the software. Even if I had an inkling, I wouldn't know where to go to try and fix it, and when I ask for help I can't understand the answers. Even if I did know how to install things, the games I liked don't work anyway. I feel like my mother must feel whenever she tries to use a computer.


90% of the time, the problem isn't learning Ubuntu... it's unlearning Windows.

I mean, installing programs for example. Coming from Windows I guess you went straight to your web browser to start searching for programs to download. Even though Applications->Add/Remove is right there and does the work for you. It's not that learning how to install programs is hard, it's unlearning the way you were forced to do it on Windows.

Anyway, I installed Red Hat when I was like, 15 (so 10 years ago) tried it for a couple of weeks and then forgot about it. Then my friend discovered Lindows (now Linspire I think), again I forgot about it. Then about 4 years ago I had Suse installed on a second machine, but wasn't a fan. Then finally, a month or two later, I was introduced to Breezy Badger and I haven't looked back since! I guess that with Ubuntu I just found my way around pretty quickly, the difficulty in doing anything turned me off the previous distros (and back then Linux sucked for the desktop) but Ubuntu just worked (aside from many hours of fiddling with ATI drivers :( ) and I think I got used to it in a few days.

mcduck
August 20th, 2009, 10:06 AM
Hard to say, from couple of hours to a few days. Depends what you mean by "adjusting to Ubuntu".

But I had used different operating systems and user interfaces before, and had some background in command line and handling text-based configuration files. So in many ways moving to Linux felt more like returning to home after long, bad trip in the Windows world. :D

hyperdude111
August 20th, 2009, 11:58 AM
A few days to be comfortable using it, a while longer for terminal. But it took a few months for me to not re-install after every problem and learn to troubleshoot effectively.

Thinking about it, it was about this time last year I first used Linux.

Copernicus1234
August 20th, 2009, 12:06 PM
I have tried distributions on and off for many years, so Ive picked up a lot of knowledge. For me, switching completely to Ubuntu was easy. In the earlier years, I reinstalled it for every problem I had and I had many problems since I messed with everything and wanted to see what would happen. I have messed up quite a lot of installations over the years. :) I even tried every command in the /bin directory just to see what they all did... and I have redirected output from a command directly into hardware devices, making the system die completely.. :)

I remember when I first tried it and had to google for the equivalent of the dir command, how file access rights worked, how to compile, install etc. Its a lot of effort and I understand that its easier to continue with Windows for most people. But they once learned Windows. Linux is not more difficult, its just different. Today its easier than Windows to install and the software for additional programs even downloads and installs automatically. No longer do you have to compile if you dont want to.

Chame_Wizard
August 20th, 2009, 05:58 PM
17 Days .:guitar:

hessiess
August 20th, 2009, 06:17 PM
few hours.

spcwingo
August 20th, 2009, 06:25 PM
It took me ~1mo to be completely comfortable with Linux (I started on Puppy). Now it's almost second nature.

sugarland2k
August 20th, 2009, 06:33 PM
Not long, I can't affored Micro$oft anymore and I hate "secret - proprietary" software. FOSS rules. Got Kubuntu 9.04 on the Dell Mini 9 and it rocks.

RabbitWho
August 20th, 2009, 07:02 PM
. I feel like my mother must feel whenever she tries to use a computer.



That's such a wonderful line.

Tristam Green
August 20th, 2009, 08:04 PM
I never had to fully convert.

Being able to use Linux means I'll be able to use Linux.

Being able to use Windows means I'll always have a job.

Penguin Guy
August 20th, 2009, 08:08 PM
Only took me about two months, not all that different IMO.

Marlonsm
August 20th, 2009, 08:15 PM
Yeah, I often try to do CRTL+ALT+ARROW to switch workspaces myself and think, "d'oh!"

Same here, but I'm used to use the scrollwheel in the background to do so, or I just move the window to the border of the workspace.

I still doesn't understand why there is no such a great feature in Windows. (Yes, I know there are a couple of third-part ones, but I'm yet to see a freeware one as good as the one in Ubuntu)

VCoolio
August 20th, 2009, 09:06 PM
It took me one installation to realize that I was going to give Ubuntu a really serious try. But then I was really frustrated with Windows. With the help of google and these forums and irc I've learned a lot (so big thanks to all of you). Last week I deleted my rarely used windows partition. That's after using Ubuntu for 1,5 years. Not to bash windows, but ubuntu is just too much fun and way better for my needs. Still learning though. And I even don't use wine (I'm not much of a gamer and I don't rely on heavy Adobe products, so no need).
Learning curve: tweaking themes - basic installing - using terminal for compiling - using different window managers - bash scripting and a little python - tweaking anything - using terminal for as much as possible.

rahrahmah
August 20th, 2009, 09:17 PM
Thank you for all the responses. I appreciate the encouragement and stories about how you got to know this OS. The advice and resources are especially great.

