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View Full Version : Heatsink/fan bolted directly to AM2+ motherboard (plastic hooks are broken)



MaxIBoy
August 19th, 2009, 08:23 PM
Okay, I have this microATX AM2+ Gigabyte motherboard sitting in a box on my shelf. One of the plastic "hooks" on the AM2+ socket was snapped off, but otherwise it's a perfectly good motherboard.

Recently, I've been giving some thought to the possibility of putting together a new computer and putting some of my spare parts to use, and I was wondering if that motherboard would still be useful.

So, is there a such thing as a heatsink and fan which bolts directly to the motherboard or in some way doesn't need that plastic hook? The newegg descriptions never specify either way, but I know I've seen heatsinks for other sockets which did this.


Thanks,
-Max.

Skripka
August 19th, 2009, 08:45 PM
Okay, I have this microATX AM2+ Gigabyte motherboard sitting in a box on my shelf. One of the plastic "hooks" on the AM2+ socket was snapped off, but otherwise it's a perfectly good motherboard.

Recently, I've been giving some thought to the possibility of putting together a new computer and putting some of my spare parts to use, and I was wondering if that motherboard would still be useful.

So, is there a such thing as a heatsink and fan which bolts directly to the motherboard or in some way doesn't need that plastic hook? The newegg descriptions never specify either way, but I know I've seen heatsinks for other sockets which did this.


Thanks,
-Max.


I'd think you should be able to find a new plastic AM2/2+/3 mount clip, somewhere.

The only motherboards nowadays that use HSF bolting directly to the mainboard are Intel LGA socket boards (775,1366, etc)...I'd advise against drilling holes into your mainboard to make an AM2 board compatible with an LGA-style HSF :)

tgalati4
August 19th, 2009, 09:09 PM
You might be able to use epoxy. Place a 7-lb weght (a typical hold-down value) on the heatsink and cement with a two-part epoxy at all 4 corners. Let it dry for a couple of days.

Presumably the 4 hold-down blobs should be able to take 1.25 lbs of pull each.

Sometimes you can use thin, steel wire and wire down the heatsink in place of the clip. You might have to drill small holes between the plastic frame and the heat sink. Cut the wire short afterward and tape it so it doesn't short anything.

Drilling through the motherboard will probably trash the board, so don't do that.

MaxIBoy
August 19th, 2009, 10:31 PM
I was actually thinking of unbolting the plastic and using those holes for the heatsink, not drilling of course.

Wire seems plausible, I just worry about having a good solid contact with the CPU. Epoxy won't work, I may want to remove the heatsink in the future.

Thanks for the suggestions so far!

gn2
August 19th, 2009, 10:41 PM
A few years back Zalman's first graphics card cooler, the ZM17CU (http://www.quietpc.com/gb-en-gbp/products/discontinued/zm17-cu) used a two-part glue to stick a large and heavy copper heatsink direct to the GPU.
This glue would probably work a treat so long as your heatsink isn't too big and heavy.
You can still get the glue (http://candccentral.co.uk/acatalog/Zalman-Thermal-Adhesive.html).

MaxIBoy
August 19th, 2009, 10:48 PM
The CPU would fall out of the socket if any serious weight were put on it. (I don't want to put this in a horizontal desktop case.)

gn2
August 19th, 2009, 10:56 PM
Zip ties through the holes?

blur xc
August 19th, 2009, 11:09 PM
Okay, I have this microATX AM2+ Gigabyte motherboard sitting in a box on my shelf. One of the plastic "hooks" on the AM2+ socket was snapped off, but otherwise it's a perfectly good motherboard.

Recently, I've been giving some thought to the possibility of putting together a new computer and putting some of my spare parts to use, and I was wondering if that motherboard would still be useful.

So, is there a such thing as a heatsink and fan which bolts directly to the motherboard or in some way doesn't need that plastic hook? The newegg descriptions never specify either way, but I know I've seen heatsinks for other sockets which did this.


Thanks,
-Max.

I don't know about your AM2 mobo, but I had issues w/ the idiotic springy clips that came w/ my oe hsf for my intel processor so I bought a trick zalman hsf (socked 775). Their mounting places a plastic bracked on the back side of the mobo w/ metal threads, and another plastic bracket on the top of the mobo. Screws sandwich the mobo between these two bracket, making for a very nice, secure rigid, mounting system. then the hsf combo bolted to their bracket. Very easy install, contrary to many of the newegg descriptions.

Also, the zalman website has some slick little animations detailing the installation of their hsf setups. It's worth a look.

BM

tgalati4
August 20th, 2009, 12:47 AM
You can find some special two-part zip ties that are used for that type of mounting. Basically it becomes a plastic rivet.

That would work well because you can pull some tension on them to keep the heat sink properly seated.

doorknob60
August 20th, 2009, 04:25 AM
Ah you gotta hate tha. I did that to my old Socket 7 motherboard, and now the possibility of me making anything out of that is gone :/ I have a few Socket 7 CPUs too, some of the most powerful ones. Oh well :/

swoll1980
August 20th, 2009, 04:38 AM
Use the old fish tank method. From what I saw, you won't need a heat sink.

HenrySGurr
April 1st, 2013, 03:05 AM
The different ways to attach the Heavy Heatsink, mentioned in this forum above, seem difficult and are mostly specialized for that motherboard situation only. (Except for plastic straps and epoxy. But often epoxy will not reliably stick to some surfaces.)


In my case, three of the four hook holes were broken, in the plastic "hold-down" frame and the plastic not workable for an epoxy fix. I would modify the plastic frame, such as drill holes in it, but the plastic frame is impossible to remove, and removing the motherboard, for access to the plastic frame, seemed too difficult compared to the following:


I was able to make a somewhat complex wire rectangle, that ran under the respective four corners of the plastic frame, with bent up sections on each side of the heatsink: The bent up portions, provided solid places for the 4 hold down hooks that hold the heatsink.


Send me an email, and I can send photos of what this wire rectangle looks like, as well as photos of what the final assembly looks like.
The fitting of the wire rectangle was accomplished with the motherboard in place. The wire if bendy enough for me to slice it around the bottom edges of the plastic rectangle, and then it snaps into place. Add HSF, and computer boots up great!!!


Google will find me at Professor Henry Gurr

Elfy
April 1st, 2013, 04:30 PM
Old thread closed.