For everyone who popped in to simply say "A few hours" and nothing more: are you saying that you had never, ever, seen or used ubuntu/linux before and you just magically knew how to use everything? What to type, what to command, where to do it? Are you programmers? Fairies?? Or just not including previous experience and exposure?

Tristam Green
August 20th, 2009, 09:26 PM
For everyone who popped in to simply say "A few hours" and nothing more: are you saying that you had never, ever, seen or used ubuntu/linux before and you just magically knew how to use everything? What to type, what to command, where to do it? Are you programmers? Fairies?? Or just not including previous experience and exposure?

Using Ubuntu really isn't all that hard, even if someone were to use it as their first Operating System

As for commands, there are a lot of commands that are similar to Windows Shell (DOS) commands, too.

:confused::confused:

Spencer Caplan
August 20th, 2009, 09:38 PM
For me it took about a month before I was really comfortable with my laptop. But, that being said I still am not extremely full of Terminal knowledge. I usually get around it, or poke around the Ubuntu forums for the correct commands to copy into it. Good luck with learning.:smile:

bodyharvester
August 20th, 2009, 09:41 PM
i dont think i have fully yet.

C!oud
August 20th, 2009, 09:43 PM
It was about 3 weeks till I was comfortable enough with Ubuntu. After that I started distro hopping :)

Warpnow
August 20th, 2009, 09:45 PM
The first Linux I ran was Damn Small Linux- Big mistake, obviously. I never got used to it. I got used to Ubuntu almost immediately but was scared and avoided anything that seemed risky.

Regenweald
August 20th, 2009, 10:39 PM
Thank you for all the responses. I appreciate the encouragement and stories about how you got to know this OS. The advice and resources are especially great.

For everyone who popped in to simply say "A few hours" and nothing more: are you saying that you had never, ever, seen or used ubuntu/linux before and you just magically knew how to use everything? What to type, what to command, where to do it? Are you programmers? Fairies?? Or just not including previous experience and exposure?

To be fair, adjusting to a new OS and learning to use it, to me, are separate and apart. I adjusted to the idea that things should work better and because i did my research before installation, the centralized Home folder was no surprise to me. So yes, I had never ever used a linux distribution before and mere minutes after installation I was indeed comfortably navigating the system, installing software i REALLy did not need through 'add remove' and messing about with themes, fonts and desktop effects.

As for the rest of the system, it was my first time using Gnome and at the time I had not yet made the distinction between DE and OS, but my background was in software support so i was accustomed to idiot managers dropping new T&A software in my lap today for training customers the day after. So i took the common sense approach: calmly, slowly navigate the system and apply some common sense to to tools presented to me. using 'Add Remove' was very natural and the entire 'System>>' menu felt like a gift. had to work my way up to synaptic, a few days before frequenting the terminal.

Also, I'd say that getting used to the idea of using terminal commands is vastly different to learning and using the commands.

Irihapeti
August 20th, 2009, 11:02 PM
Probably took me only a few days - I don't exactly remember. I dual booted for a couple of months, but that was only because I wanted to be really sure I didn't need Windows before I removed it.

But then, I'd been an office temp and I was used to being expected to use some obscure setup at very short notice. At least in the circles in which I worked at the time, not everyone used MS Word.

madjr
August 20th, 2009, 11:19 PM
Using Ubuntu really isn't all that hard, even if someone were to use it as their first Operating System

As for commands, there are a lot of commands that are similar to Windows Shell (DOS) commands, too.

:confused::confused:

actually if ubuntu is your first OS you have no trouble learning/using it

that's why i didn't maded the mistake of showing my kids windows first.

in fact my 8 year old is having a hard time getting used to windows and avoids it when possible, specially when he sees weird windows poping up alerting of viruses and spyware...

rahrahmah
August 20th, 2009, 11:29 PM
Using Ubuntu really isn't all that hard, even if someone were to use it as their first Operating System

As for commands, there are a lot of commands that are similar to Windows Shell (DOS) commands, too.

:confused::confused:

I think if it were someone's first OS it would be WAY easier to use, just as someone's first language is always "easier" than any you learn after.

As for commands, who has to use the Windows Shell? I mean, to me, this makes you a programmer. I don't consider myself computer illiterate, but I'm not computer fluent either. I knew enough to get by and fix some things, I even fixed a few things for friends, but I never, ever used DOS. I would be just as lost in that kind of Window's environment as I am with The Terminal. From age 9 when I got my first computer to 23 when I just switched to Ubuntu this month, I could probably count the number of times I've had to use that little black and white box on one hand. And it was all cut and paste, I couldn't remember what I typed or why for the life of me. Ubuntu seems to require that kind of communication with the computer with at least a little more frequency, and so seems far more mystifying and difficult for me.

Perhaps my first experience downloading something simply "traumatized" me. It was a piece of software that I had had before which had a Linux version, it was freeware, however it's not in the add/remove section. I tried and tried every (barely understood) thing they tried to get me to do to no avail. I gave up, and haven't tried to download or update anything since.

None of this is to say that I think Ubuntu should be made "easier", and in fact I think it's a shame that Windows hid the inner workings of computers away so effectively. Even people who are relatively computer competent like me don't know what's really going on behind the scenes because we've never had to know. You have to be not just literate but savvy, often VERY savvy to understand those things. That means we aren't able to solve our own problems most of the time, or judge programmer flaws and optimize our own machines. We don't know if we can have it better or not, so we just accept what they give us. Reading posts and hearing people talk about ubuntu/Linux gives me the impression that it's easier to access files, change things, and customize your experience (so long as you know what you're doing) compared to Windows, and easier to learn the ropes because of this forced interaction between people and code. I guess to bring it back to the first sentence of this post, I wish we HAD all grown up on Linux instead, because then we might all know a little bit more about a piece of technology we all rely on so heavily. (I at least wish I had, because then I wouldn't be so lost.)

Old_Grey_Wolf
August 21st, 2009, 12:42 AM
I didn't have to adjust. I started using computers in 1972. It was years later that home computers began to appear, and shortly afterward, Microsoft and Apple appeared. I've used a lot of different operating systems and application software over the 37 years. I got were I could "just use" whatever was in front of me. I was accustomed to reading the manual. Linux has man pages, and Ubuntu has the help icon and this forum. I didn't register on the forums for a year. I found most of what I needed from searching; therefore, no need to post.

Tristam Green
August 21st, 2009, 12:52 AM
I think if it were someone's first OS it would be WAY easier to use, just as someone's first language is always "easier" than any you learn after.

*REALLY* expand the horizons starting out and use both OSs interchangeably.

Yes, it can be done folks.


As for commands, who has to use the Windows Shell?

Batch scripting. It's not really programming, it's automation without delegation.

racerraul
August 21st, 2009, 01:30 AM
We've been using Windows for a long time... but earlier this year we decided it was time to change.

Adapting hasn't been easy, but then again it hasn't been a huge hurdle either. The key for us has been our will to learn. I also had brief moments with Linux in the past so it also helped to understand how it differs from Windows.

In the end, though. Both simply have different ways of handling the HW and as long you don't treat one as you would the other and instead approach it as willing to learn how each gets things done, it should become less of a hassle.

xpod
August 21st, 2009, 01:33 AM
Having only used Windows and indeed computers for a few short months prior to discovering Ubuntu/Linux i never had any trouble adjusting whatsoever.Quite the opposite in fact.Windows was forgotten within hours and gone completely by the end of the week.
I`d never even heard of Ubuntu/Linux prior to stumbling across the main site so i didn`t have any of those preconceived ideas that many long time Windows users seem to have upon making the switch....or attempting to.
Was it confusing & frustrating at times?, you bet, but no more so than the previous few months with Windows had been.
To be fair to Windows i started out on Ubuntu with a nice clean installation.The same cant be said for the first Windows installations i ever used.Now those were fun & games.

madjr
August 21st, 2009, 04:21 AM
Having only used Windows and indeed computers for a few short months prior to discovering Ubuntu/Linux i never had any trouble adjusting whatsoever.Quite the opposite in fact.Windows was forgotten within hours and gone completely by the end of the week.
I`d never even heard of Ubuntu/Linux prior to stumbling across the main site so i didn`t have any of those preconceived ideas that many long time Windows users seem to have upon making the switch....or attempting to.
Was it confusing & frustrating at times?, you bet, but no more so than the previous few months with Windows had been.
To be fair to Windows i started out on Ubuntu with a nice clean installation.The same cant be said for the first Windows installations i ever used.Now those were fun & games.


happends to me, i keep forgetting how to use windows (even thou i used it for about 10 years...)

spcwingo
August 21st, 2009, 04:35 AM
90% of the time, the problem isn't learning Ubuntu... it's unlearning Windows.

I agree with this whole-heartedly.

mcduck
August 21st, 2009, 07:34 AM
As for commands, who has to use the Windows Shell? I mean, to me, this makes you a programmer.

It really doesn't.

I got my first PC when DOS was the thing. Everybody had to use command line, as there was no other options. and surprisingly everybody also was able to do that, no matter what they did as their job. All the same people who these days would only open their computer once a week to type some text in Word used to open their computer once a week, enter the commands to start WordPerfect and type some text. :)

So, using CLI doesn't require any special skills or abilities. Everybody can do that, if they want (or have to).

It's user interface, not programming. Programming is making programs, using a user interface is normal interaction between human and the computer to get things done.

(I also like to point out that using command-line interface is amazingly close to the speech-controlled computers you see in the sci-fi movies as current technology allows. Just replace the speech with a keyboard, the rest is the same. You type sentences that tell the computer what you want it to do. Imagine a sci-fi movie where people would have to walk around the room pointing things with their index fingers to control their computers.. ;))

konqueror7
August 21st, 2009, 07:40 AM
@rahrahmah
well, we don't really have 'fairies' so to speak. but i guess much of us has somehow gone through using DOS in our windows days, and also some of us are developers, and somehow just were able to grasp the basics and commands and all others fairly good. i've first used an atari computer, and didn't even bother the OS was, as long i could play games. then got windows 98, ME, and XP, and some vista, and from all those OSs, surely you've gone through some problems and went to the terminal also. =)

Muppeteer
August 21st, 2009, 08:09 AM
I started using Ubuntu back when Edgy was out. Think that was the end of 2006, though i had dabbled a little with other distro's but never really got anywhere with them. I'd say it took about a month to learn most of the basics, and i was compiling my own kernel etc at that point. Though i had a lot of free time and nothing to do but read, so i guess that helped. Then last August i switched to Arch, in my quest to learn more :)

cmay
August 21st, 2009, 10:42 AM
I only just made the leap, after being rudely forced from my comfort zone by a fatal virus infection. It's been hard so far :(

I never thought all that fondly of Microsoft or Windows, but I grew up with it and I know how to use it. I knew how to check on things, install things, and could even troubleshoot my own problems more often than not.

Ubuntu is such a different animal. I don't know how to install things, and I never know if an error is my fault, the hardware's fault, or the software. Even if I had an inkling, I wouldn't know where to go to try and fix it, and when I ask for help I can't understand the answers. Even if I did know how to install things, the games I liked don't work anyway. I feel like my mother must feel whenever she tries to use a computer.

So how long did it take you to adjust? To learn how to talk to The Terminal (which I think of as being capitalized like that, since it's so intimidating), and install programs? How computer knowledgeable were you to start with?

i did not know anything about computers and i did not care at all to begin with. it took me 6 month to learn as much as i needed to feel that i would never need windows again.
its about four or maybe five years ago i think.

xpod
August 21st, 2009, 10:45 PM
happends to me, i keep forgetting how to use windows (even thou i used it for about 10 years...)

I said "forgotten" although that`s not strictly true.
It was forgotten as far as my own computers were/are concerned but i`ve actually spent quite a bit of time since then fixing other peoples Windows problems.
Some are hardware or network problems but 9 out of 10 are just the typical everyday Windows issues that people suffer with.
Ironically, i`ve learned far more about Windows since i stopped using it than i ever did during the short time i had it installed.:-?

AndyCooll
August 21st, 2009, 11:46 PM
It didn't take me long to adjust to Linux and the way it worked, possibly up to a month. I'd already been using Firefox, OpenOffice.org etc for a few months previous on Windows anyway.

And then a few more months before I reached the point where I was essentially using Linux all the time.

However, it probably took me about six months to take the final step and delete my Windows partition.

:cool:

#11u-max
August 21st, 2009, 11:58 PM
I felt comfortable with ubuntu immediately. But to learn most of the basics took about 4 months or so.
same here :)

isynge
August 22nd, 2009, 12:21 AM
After about 5 weeks on it I'm pretty comfortable with the boxes I have running Ubuntu and have bitten the bullet to shift to all household portable machines running Ubuntu - although there is a bit of trepidation associated with this and there's a mild sick feeling of dread about the soon to arrive Dell Mini with Ubuntu installed rather than XP.

There are still things I know inherently how to do in XP that I'm still feeling my way in Ubuntu, and the main desktop machine which does a lot of server tasks is probably going to be an XP machine for a while yet, but Ubuntu, when forced on me by a hard disk failure on a laptop, has been pretty easy to get to grips with, helped, I think by a dabble with Suse (a paid for distro back in 2006) and a struggle to make that work with a recalcitrant Toshiba Tecra - the hard lessons learned there made me both appreciate how easy Ubuntu is and give me the confidence to know that if push came to shove I was fundamentally capable of making it work.

Going to be a long road - but then so was learning DOS, Windows, and everything else - it does strike me as a worthwhile road to travel though.